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Windspeaker Publication

Windspeaker Publication

Established in 1983 to serve the needs of northern Alberta, Windspeaker became a national newspaper on its 10thanniversary in 1993.

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Brantford Ontario

Page 8

Canadian Heritage Minister Sheila Copps handed out a cheque at Brantford's Pine Tree Native Friendship Centre on Oct. 11; the minister told this publication it won't be the last.

Interim funding of $898,992 was announced by the minister. The funds will assist with the delivery of programs. Eighteen friendship centres across the country will receive about $50,000 each.…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Brantford Ontario

Page 8

Canadian Heritage Minister Sheila Copps handed out a cheque at Brantford's Pine Tree Native Friendship Centre on Oct. 11; the minister told this publication it won't be the last.

Interim funding of $898,992 was announced by the minister. The funds will assist with the delivery of programs. Eighteen friendship centres across the country will receive about $50,000 each.…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Brantford Ontario

Page 8

Canadian Heritage Minister Sheila Copps handed out a cheque at Brantford's Pine Tree Native Friendship Centre on Oct. 11; the minister told this publication it won't be the last.

Interim funding of $898,992 was announced by the minister. The funds will assist with the delivery of programs. Eighteen friendship centres across the country will receive about $50,000 each.…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Brantford Ontario

Page 8

Canadian Heritage Minister Sheila Copps handed out a cheque at Brantford's Pine Tree Native Friendship Centre on Oct. 11; the minister told this publication it won't be the last.

Interim funding of $898,992 was announced by the minister. The funds will assist with the delivery of programs. Eighteen friendship centres across the country will receive about $50,000 each.…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Calgary

Page 7

A legal action that has been called the most important Native rights lawsuit in Canada will soon move into its second phase now that basic information has been put into the court record.

Close to 100 days of trial hearings and more than 400 days of examinations of witnesses have been conducted so far in the case of Victor Buffalo v. the Queen. The trial, begun May 1, 2000…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Calgary

Page 7

A legal action that has been called the most important Native rights lawsuit in Canada will soon move into its second phase now that basic information has been put into the court record.

Close to 100 days of trial hearings and more than 400 days of examinations of witnesses have been conducted so far in the case of Victor Buffalo v. the Queen. The trial, begun May 1, 2000…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Calgary

Page 7

A legal action that has been called the most important Native rights lawsuit in Canada will soon move into its second phase now that basic information has been put into the court record.

Close to 100 days of trial hearings and more than 400 days of examinations of witnesses have been conducted so far in the case of Victor Buffalo v. the Queen. The trial, begun May 1, 2000…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Calgary

Page 7

A legal action that has been called the most important Native rights lawsuit in Canada will soon move into its second phase now that basic information has been put into the court record.

Close to 100 days of trial hearings and more than 400 days of examinations of witnesses have been conducted so far in the case of Victor Buffalo v. the Queen. The trial, begun May 1, 2000…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Richie Hardinge, Windspeaker Contributor, Brandon Manitoba

Page 6

There are far too many who believe that First Nations people don't have the ability to reach their goal of self-government, said former national chief Phil Fontaine to the Assiniboine Community College in Brandon, Man. on Sept. 21. His audience was primarily the Aboriginal student body and some of the media department students.

"Today, 90 per cent of the regional budget…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Richie Hardinge, Windspeaker Contributor, Brandon Manitoba

Page 6

There are far too many who believe that First Nations people don't have the ability to reach their goal of self-government, said former national chief Phil Fontaine to the Assiniboine Community College in Brandon, Man. on Sept. 21. His audience was primarily the Aboriginal student body and some of the media department students.

"Today, 90 per cent of the regional budget…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Richie Hardinge, Windspeaker Contributor, Brandon Manitoba

Page 6

There are far too many who believe that First Nations people don't have the ability to reach their goal of self-government, said former national chief Phil Fontaine to the Assiniboine Community College in Brandon, Man. on Sept. 21. His audience was primarily the Aboriginal student body and some of the media department students.

"Today, 90 per cent of the regional budget…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Richie Hardinge, Windspeaker Contributor, Brandon Manitoba

Page 6

There are far too many who believe that First Nations people don't have the ability to reach their goal of self-government, said former national chief Phil Fontaine to the Assiniboine Community College in Brandon, Man. on Sept. 21. His audience was primarily the Aboriginal student body and some of the media department students.

"Today, 90 per cent of the regional budget…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Joan Taillon, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Winnipeg

Page 6

Metis rights to hunt, trap and fish that have been denied them since Confederation may be protected as a result of new talks that are planned between the Manitoba Metis Federation and the province.

On Oct. 18, Metis federation president David Chartrand announced the new MMF Commission for the Metis Laws of the Hunt, along with a community consultation process that will…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Joan Taillon, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Winnipeg

Page 6

Metis rights to hunt, trap and fish that have been denied them since Confederation may be protected as a result of new talks that are planned between the Manitoba Metis Federation and the province.

On Oct. 18, Metis federation president David Chartrand announced the new MMF Commission for the Metis Laws of the Hunt, along with a community consultation process that will…

  • October 26, 2001
  • Joan Taillon, Windspeaker Staff Writer, Winnipeg

Page 6

Metis rights to hunt, trap and fish that have been denied them since Confederation may be protected as a result of new talks that are planned between the Manitoba Metis Federation and the province.

On Oct. 18, Metis federation president David Chartrand announced the new MMF Commission for the Metis Laws of the Hunt, along with a community consultation process that will…