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Windspeaker Publication

Windspeaker Publication

Established in 1983 to serve the needs of northern Alberta, Windspeaker became a national newspaper on its 10thanniversary in 1993.

  • October 18, 2016
  • Shari Narine Windspeaker Contributor OTTAWA

First Nations in Canada are polarized when it comes to oil and gas development.

“You have to respect the inherent right to self-determination… That right to self-determination that Indigenous people have is the right to say yes and the right to say no,” said National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations.

First Nations have been vocal on both ends of the…

  • October 18, 2016
  • Shari Narine Windspeaker Contributor OTTAWA

After two months of silence, Indigenous organizations are reaching out to the commission for the national inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls and offering their support to get the ball rolling.

“It is frustrating when you have families coming to you, especially at the vigil, and they’re wanting answers now and there are no answers I can give right now because I…

  • October 13, 2016
  • Barb Nahwegahbow Windspeaker Contributor TORONTO

“I made a vow to protect the land and to protect the water, but most of all, I would protect my children and that’s what I’m doing,” said Wilma Steele of Standing Rock Nation. She has four children ages 9, 5, 3 and 2 years old.

“They’re my motivation,” she said. “They’re my strength to keep me going. When I look at them, I tell myself, ‘I gotta fight harder against this pipeline’.”…

  • October 12, 2016
  • Shari Narine Windspeaker Contributor DZAWADA’ENUXW NATION, B.C.

 

 Dzawada’enuxw Nation Chief Willie Moon is giving notice to all logging companies and tourism agencies: deal directly with his First Nation and don’t cite the Great Bear Rainforest Agreement as a talking point.

As far as Moon is concerned, Dzawada’enuxw traditional territory in the Great Bear Rainforest is not part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy. The canopy was endorsed…

  • October 12, 2016
  • Sam Laskaris Windspeaker Contributor CALGARY

The Aboriginal content at Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame will soon be expanding. That’s because former National Hockey League star Bryan Trottier is one of seven individuals who will be inducted this year into the hall based in Calgary.

Trottier, who has Métis, Cree and Chippewa ancestry, is a seven-time winner of the Stanley Cup. He won six championships as a player and one as a coach.…

  • October 12, 2016
  • Shari Narine Windspeaker Contributor OTTAWA

The Indigenous Leadership Initiative is pushing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to put reconciliation into action by committing $500 million over five years to create a national network of guardian programs.

The money would come on top of the $8.4 billion committed to Indigenous peoples over the next five years in the first budget delivered by the Liberal government.

While there is…

  • October 12, 2016
  • Andrea Smith Windspeaker Contributor

What happens when science fiction meets Aboriginal literature? These two genres rarely—if ever—come together. Drew Hayden Taylor has broken new ground with the release of his book “Take Us to Your Chief.”

“It’s always been my observation that Native literature and theatre is a very specific and narrow path. It’s either a victim narrative, or dealing with something historical, or dealing…

  • September 28, 2016
  • Barb Nahwegahbow Windspeaker Contributor TORONTO

“It’s important to always appreciate the water and acknowledge the sacredness of the water, even though it’s not in the greatest shape,” said Vanessa Gray, 24, of Aamjiwnaang First Nation near Sarnia, Ont. “But for that reason, we have to appreciate the water and we have to respect it enough to protect it.”

Gray was speaking on a panel at Water is Sacred, an event held at the University…

  • September 28, 2016
  • Andrea Smith Windspeaker Contributor TORONTO

Tomson Highway is at it again. The pianist, playwright, novelist, honorary doctorate degree holder, and past Writer-In-Residence, will be playing his own music in a play he wrote opening Oct, 12.

The (Post) Mistress is co-presented by Pleiades Theatre and Théâtre français de Toronto, and is a one-woman-act about a Métis woman working in a post office, which alludes to some of Highway’s…

  • September 28, 2016
  • Dianne Meili

Historian was last War Chief of his tribe

By Dianne Meili

As a teenager, Joseph Medicine Crow heard eyewitness accounts of the 1876 Battle of the Little Bighorn from his step-grandfather, White Man Runs Him.

“He was one of Custer’s favourite scouts,” Herman Viola of the Smithsonian Institute wrote in the preface of “From the Heart of Crow Country”, one of…

  • September 22, 2016
  • Barb Nahwegahbow Windspeaker Contributor TORONTO

Photos by By Barb NahwegahbowA research report released Sept. 20 says the population at Grassy Narrows and Wabaseemoong First Nations are suffering from mercury poisoning. This includes those below the age of 30.

Dr. Masanori Hanada headed up a team that travelled from Japan to do the research for the report. Japanese experts on Minamata disease, a neurological syndrome caused by severe…

  • September 21, 2016
  • Andrea Smith Windspeaker Contributor CHAPLEAU, Ont.

 

 

 

 

 

Moose Cree war hero commemorated in home town

 

 

 

An Aboriginal Second World War soldier has been commemorated. A monument dedicated to Charles Henry Byce, the most decorated First Nations veteran of WWII, was unveiled Sept. 18 at the Royal Canadian Legion in Chapleau, Ont., Byce’s birth-town.

Sculptor Tyler…

  • September 21, 2016
  • Barb Nahwegahbow Windspeaker Contributor TORONTO

Toronto’s Native Canadian Centre was the venue for a meeting between national Indigenous leaders and International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland and Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, on Sept. 9.

Minister Freeland said the meeting was “the beginning of a really important dialogue between the government of Canada and First Nations, Métis and Inuit people…

  • September 21, 2016
  • Compiled by Debora Steel

 

The Toronto 2017 North American Indigenous Games Host Society has announced a partnership with McMaster University and the City of Hamilton to create “a western hub” for the eight-day international sport and cultural event scheduled for July 16 to July 23, 2017.

Five of the 14 sport competitions will be held in the Greater Hamilton Area including:

3-D Archery (Hamilton…

  • September 21, 2016
  • Compiled by Debora Steel

The Stz'uminus First Nation joined BC Ferries and the First Peoples’ Cultural Council to reveal the second of three Coast Salish designs for the new Salish Class ferries.

John Marston of Stz’uminus First Nation designed the artwork that will be on the new Salish Eagle.

Marston’s depiction of beautiful red eagles will adorn the hull of the new vessel. The design represents the…