Community Access

2016 Aboriginal Scholarship Guide

Windspeaker Aboriginal Scholarship Guide

 

Windspeaker Scholarship Guide

Please be aware that this Scholarship Guide is from 2016. We are currently updating this list. Sorry for the inconvenience as we do our work.

Windspeaker and AMMSA maintain an extensive list of scholarships and bursaries available to Aboriginal students.

If you are a First Nations (status and non-status), Métis, Inuit student in Canada, there are a variety of available funding sources to help offset the financial burden of receiving an education. 

Please check the lists to determine which scholarships/bursaries that you may qualify for, and then contact the program administrators listed directly...

Scholarship Search

Alberta Heritage Scholarships

Alberta Scholarships:

High School

Undergraduate

Graduate

Citizenship

Career Development

Student Athletes

Endowment Programs

Alberta Blue Cross

Alberta Scholarships

To stimulate the pursuit of excellence by recognizing outstanding achievement and by encouraging and assisting Albertans to achieve their fullest potential

For High School Students

Alexander Rutherford Scholarships for High School Achievement
More than 6,000 scholarships available to students achieving a minimum average of 80 percent in five designated subjects in grades 10, 11, 12:

$300 for grade 10; $500 for grade 11 and $700 for Grade 12 with a total value of up to $1,500.

Applicants must be Alberta residents who plan to enrol or are enrolled in a full-time post-secondary program of at least one semester in length.

Application deadline: no application deadline

Student Aid Alberta
Box 28000 Station Main
Edmonton AB T5J 4R4
www.studentaid.alberta.ca/scholarships
 


Rutherford Scholar

Top ten students graduating from grade 12, as determined solely on the basis of Diploma Examination results in English 30 or Francais 30, Social Studies 30 and three other subjects

Recipients will receive a plaque and $1,500 in addition to their Alexander Rutherford Scholarship

No application deadline. Recipients are selected from Alexander Rutherford Scholarships applications. No separate application required.


United World College Scholarships

Based on academic ability, leadership capability, references and an interview are awarded annually for two years of study at United World Colleges

Applicants must be Alberta residents in the process of completed Grade 11

Application deadline: March 1 for study commencing September of the same year


Adult High School Equivalency Scholarships

200 awards valued at $500

You are eligible if you've been out of school for three years, have achieved a minimum average of 80 percent as a full-time student in courses required for entry into a post-secondary program

Must be nominated by their institution by September 1

 


Alberta Scholarships For Citizenship

For Citizenship High School Citizenship Awards

One graduating student from each high school is recognized for outstanding characteristics in the areas of academic ability, leadership in school-sponsored, community or extracurricular activities, and a demonstrated willingness to place the good of others above personal ambitions. Nominations will be made by each high school and recipients will receive a plaque and letter of commendation.

Nominations will be made by May 1 and recipients will receive a plaque and letter of commendation.

 


Alberta Scholarships For Undergraduate Students

For Undergraduate Students Louise McKinney

Approximately 930 scholarships are available to reward students for their academic achievements and to encourage continued undergraduate study. Scholarships are valued at $1,500 at the undergraduate level and $3,500 for professional programs such as medicine, law, veterinary medicine, optometry, chiropractic and dentistry. Students enrolled in programs within the province are nominated by the awards office of their institution. Albertans enrolled in programs outside the province because their program of study is not offered in Alberta, should contact this office.

No application deadline. Recipients are selected from Alexander Rutherford Scholarships applications. No separate application required.


Alberta Women's Secretariat "Persons Case" Scholarships

To recognize students whose studies will contribute to the advancement of women or who are studying in fields where members of their sex are traditionally few in number

Awards range from $1,000 to $5,000

Application deadline: September 30


Charles S. Noble Scholarships for Study at Harvard

Three scholarships of $10,000 are awarded to Alberta students for undergraduate study at Harvard. The awards are co-sponsored by the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and an endowment established by Edmonton businessman Sandy Mactaggart.

Application deadline: May 15


Charles S. Noble Scholarships for Student Leadership

A total of 80 awards valued at $300 each are available to recognize outstanding leadership in the areas of student government, student societies, clubs or organizations at the post-secondary level.

Application deadline: March 1


"Persons Case" Scholarships

These awards recognize students whose studies will contribute to the advancement of women, or who are studying in fields where members of their sex are traditionally few in number. Selection is based on program of studies, academic achievement and financial need. Awards range in value from $1,000 to $5,000. A maximum of $20,000 is available each year.

Application deadline: September 30

 


For Graduate Students

Sir James Lougheed Awards of Distinction
Fifteen awards are available to recognize academic excellence and provide Albertans with the opportunity for advanced study at institutions outside of the province. Scholarships are valued at $10,000 for master's and $15,000 for doctoral level study.

No application deadline. Recipients are selected from Alexander Rutherford Scholarships applications. No separate application required.


Ralph Steinhauer Awards of Distinction

Fifteen awards are available to recognize exceptional academic achievement of students studying within Alberta. Applicants must be Canadian residents who are enrolled or intending to enrol at an institution in Alberta. Scholarships are valued at $10,000 for study at the master's level, and $15,000 for doctoral level study.

Application deadline: February 1


Alberta Ukrainian Centennial Commemorative Scholarships

Two awards are available to provide academic opportunities for a student from Ukraine to study in Alberta and for a student from Alberta to study in Ukraine. Scholarships are for graduate level study, and will be awarded every second year.

Application deadline: February 1


Government of Alberta Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships

Approximately 130 awards are available annually to provide the incentive and means for Canadians to pursue graduate study at Alberta post-secondary institutions. Scholarships are valued at up to $9,300 and fellowships at up to $10,500. Nominations are made by each graduate faculty in Alberta.

Nomination deadline: students should consult their faculty of graduate studies


Student Aid Alberta
Box 28000 Station Main
Edmonton AB T5J 4R4
www.studentaid.alberta.ca/scholarships

 

Aboriginal Health Careers Bursary

Application deadline: May 15
Approximately 20 bursaries are available for aboriginal students in Alberta entering their second or subsequent year of post-secondary education in a health field. Applicants must be Indian, Inuit or Métis and have been residents of Alberta for a minimum of three years prior to applying. Awards are valued at up to $12,000/year for college programs, and $13,000/year for university programs.


The Alberta Press Council Scholarship

Application deadline: January 15
One scholarship of $1,000 is awarded yearly to an Alberta high school student enrolling in post-secondary studies. The award is based on the applicant's ability to write an essay on a specified topic. Application forms are available from high school counsellors and the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund.


Janet and Horace Allen Scholarship
Application deadline: June 1
One scholarship of $1,500 will be awarded to the top science graduate from Crowsnest Pass High School who is an Alberta resident and has enrolled full-time in a post-secondary institution. Application forms are available from the school counsellor.


Theodore R. Campbell Scholarship

Nomination deadline: Contact the registrars office at Blue Quills First Nations College.
One scholarship valued at $1,500 will be awarded for an aboriginal student studying Education at Blue Quills First Nations College. Applicants must be Alberta residents and in their second year of the Blue Quills University Transfer program.

 


CANA Scholarships

Application deadline: October 31
The CANA Scholarships were designed to recognize and reward the exceptional academic achievement of children of CANA employees. Applicants must be Alberta residents entering their second or subsequent year of study at an eligible institution. One award of $1,500 and two awards of $1,000 are available each year. Application forms are available from CANA and from the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund

 


Robert C. Carson Memorial Bursary

Nomination deadline: Students should contact the financial aid office of their institution.
Five awards valued at $500 are available to aboriginal Albertans without sponsorship enrolled full-time in their second year of the Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Diploma or Faculty of Law programs at eligible institutions.

 


Hal Harrison Memorial Scholarship

Application deadline: June 1
One award of $250 is available to the grade twelve student with the highest marks who is enrolled full-time at a post-secondary institution and one of their parents is a member in good standing with the Alberta Volunteer Fire Fighters Association.

 


The Helen and George Kilik Scholarship

Application deadline: Contact school
This scholarship was developed to assist a student from Olds High School in establishing himself in his career. The recipient must be an Alberta resident who has completed all of his high school studies at Olds High School. The school will select the recipient based on financial need, involvement in extra-curricular activities and academic achievement. The award is valued at $1,000


Anna & John Kolesar Memorial Scholarship

Application deadline: July 1
One scholarship valued at $1,200 will be awarded to the applicant with the highest academic average in three designated subjects as shown on an Alberta Education Transcript. Applicants must be Alberta residents, planning to enrol in a Faculty of Education, and from a family where neither parent has a university degree.


Hal Neldner Scholarships and Telus Bursaries

Application deadline: June 1
Two scholarships for the top high school graduates, two for the top post-secondary students and two random bursaries all valued at $1,500 will be awarded to students whose parents are employed by Telus and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Applicants must reside in Alberta and be enrolled full-time in a post-secondary program. Application forms are available through Telus-Human Resources Section, high school counsellors, and the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund.


The Robin Rousseau Memorial Mountain Achievement Scholarship

Application deadline: January 30
This scholarship was developed to recognize excellence in leadership development and safety in the mountain community. Applicants must be Alberta resident's, active in the mountain community and must be planning on taking a recognized Mountain Leadership and Safety certification program. One recipient will be chosen each year by a selection committee who will look at each applicant's work record, volunteer activities, personal goals and how these relate to mountain safety. The selection committee will determine the value of the award and the recipient will be reimbursed this amount after they complete their program.


Dr. Robert and Anna Shaw Scholarships

Application deadline: June 1
Awards are available to students graduating from Sexsmith Secondary School to continue in post-secondary studies based on their high school accomplishments. Two different types of scholarships are available. Students should contact the counsellor at the school for more information.


Staples Scholarship

Application deadline: June 30
Two scholarships valued at $2,000 each will be awarded to the top two applicants entering an eligible program. Applicants must be Alberta residents, planning to enrol in a Faculty of Business or Commerce. Averages are calculated based on the final marks in five designated grade 12 courses.


Alberta Scholarships For Student Athletes
Jimmie Condon Athletic Scholarships

Approximately 1,400 scholarships valued at $1,000 each are awarded to students at universities, colleges, and technical institutes who are members of designated teams, maintaining an average of at least 65 percent and enrolled as full-time students.

Nomination deadline: November 1


Charles S. Noble Junior Football Scholarships

A total of 30 scholarships valued at $1,000 each are awarded to junior football players who are currently enrolled full-time in a post-secondary institution in Alberta and are nominated by their team. The awards are co-sponsored by the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and the three Alberta teams in the Junior Football League.

Application deadline: October 1


Charles S. Noble Junior Hockey Scholarships

10 scholarships of $2000 are awarded to individuals who have participated in Junior Hockey and who are currently enrolled in full-time post-secondary study in Alberta.

Nominations are made by their respective team. The awards are co-sponsored by the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and the the Friends of Alberta Junior Hockey Society.

Application deadline: December 1, April 1, August 1


Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund Career Development Scholarships

Michael Luchkovich Scholarships for Career Development

These awards are given to individuals who have demonstrated outstanding ability in their work and are pursuing short-term, full-time study of less than six months or part-time study. Applicants must have worked in Alberta for a minimum of three years. Awards assist with direct educational costs.

Application deadline: December 1, April 1 and August 1

For more information or to apply for any scholarships on this page please contact:

Student Aid Alberta
Box 28000 Station Main
Edmonton AB T5J 4R4
www.studentaid.alberta.ca/scholarships

Alberta Scholarships

AltaLink Aboriginal Scholarship Program

This scholarship program is designed to recognize leaders in the Aboriginal community by offering eight scholarships to
Aboriginal students attending post-secondary institutions. Two eligible students from each of Treaty 6, 7, 8 and the Métis community in Alberta will be awarded with a $1,000 scholarship. 

ELIGIBILITY:
To be eligible, applicants must be currently enrolled in a post-secondary institution and:

  • Treaty applicants must be born in Alberta. 
  • Métis applicants must either be a member of the Métis Nation of Alberta Association or an Alberta Métis Settlement or must have been living in Alberta for at least the past three months with a Métis membership card from another province. 

HOW TO ENTER:
Application forms are available online at http://www.altalink.ca/responsibility/communityinvestment/powerful-education.cfm
and may be submitted by email or by mail to the address below. A transcript, either official or unofficial, and a photocopy of your status card must be submitted for the application to be considered. The deadline for receipt of the completed application is October 15.

Email: aboriginalrelations@altalink.ca,

or mail to

AltaLink
ATTN: Altalink Aboriginal Scholarship
2611 - 3rd Avenue SE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 7W7


Joe P Cardinal Bursary/Internship Award
Aboriginal Multi Media Society (AMMSA)

AMMSA is pleased to offer an annual Bursary/Internship Award to an Aboriginal student to further their education in communications specializing in broadcasting and/or journalism. This Bursary is intended to assist students in the 2nd or subsequent years of a degree program in radio broadcasting or journalism.

The Bursary is named to honour Joe P. Cardinal, Elder, AMMSA Board Member and leader who believed communications was key to greater understanding between people and cultures.

Applicants MUST:
Be First Nations, Inuit or Métis, hold permanent Canadian resident status and have in Alberta
Be enrolled in the 2nd year (or beyond) of a Canadian post secondary Journalism or Radio & Television Arts Program or Equivalent Certified Training Program (as recognized by Alberta Learning) and be able to produce a transcript of grades from the 1st year
Be available to participate in a 4 week internship program at AMMSA at the completion of the school year. (There is an opportunity for the internship to be extended to a 4 month paid internship.)
Be interested in acting as an ambassador for the broadcast industry and serving as a role model for other Aboriginal people to encourage them to pursue careers in broadcasting

Guidelines:
One bursary valued at $4,000 will be awarded each year. This award may be applied to academic and/or living costs. An additional $1,000 will be awarded to the student for their participation in the AMMSA Internship program.

Bursary recipients are eligible for continued scholarship awards each year they continue in the approved programs in the amount of $2,500 annually to a maximum of $10,000

 

Application Form:
Click here for word document

Selection Committee:
The management team of AMMSA will grade each application on the criteria outlined

Deadline for submissions: May 15, 2015

Please submit to
Carol Russ
AMMSA Bursary Selection Committee
13245 - 146 Street
Edmonton, AB T5L 4S8

Fax: 780-455-7639

Email: news@ammsa.com


Jim Pattison Broadcast Group Alberta Equity Scholarship

Removing barriers to employment for underrepresented groups!

This scholarship is intended for broadcast students in groups underrepresented in the broadcast industry, including Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, members of visible minorities, and women.
 
Available is one $2500 scholarship.

For more information:
 
www.chattelevision.ca
www.chat94.5.com
www.my96fm.com

 


Northern Alberta Development Council

 

Application deadline: April 30

Are you interested in living and working in northern
Alberta? If so, consider applying for one of the NADC Bursaries offered each
year to Alberta students. Bursaries are offered to students in a wide range of
programs including education, technical programs, health, business and social
services. Bursaries are valued at $6,000, with some specialty bursaries for
certain occupations valued at $9,000 and $12,000.  For more information visit our website at www.benorth.ca  Upon graduation, recipients live and work for one year
within the Northern Alberta Development Council boundary. Applicants must be
Alberta residents based on Students Finance regulations. Applicants must also
be within two years of completing their program. Students receive a maximum of
two bursaries.

Applications are available online: www.benorth.ca

OR:

Northern Alberta Development Council
Postal Bag 900-14
Peace River, Alberta T8S 1T4

780-624-6545 (toll-free first dial 310-0000)

Email: nadc.bursary@gov.ab.ca

 


ATCO Pipelines Aboriginal Education Awards Program

 

The
ATCO Pipelines Aboriginal Educational Awards Program is aimed at
supporting Aboriginal students from First Nations and Métis communities
in close proximity to our facilities. Successful applicants will
demonstrate a balanced lifestyle and commitment in the pursuit of
education. These awards, bursaries and scholarships are awarded to
select students who demonstrate leadership capabilities and strive to be
role models in their schools and communities.

Since the program was launched in 2011, this program has seen 74 students from across the province receive awards.

There are three different awards available:

  • Merit Awards - merit awards of $500 to be granted each year;
    Must
    be attending High School (completing grades 10-12); Maximum one award
    per applicant per calendar year; Must re-apply to be considered for
    subsequent years 

  • Bursaries - bursaries
    of $1,000 to be granted each year; Must be registered in a recognized
    trade/community/technical college diploma or certificate program;
    Preference will be given to those enrolled in a program relating to the
    natural gas industry;
    Maximum one award per applicant per calendar year; Must re-apply to be
    considered for subsequent years 

  • Scholarships
    - scholarships of $1,500 to be awarded each year; Must be registered in
    a university program intended to lead to a bachelor or graduate degree;
    Preference will be given to
    those enrolled in a program relating to the natural gas industry;
    Maximum one award per applicant per calendar year; Must re-apply to be
    considered for subsequent years

ELIGIBILITY

All
applicants must be enrolled full-time in a secondary or post-secondary
educational program, be Canadian citizens of Aboriginal ancestry and
originate from within 50km of ATCO Pipelines facilities. ATCO employees
and/or their children will not be considered for these awards.

HOW TO APPLY

Downloadable Application Form (pdf )

The deadline to submit an application is August 1st annually. Applications received after that date will not be considered during the review and selection process.

The following information must ALL be included in the application package in order to be regarded for any one of these awards:

  • A completed application form 

  • One reference letter from a teacher, faculty member, employer or community leader 

  • A short essay (minimum 250 words) describing why you are a suitable candidate for the award 

  • Proof of enrollment for the upcoming semester in a secondary or post-secondary institution

  • Transcripts from a secondary and/or post-secondary institution in which you are currently enrolled

Mail or deliver completed application packages, and direct official transcripts, to:

Corporate Communications
ATCO Pipelines
#1300, 909 – 11th Avenue SW
Calgary, AB  T2R 1L8

Website: http://www.atcopipelines.com/Community/Aboriginal-Education-Awards-Program

SELECTION

All
applications will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of
representatives from various departments within ATCO Pipelines.
Committees will be established each year specifically to review
candidate submissions for this program.

Poster: http://www.atcopipelines.com/Community/Documents/Ab_Awards_Poster_FINAL.pdf


The Belcourt Brosseau Métis Awards

Value: $2,000 - $9,000

If you are a Métis residing in Alberta and need financial help to pursue your education or upgrade your skills, a Belcourt Brosseau Métis Award can help you take the next step. It will give you the opportunity to continue your education by covering a portion of your tuition costs.

Deadline: March 31

For more information call: 1-866-626-0015

Web site: www.bbma.ca


Alberta Blue Cross 50th Anniversary Scholarships for Aboriginal Students

Closing date: September 20

Value: Varies ($375 - $1,250 depending on institution)

Number of Awards: Three

Applicants must be Registered Indian, Inuit or Metis and must have been residentsm of Alberta during their previous year of study. Applicants must have just completed their final year of high school and be entering into the first year of post-secondary studies at an accredited Alberta post-secondary institution.

Applicants will be evaluated based on the results as shown on their Alberta Education High School transcript. The top five courses with a minimum five credit value will be averaged to determine a percentage score. Financial need and community involvement will also be evaluated in determining the recipients of the scholarship.
Students will be ineligible if receiving more than $3,500 in other scholarships or bursaries for the current academic year.

Field of Study: Any full time program of two or more years duration.

Accredited Institutions: Alberta College of Art & Design, Ambrose University College, Athabasca University, Augustana University College (U of A), Blue Quills First Nations College, Bow Valley College, Canadian University College, Concordia University College, Fairview College (NAIT), Grande Prairie Regional College Keyano College, King's University College, The, Lakeland College, Lethbridge College , MacEwan College, Maskwachees Cultural College, Medicine Hat College, Mount Royal College, NAIT, NorQuest College Northern Lakes College, Olds College, Old Sun Community College, Portage College, Red Deer College, SAIT, University of Alberta, University of Calgary, University of Lethbridge

Applications should be sent to:

Alberta Blue Cross
Corporate Offices
10009-108 Street NW
Edmonton AB T5J 3C5
Fax: (780) 498-8096

web site: www.ab.bluecross.ca


Andy Collins Memorial Scholarship

Eligibility Requirements
 
Applicant mus te of Aboriginal ancestry within Zone II Metis Nation of Alberta regional boundaries
 
Entering a field in one of the following areas:  oil and gas, music or sports
 
Entering or enrolled in a post-secondary educational institute
 
Must demostrate a financial need
 
Applications Process
 
Fill out an application form available at the Zone II Regional Council office in Bonnyville
 
Attach the following with your application:  Letter of Acceptacne or proof of enrollment from the institute, short type-written profile on yourself and proof of Aboriginal ancestry
 
Applications will be accepted from January 15 of each year to July 1st.
 
A panel will review all applications.
 
Two letters of support must be submitted with application.
 
For More information:
 
Zone II Regional Council
Métis Nation of Alberta
Box 6497
Bonnyville, AB  T9N 2H7
Phone: 780-826-7483


Apeetogosan (Métis) Development Inc. Scholarships

Apeetogosan (Métis) Development Inc. has announced that they will provide six $1,000 cash bursaries to any qualifying Métis individuals that are in their first year of Post-Secondary education.  

All the applicant needs to do is go to our web site at www.apeetogosan.com to receive a copy of the details and application.
 
Michael Ivy, General Manager
Apeetogosan (Métis) Development Inc.
#302, 12308 - 111 Avenue
Edmonton AB T5M 2N4

Phone: 780-452-7951 -- Toll Free: 1-800-252-7963


Apeetogosan (Métis) Development Inc. Bursaries

Apeetogosan (Métis) Development Inc. is pleased to offer 6 annual bursaries of $1,000 to qualifying Métis students wishing to further their education.  The application form can be obtained by going to our website at www.apeetogosan.com.
 
The bursary is for qualifying first year post secondary students.
 
Michael Ivy, General Manager
Apeetogosan (Métis) Development Inc.
#302, 12308 - 111 Avenue
Edmonton AB T5M 2N4

Phone: 780-452-7951 -- Toll Free: 1-800-252-7963


Alberta Apprenticeship Scholarship Program

Number: 165

Value: $1000

Alberta industry is in desperate need of skilled tradespeople.

Funding for the Scholarship program was raised through an industry and government fund-matching campaign. Industry, with support from the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training (AAIT) Board, raised a grand total of $1.3 million and Alberta Learning committed to match the double of industry's contributions up to $1 million.

The first Alberta Apprentice Scholarships will be awarded in Fall 2002.
Complete criteria and applications will be available later this spring at www.tradesecrets.org and at local Alberta Apprenticeship Industry Training offices.

Information:
Fairview College
Financial Services Department
Toll free 1-888-999-7882, ext.654
E-mail: sbough@fairviewcollege.com


Laurence Decore Awards for Student Leadership

Eligibility: Applicants must be Alberta residents who are currently enrolled in a minimum of three full courses at a designated Alberta post-secondary institution. Applicants must also be involved in either student government or student societies, clubs, or organizations.

Additionally, candidates may be involved in student organizations at the provincial or national level or in non-profit community organizations.

Selection: Applicants must be nominated by fellow students from their institution.

Each institution is responsible for the formation of a Selection Committee to review nominations and recommend recipients.

Award: A total of 100 awards are divided among eligible Alberta post-secondary institutions.

Awards are valued at $500 each.

Nominations must be submitted to the institutions by March 1. Some institutions may impose an earlier deadline.

Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund (AHSF)
9th Floor- 9940 106 Street
Box 28000 Station Main
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4R4
Phone (780) 427-8640
(In Alberta, but outside Edmonton dial 310-0000)


Jason Lang Scholarships

Background: These scholarships were named in memory of Jason Lang, a 17 year old high school student who was killed in a school shooting. They are designed to reward the outstanding academic achievement of Alberta post-secondary students who are continuing into their second year of an undergraduate program.

Eligibility: Nominees must be residents of Alberta who continuing in the second year of a full-time program. Students must be attending an Alberta institution.

They also must have completed one year of an undergraduate post-secondary program that is at least two years in length.

The nominee must have been enrolled in at least 80 per cent of a full course load in their first year
and have earned a grade point average of at least 80 per cent.

Selection: Students will be nominated by the Awards Office of the Alberta institution where they completed their first year. The nominee must take at least 60 per cent of a full course load in their second year of the same program.

Students are not allowed to receive the Jason Lang Scholarship and the Louise McKinney Scholarship for the same period of study.

Post-secondary institutions may establish additional requirements for their nominees.

Award: Scholarships are valued at $1,000 each.

Deadline is August 1.

Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund (AHSF)
9th Floor - 9940 106 Street
Box 28000 Station Main
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4R4
Phone (780) 427-8640
(In Alberta, but outside Edmonton dial 310-0000)


AlPac Aboriginal Education Partnership Program

Award: Varies - full tuition for maximum five year period

Deadline: May 30.

Eligibility: Aboriginal person residing in Alberta-Pacific Forest Management area for at least on year pursuing post-secondary studies leading to a recognized degree certificate or diploma. Must possess suitable attitude and be willing to participate in a partnership.

Contact 1-800-661-5210


Theodore R. Campbell Scholarship

Deadline is June 1.

This scholarship was created to reward the accomplishments of an aboriginal student from Blue Quills First Nations College. The scholarship was established by the family of Ted R. Campbell through the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund Endowment Program.

Eligibility: Applicants must be Alberta residents who have completed the first year of an Education degree (university transfer) at Blue Quills First Nations College. Applicants must have completed a minimum of 24 credits with passing marks in all courses. The applicant must be continuing in the Education program.

Selection: Blue Quills will determine the qualifying applicant based on their 1st year grade point average.

Award: Each year 1 scholarship of $1,500 will be awarded.

Application forms are available from the Research and Planning Office at Blue Quills College

OR

Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund (AHSF)
9th Floor - 9940 106 Street
Box 28000 Station Main
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4R4
Phone (780) 427-8640
(In Alberta, but outside Edmonton dial 310-0000)


Robert C. Carson Memorial Bursary

Deadline: Students should contact the financial aid office of their institution.

Value: $500

Number Available: Five

Eligibility: Awarded to Aboriginal students without sponsorship enrolled full-time in their second year of the Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Diploma or Faculty of Law programs at Lethbridge Community College, Mount Royal College, Grant MacEwan Community College, University of Calgary or University of Alberta. Applicants must have been a resident of Alberta for a minimum for three years prior to applying.

Application forms are available from the institution's Student Awards Office.


Sylvia Schulze Memorial Bursary for Alex Taylor School

Offered through Grant McEwan Community College, Edmonton to female student who attended Alex Taylor School in central Edmonton, with priority given to an Aboriginal student.

For more information contact:
Executive Director
Grant McEwan Community College Foundation
Edmonton, Alberta
Phone: (780) 497-5545


TransCanada Aboriginal Awards Program

TransCanada has been a long time supporter of educational initiatives focused on Aboriginal people.  By encouraging and supporting Aboriginal people to obtain an education, we can help increase the number of Aboriginal professionals and trades people in the workforce.  We are proud of our long-standing commitment to education and we will continue to enhance and find new ways of furthering our support.  The TransCanada's Aboriginal Awards Program is designed to encourage and assist Aboriginal people (status and non-status Indians, Métis and Inuit) to obtain undergraduate post-secondary education.

Closing Date: Administered by the colleges

Value:  Variable  (based on interest earned on the endowment)

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry; maintain full course load in chosen program; possess promising academic qualifications; require financial support.

Available to students attending:    Grande Prairie Regional College; Lakeland College; Mount Royal College; Northern Alberta Institute of Technology; Olds College.

For more information contact:   Student Aid and Awards at the applicable colleges and/or visit the college's website to complete the on-line scholarship/bursary application


NAIT Aboriginal Student Club

Value: $800

Number: 1

Eligibility: Available to students of Aboriginal Heritage who are enrolled in the second year of the Forest Technology program.

Conditions: Awarded on the basis of academic achievement.

Applications: Apply on the NAIT application for scholarships AFTER August 1

Deadline: September 30th

Office of the Registrar
Student Awards and Financial Aid
The Northern Alberta Insituitute of Technology
Suite 1000
11762-106 Street N.W.
Edmonton, Alberta T5G 3H1


Syncrude Scholarships and Awards

Syncrude provides many scholarships and awards to assist students get the education they need to build successful careers in a variety of disciplines, including engineering, trades, nursing, education and environmental sciences.

Web Site: www.syncrude.com


Grant MacEwan College Foundation - Alberta

Deadline for application June 15 for following academic year

Aboriginal business Leadership Award

Four (4) awards of $1,500 each

Executive Director
Grant McEwan Community College Foundation
Edmonton, Alberta

Phone: (780) 497-5545


Imperial Oil - Aboriginal Education Award

Education award for students of Aboriginal descent, from the local Aboriginal communities, that are enrolled in a petroleum related program at a post-secondary institution. One recipient will receive a one time payment of $1,000. The recipient of this award will be given consideration for summer and/or permanent employment.

Application Deadline: June 30

Imperial Oil - Billion Barrel Scholarship

In 2009, Imperial Oil reached one billion barrels of production at its Cold Lake Operation. The Billion Barrel Scholarship was introduced to celebrate this milestone. This education award is for all students that are pursing post-secondary education. All high school graduates in the Lakeland are eligible to apply. Two recipients will receive a one time payment of $5,000.

Application Deadline: July 31

Imperial Oil - Women in Wage Award

This award is for women who are enrolled in a technical program at a post-secondary institution. The program of study will employ them in a non-traditional role in the petroleum industry. Supported programs of study include; Power Engineer, Petroleum Tech, Instrumentation/Electrical (IE) and Millwright trades. One recipient will receive a one time payment of $1,000. The recipient of this award will be given consideration for summer and/or permanent employment.

Application Deadline: August 31

For more information on our Educational Programs and Scholarships, visit: www.imperialoil.ca/coldlake or call 780-639-5195.


Alberta Sport, Recreation, Parks and Wildlife Foundation -
Alberta's Future Leaders Program

For young people of Alberta's indigenous communities

Program will use sport, recreation and the local environment to address the needs of Alberta's indigenous youth

Contact: Karla Moir (780) 422-7110

Alberta Sport, Recreation,
Parks and Wildlife Foundation,
Edmonton, Alberta


Alberta Foundation for the Arts Scholarships

The Queen's Golden Jubilee Scholarship for the Performing Arts

Deadline: March 1.

Applications that are postmarked on or before March 1 will be accepted. No late applications will be accepted.

Introduction
The Queen's Golden Jubilee Scholarship for the Performing Arts was established by the Government of Alberta in 2002 to commemorate the Queen's accession to the throne and her service to the Commonwealth.

A Scholarship of $5,000 will be awarded annually to a student in the performing arts who shows extraordinary talent and potential and who demonstrates clear educational/training goals and objectives.

Eligibility Criteria
* For the purposes of this scholarship program the performing arts shall be considered as any discipline or genre within theatre, dance and/or music.

* Applicants must be residents of Alberta. A "resident" means a person lawfully entitled to be or remain in Canada, whose primary residence has been in Alberta for at least one year prior to applying, and who ordinarily lives in Alberta.
* Students must be 25 years of age or younger and entering:

* any level of undergraduate studies; or
* equivalent in an accredited performing arts program; or
* any level of a technical performing arts school (i.e. National Theatre School, National Ballet School, Banff Centre for the Arts); or
* a recognized program or mentorship.

* The scholarship will only be granted if the applicant can prove enrollment in an acceptable program of study or mentorship. If a winning applicant is not enrolled at the time of application, Alberta Community Development will hold funds on their behalf for no more than one year.

Assessment
Assessment for the Queen's Golden Jubilee Scholarship for the Performing Arts will be made by an expert jury, with recommendations made to Alberta Foundation for
the Arts for approval. Adjudication may take up to four months. Only one award may be granted. All applicants, successful and unsuccessful, will be notified via mail. No jury comments will be provided. The general assessment criteria are:

* Merit, such as artistic, educational and/or exposure
* Impact of the project
* Reasonableness of the budget
* Ability of the applicant to carry out the proposed project

The jury may consider and applicant's:

* Level of training and experience
* Performance and achievements, both past and present
* Personal objectives

Application Requirements

Eligible students must submit the following:

· One original and three copies of the entire
application package:

* A completed and signed application form.
* A letter (maximum two pages) outlining their educational/training and artistic goals.
* A detailed description of the course of study to be undertaken.
* Applicants not already accepted into proposed study program should provide a minimum of two alternate study program choices.
* A resume or CV of no more than two pages.
* At least one letter of reference, preferably from an instructor or professional artist in the performing arts.

· Only one copy of audio and/or visual (CD, audio tape, CD Rom or video) support material. All videotapes must be VHS in North American (NTSC) format.

* Acting training: a video recording containing two monologues of contrasting style appropriate to program of study. Musical theatre applicants must submit one monologue and one song. The two pieces combined must not run longer than 10 minutes.

* Dance training: a video recording containing two dance pieces of contrasting style appropriate to program of study. The two dance pieces combined must not run longer than 6 minutes.

* Music training: a CD or 2 audio cassettes (1 for each selection) containing two musical selections of contrasting style, appropriate to the program of study.

* Related Performing Arts Disciplines: such as dance/drama/music instructors, choreographers, playwrights, composers, directors, designers, theatre technicians, audio engineers must submit a resume, portfolio, and/or audio/video samples of their work.

* If the applicant is under 18 years of age, a parent and/or a guardian must co-sign the application.

* Applicants must be 25 years or younger on or before the March 1 deadline and must provide proof of age.

* Hard copy applications will be accepted, by mail only. No faxed, computer disc or e-mailed applications will be accepted.

* Alberta Community Development shall retain custody of all materials submitted with scholarship applications.

For application assistance, please contact staff by calling  (780) 427-6315 at least two to four weeks
before the program deadline date.


The Queen's Golden Jubilee Commemorative Scholarship for the Visual Arts

Deadline: March 1.

Applications that are postmarked on or before March 1, will be
accepted. No late applications will be accepted.

Introduction
The Queen's Golden Jubilee Commemorative Scholarship for the Visual Arts was established by the Government of Alberta in 2002 to commemorate the Queen's accession to the throne and her service to the Commonwealth.

A Scholarship of $5,000 will be awarded annually to a student in the visual arts who shows extraordinary talent and potential and who demonstrates clear educational/training goals and objectives.

Eligibility Criteria
* For the purposes of this scholarship program the visual arts can include but are not restricted to: drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, clay, glass, wood, metal, fibre or any combination of these.

* Applicants must be residents of Alberta. A "resident" means a person lawfully entitled to be or remain in Canada, whose primary residence has been in Alberta for at least one year prior to applying, and who ordinarily lives in Alberta.

* Students must be 25 years of age or younger and entering any level of undergraduate studies or the equivalent in any accredited visual arts program.

* The scholarship will only be granted if the applicant can prove enrollment in an acceptable program of study or mentorship. If a winning applicant is not enrolled at the time of application, Alberta Community Development will hold funds on their behalf for no more than one year.

Assessment
Assessment for the Queen's Golden Jubilee Scholarship for the Visual Arts will be made by an expert jury, with recommendations made to Alberta Foundation for the
Arts for approval. Adjudication may take up to four months. Only one award may be granted. All applicants, successful and unsuccessful, will be notified via mail. No jury comments will be provided. The general assessment criteria are:

* Merit, such as artistic, educational and/or exposure
* Impact of the project
* Reasonableness of the budget
* Ability of the applicant to carry out the proposed project

The jury may consider and applicant's:
* Level of training and experience
* Performance and achievements, both past and present
* Personal objectives

Application Requirements
Eligible students must submit the following:

* One original and three copies of the entire
application package:

* A completed and signed application form.
* A letter (maximum two pages) outlining their educational and artistic goals.
* A detailed description of the course of study to be undertaken.
* Applicants not already accepted into proposed study program should provide a minimum of two alternate study program choices.
* A resume or CV of no more than two pages.
* One letter of reference, preferably from the following: a high school, college or university instructor in the visual arts or a professional artist working in the visual arts.

* One set of no more than 10 (ten) 35 mm slides of examples of the applicants work. Please provide a numbered inventory of all visuals submitted including title, medium, size and year of execution. All slides must have the applicant's name on them.
If more appropriate for the applicant's medium, a videotape (VHS, NTSC) of no more than five minutes, or a PC formatted disc or CD ROM, containing JPEG or GIF files in a PC format may be submitted. Check with Alberta Foundation for the
Arts for appropriate file types.

* If the applicant is under 18 years of age, a parent and/or a guardian must co-sign the application.

* Applicants must be 25 years or younger on or before March 1, and must provide proof of age.

* Hard copy applications will be accepted, by mail only. No faxed, computer disc or e-mailed applications will be accepted.

* Alberta Community Development shall retain custody of all materials submitted with scholarship applications.

1. For application assistance,  please contact staff by calling (780) 427-6315 at least two to four weeks before the program deadline date.


The Grant MacEwan Young Writer's Scholarship

Introduction

Applications are now being accepted for the Grant MacEwan Young Writer's Scholarship. This award was created by the government of Alberta to honour the life and contributions of the late Dr. Grant MacEwan. Dr. MacEwan served as both the Mayor of Calgary and Alberta's Lieutenant Governor.

He was widely known and wrote more than fifty books on subjects including nature, folklore, agriculture, politics, environment, literature, history and the people of Alberta.

Scholarships of $2,500 each are awarded annually to four young Alberta writers who create a literary work reflecting Alberta and/or Dr. MacEwan's interests.

Assessment
Assessment for the Grant MacEwan Young Writer's Scholarship will be made by an expert jury, with recommendations made to Alberta Community Development for approval. Four awards of $2,500 each will be granted. All applicants, successful and unsuccessful, will be notified via mail.

Eligibility Criteria
* Applicants must submit a short story or an essay to this competition. The work must reflect the interests of Dr. MacEwan as set out in the "Introduction" to this program.
* All work submitted must be written by an Alberta resident. A "resident" means a person lawfully entitled to be or remain in Canada, whose primary residence has been in Alberta for at least one year immediately prior to application, and who ordinarily lives in Alberta.
* Applicants may submit their work in either English or French.
* Applicants must be between the ages of 16 and 25 as of December 31 of the application year.
* Any work submitted must be original and written solely by the applicant. Any applicant who submits a work that is not original, commits plagiarism, or violates the Copyright Act of Canada will be considered ineligible and the work subject to rejection.
* Applicants must submit work between 1,000 and 5,000 words in length. Works under or over this amount may be considered ineligible.
* The scholarship will only be granted if the applicant can prove enrollment in an acceptable program of study or mentorship. If a winning applicant is not enrolled at the time of application, funds will be held on their behalf by Alberta Community Development for no more than three years.

Application Requirements
* A completed and signed application form.
* If under 18 years of age, a parent and/or guardian must co-sign the application.
* Work is to be submitted on white, 8 1/2 x 11 paper, single-sided, double-spaced, in 12-pt. type in a bound (stapled or cerlox) form.
* A letter (maximum 2 pages) answering the following questions: who you are; where you are from; what (if any) previous writing experience you have; what interests you in writing; how does your essay/short story reflect Dr. MacEwan's interests; how you will use the scholarship to improve your writing skills if you are the successful applicant.
* One letter of reference, preferably from one of the following: a high school, college or university instructor in English or Creative Writing; a published author, journalist,
bona fide publisher, or similar professional working in the literary arts.
* Hard copy applications will be accepted, by mail only. No faxed, disk, or e-mail submissions will be accepted.
* Deadline for submission is December 31 of each year.
* Four copies of all material (letter, essay/short story, reference letter, and application form) to Alberta Community Development. Please note that reference letters should not be sent under separate cover but photocopied and submitted with the application.
* All application material, including writing samples, will not be returned.

Submit to:
Alberta Community Development
901 Standard Life Centre
10405 Jasper Ave
Edmonton AB T5J 4R7


The Alberta Foundation for the Arts has consolidated its scholarship grant programs under the new program:

Grants to Individuals.

Deadlines: February 15 and September 15.

Purpose: To assist the professional/creative development of individuals by enabling them to conduct projects in the area of art production, training/career development, marketing/travel and research related to any arts discipline. Eligible applicants must be resident Alberta artists planning to undertake projects in the arts. Eligible activities include projects in any discipline that supports the creative development of the
individual artist.

Amount of assistance: Up to 100% of project expenses to a maximum of $20,000. This is a juried program (i.e., applications are assessed by a panel of jurors).

Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund
Students Finance Board
6th Floor, Sterling Place
9940 - 106 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T5K 2V1

Phone: (780) 427-8640


Alberta College of Art and Design

Artstream is an upgrading program for those who demonstrate artisitic ability but who do not meet Alberta College of Art & Design's academic and/or English proficiency requirements

Grant money is available covering living expenses, tuition and supplies if you are eligible

Contact: (403) 284-7600 or 1-800-251-8290


Aboriginal Health Bursary Program - Alberta

Apply by May 15

Partnership program with Alberta Health and Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund.

Designed to provide funding for Aboriginal students in Alberta to pursue post-secondary education in a health field.

Awards valued up to $12,000 for college/technical programs or $13,000 for university programs.

Up to 20 awards will be available annually.

Applicants must be Indian, Inuit or Metis and have been a resident of Alberta for 3 years.

Must be enrolled or will be enrolled in a health field at the college, technical institute or university level and demonstrate financial need.

Have maintained full-time enrollment (60% of a full course load) and passing marks in all courses in their previous year of study if they are entering their second or subsequent year

Contact: Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund,
6th Floor, 9940 - 106 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5K 2V1

Phone: (780) 427-8640


Alberta Energy Company Limited

Native Scholarship Award

Value: Five (5) $3,500 scholarships each year.

Must be accepted into the oil and gas industry at an accredited technical
school, college or university.

Candidates must have resided in Northwest Territories, British Columbia,
Alberta or other areas where AEC has an operation interest.

Applications are available by contacting:

Alberta Energy Company Ltd.
3900 - 421 - 7 Ave S.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2P 4K9
Fax: (403) 266- 8212


Weyerhaeuser Canada Scholarships - Alberta

Each year, Weyerhaeuser Canada offers scholarships to young men and women from the Peace Country and Grande Cache, Alberta who are furthering their education in Commerce, Engineering, and Forestry. Tweleve awards of $1,000 each are awarded to nine high school graduates and three first-year college graduates enrolled at a university, college or techinical institute in Alberta. Of the nine awards to high school students , one will be offered to a student of Native ancestry (Métis, Indian, Inuit).

High School Awards: Deadline July 15

Peace Wapiti School Board #33,
8611A-103 Street
Grande Prairie, Alberta T8V 4C5

College Awards: Deadline April 15

Awards Advisory Committee,
Grande Prairie Regional College
10726-106 Avenue,
Grande Prairie, Alberta T8V 4C4


Alberta Law Foundation Scholarship - University of Lethbridge:

Deadline May 31

One annual award of $5,000 is available to an Aboriginal student entering first year at the Faculty of Law on the basis of academic standing. The award is renewable in the sum of $3,500 per year for a further two years subject to the recipient maintaining a satisfactory academic standing.

No additional documentation is required to apply. Your application to the Faculty automatically is considered as an application for the Law Foundation Scholarship.

Undergraduate Awards for Native American Students

Bobby-Jo Stannard: stanrj@hg.uleth.ca

There are several Undergraduate scholarship opportunities for students of Native American descent at the University of Lethbridge (for example;

Peigan Nation Scholarship, Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Native American Studies, Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Fine Arts). The terms of reference for these scholarships can be found in the back of the UofL Calander. Applications for the UofL Undergraduate Awards are available at the Financial Aid and Student Awards Office (SU047).


Native Foundation Trust Bursary - Grande Prairie Friendship Centre

For high school students entering an arts, science or business program at a recognized educational institute.

Amount: The number and amount of bursaries vary from year to year.

Eligibility: Must have attended a recognized educational facility within Grande Prairie and area. Academic standing. Financial need.

Duration: N/A.

Deadline: October 15th of each year.

Information: CEO
Grande Prairie Friendship Centre
10507 98th Avenue
Grande Prairie, Alberta T8V 4L1
Phone: (780) 532-5722
Fax: (780) 539-5121


Senator James Gladstone Memorial Scholarship - Alberta Indian Investment Corp.

To recognize excellence and achievement by a Treaty Indian and to encourage and assist Treaty Indians in the pursuit of post-secondary education in the area of business, finance or economics.

Amount: Maximum of $750 for students enrolled in colleges and technical institutions. Maximum of $1,000 for students enrolled in universities.

Eligibility: Treaty Indian and resident of Alberta.

Enrolled full time at a college, university or technical school in one of the following programs:

1. Commerce 2. Business 3. Administration 4. Accounting 5. Small business.

Personal and academic objectives, particularly as they relate to Aboriginal economic and business development in Canada.

Application Deadline: Varies

Information:
General Manager
Alberta Indian Investment Corporation
P.O. Box 577
Winterburn, Alberta T0E 2N0

Phone: (780) 470-3600
Fax: (780) 470-3605


Aboriginal Business Leadership Awards

Amount: Minimum of 4 @ $1,500 each annually

Deadline: June 15

Conditions: Self-employed Aboriginal students and 2nd or mature Aboriginal students who are attending a public post-secondary educational institution in Alberta and enrolled in a program leading to a certificate, diploma, or degree in a business or commerce.


Alberta Heritage Scholarships

Alberta Scholarship Programs:

High School

Undergraduate

Graduate

Citizenship

Career Development

Student Athletes

Endowment Programs

Alberta Blue Cross

Alberta Scholarship Programs

To stimulate the pursuit of excellence by recognizing outstanding achievement and by encouraging and assisting Albertans to achieve their fullest potential.

Alberta Scholarship Programs For High School Students
Alexander Rutherford Scholarships for High School Achievement

More than 6,000 scholarships available to students achieving a minimum average of 80 percent in five designated subjects in grades 10, 11, 12:

$300 for grade 10; $500 for grade 11 and $700 for Grade 12 with a total value of up to $1,500.

Applicants must be Alberta residents who plan to enrol or are enrolled in a full-time post-secondary program of at least one semester in length.

Application deadline: May 1 for September entry; December 1 for January entry

Alberta Scholarship Programs
9th Floor, 9940-106 Street,
Box 28000 Station Main,
Edmonton AB T5J 4R4
Phone: (780) 427-8640
(In Alberta, but outside Edmonton dial 310-0000)


Rutherford Scholars

Top ten students graduating from grade 12, as determined solely on the basis of Diploma Examination results in English 30 or Francais 30, Social Studies 30 and three other subjects

Recipients will receive a plaque and $1,500 in addition to their Alexander Rutherford Scholarship

Application deadline: candidates will be selected from Alexander Rutherford Scholarship applications received prior to August 1


United World College Scholarships

Based on academic ability, leadership capability, references and an interview are awarded annually for two years of study at United World Colleges

Applicants must be Alberta residents in the process of completed Grade 11

Application deadline: March 1 for study commencing September of the same year


Adult High School Equivalency Scholarships

200 awards valued at $500

You are eligible if you've been out of school for three years, have achieved a minimum average of 80 percent as a full-time student in courses required for entry into a post-secondary program

Must be nominated by their institution by September 1

 


Alberta Scholarship Programs For Citizenship

High School Citizenship Awards

One graduating student from each high school is recognized for outstanding characteristics in the areas of academic ability, leadership in school-sponsored, community or extracurricular activities, and a demonstrated willingness to place the good of others above personal ambitions. Nominations will be made by each high school and recipients will receive a plaque and letter of commendation.

Nominations will be made by May 1 and recipients will receive a plaque and letter of commendation.


Alberta Scholarship Programs For Undergraduate Students

Louise McKinney Post Secondary Scholarships

Louise McKinney Post-Secondary Scholarships
Approximately 930 scholarships are available to reward students for their academic achievements and to encourage continued undergraduate study. Scholarships are valued at $1,500 at the undergraduate level and $3,500 for professional programs such as medicine, law, veterinary medicine, optometry, chiropractic and dentistry. Students enrolled in programs within the province are nominated by the awards office of their institution. Albertans enrolled in programs outside the province because their program of study is not offered in Alberta, should contact this office.

Application deadline: June 1


Alberta Women's Secretariat "Persons Case" Scholarships

To recognize students whose studies will contribute to the advancement of women or who are studying in fields where members of their sex are traditionally few in number

Awards range from $1,000 to $5,000

Application deadline: September 30


Charles S. Noble Scholarships for Study at Harvard

Three scholarships of $10,000 are awarded to Alberta students for undergraduate study at Harvard. The awards are co-sponsored by the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and an endowment established by Edmonton businessman Sandy Mactaggart.

Application deadline: May 15


Charles S. Noble Scholarships for Student Leadership

A total of 80 awards valued at $300 each are available to recognize outstanding leadership in the areas of student government, student societies, clubs or organizations at the post-secondary level.

Application deadline: March 1


 

"Persons Case" Scholarships

These awards recognize students whose studies will contribute to the advancement of women, or who are studying in fields where members of their sex are traditionally few in number. Selection is based on program of studies, academic achievement and financial need. Awards range in value from $1,000 to $5,000. A maximum of $20,000 is available each year.

Application deadline: September 30


Alberta Scholarship programs For Graduate Students

Sir James Lougheed Awards of Distinction

Fifteen awards are available to recognize academic excellence and provide Albertans with the opportunity for advanced study at institutions outside of the province. Scholarships are valued at $10,000 for master's and $15,000 for doctoral level study.

Application deadline: February 1


Ralph Steinhauer Awards of Distinction

Fifteen awards are available to recognize exceptional academic achievement of students studying within Alberta. Applicants must be Canadian residents who are enrolled or intending to enrol at an institution in Alberta. Scholarships are valued at $10,000 for study at the master's level, and $15,000 for doctoral level study.

Application deadline: February 1


Alberta Ukrainian Centennial Commemorative Scholarships

Two awards are available to provide academic opportunities for a student from Ukraine to study in Alberta and for a student from Alberta to study in Ukraine. Scholarships are for graduate level study, and will be awarded every second year.

Application deadline: February 1


Government of Alberta Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships

Approximately 130 awards are available annually to provide the incentive and means for Canadians to pursue graduate study at Alberta post-secondary institutions. Scholarships are valued at up to $9,300 and fellowships at up to $10,500. Nominations are made by each graduate faculty in Alberta.

Nomination deadline: students should consult their faculty of graduate studies



Alberta Scholarship Programs
Alberta Scholarship Programs
9th Floor, 9940-106 Street,
Box 28000 Station Main,
Edmonton AB T5J 4R4
Phone: (780) 427-8640

Aboriginal Health Careers Bursary

Application deadline: May 15
Approximately 20 bursaries are available for aboriginal students in Alberta entering their second or subsequent year of post-secondary education in a health field. Applicants must be Indian, Inuit or Métis and have been residents of Alberta for a minimum of three years prior to applying. Awards are valued at up to $12,000/year for college programs, and $13,000/year for university programs.


The Alberta Press Council Scholarship

Application deadline: January 15
One scholarship of $1,000 is awarded yearly to an Alberta high school student enrolling in post-secondary studies. The award is based on the applicant's ability to write an essay on a specified topic. Application forms are available from high school counsellors and the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund.


Janet and Horace Allen Scholarship
Application deadline: June 1
One scholarship of $1,500 will be awarded to the top science graduate from Crowsnest Pass High School who is an Alberta resident and has enrolled full-time in a post-secondary institution. Application forms are available from the school counsellor.
Theodore R. Campbell Scholarship

Nomination deadline: Contact the registrars office at Blue Quills First Nations College.
One scholarship valued at $1,500 will be awarded for an aboriginal student studying Education at Blue Quills First Nations College. Applicants must be Alberta residents and in their second year of the Blue Quills University Transfer program.


CANA Scholarships

Application deadline: October 31
The CANA Scholarships were designed to recognize and reward the exceptional academic achievement of children of CANA employees. Applicants must be Alberta residents entering their second or subsequent year of study at an eligible institution. One award of $1,500 and two awards of $1,000 are available each year. Application forms are available from CANA and from the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund


Robert C. Carson Memorial Bursary

Nomination deadline: Students should contact the financial aid office of their institution.
Five awards valued at $500 are available to aboriginal Albertans without sponsorship enrolled full-time in their second year of the Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Diploma or Faculty of Law programs at eligible institutions.


Hal Harrison Memorial Scholarship

Application deadline: June 1
One award of $250 is available to the grade twelve student with the highest marks who is enrolled full-time at a post-secondary institution and one of their parents is a member in good standing with the Alberta Volunteer Fire Fighters Association.


The Helen and George Kilik Scholarship

Application deadline: Contact school
This scholarship was developed to assist a student from Olds High School in establishing himself in his career. The recipient must be an Alberta resident who has completed all of his high school studies at Olds High School. The school will select the recipient based on financial need, involvement in extra-curricular activities and academic achievement. The award is valued at $1,000

Anna & John Kolesar Memorial Scholarship

Application deadline: July 1
One scholarship valued at $1,200 will be awarded to the applicant with the highest academic average in three designated subjects as shown on an Alberta Education Transcript. Applicants must be Alberta residents, planning to enrol in a Faculty of Education, and from a family where neither parent has a university degree.


Hal Neldner Scholarships and Telus Bursaries

Application deadline: June 1
Two scholarships for the top high school graduates, two for the top post-secondary students and two random bursaries all valued at $1,500 will be awarded to students whose parents are employed by Telus and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Applicants must reside in Alberta and be enrolled full-time in a post-secondary program. Application forms are available through Telus-Human Resources Section, high school counsellors, and the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund.


The Robin Rousseau Memorial Mountain Achievement Scholarship

Application deadline: January 30
This scholarship was developed to recognize excellence in leadership development and safety in the mountain community. Applicants must be Alberta resident's, active in the mountain community and must be planning on taking a recognized Mountain Leadership and Safety certification program. One recipient will be chosen each year by a selection committee who will look at each applicant's work record, volunteer activities, personal goals and how these relate to mountain safety. The selection committee will determine the value of the award and the recipient will be reimbursed this amount after they complete their program.


Dr. Robert and Anna Shaw Scholarships

Application deadline: June 1
Awards are available to students graduating from Sexsmith Secondary School to continue in post-secondary studies based on their high school accomplishments. Two different types of scholarships are available. Students should contact the counsellor at the school for more information.


Staples Scholarship

Application deadline: June 30
Two scholarships valued at $2,000 each will be awarded to the top two applicants entering an eligible program. Applicants must be Alberta residents, planning to enrol in a Faculty of Business or Commerce. Averages are calculated based on the final marks in five designated grade 12 courses.


Alberta Scholarship Program For Student Athletes
Jimmie Condon Athletic Scholarships

Approximately 1,400 scholarships valued at $1,000 each are awarded to students at universities, colleges, and technical institutes who are members of designated teams, maintaining an average of at least 65 percent and enrolled as full-time students.

Nomination deadline: November 1


Charles S. Noble Junior Football Scholarships

A total of 30 scholarships valued at $1,000 each are awarded to junior football players who are currently enrolled full-time in a post-secondary institution in Alberta and are nominated by their team. The awards are co-sponsored by the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and the three Alberta teams in the Junior Football League.

Application deadline: October 1


Charles S. Noble Junior 'A' Hockey Scholarships

Five scholarships of $650 are awarded to individuals who have participated in Junior "A" Hockey and who are currently enrolled in full-time post-secondary study in Alberta. Nominations are made by their respective team. The awards are co-sponsored by the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund and the Junior "A" Hockey League.

Application deadline: December 1, April 1, and August 1


Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund Career Development Scholarships

Michael Luchkovich Scholarships for Career Development

These awards are given to individuals who have demonstrated outstanding ability in their work and are pursuing short-term, full-time study of less than six months or part-time study. Applicants must have worked in Alberta for a minimum of three years. Awards assist with direct educational costs.

Application deadline: December 1, April 1 and August 1

For more information or to apply for any scholarships on this page please contact:

Alberta Scholarship Programs
9th Floor, 9940-106 Street,
Box 28000 Station Main,
Edmonton AB T5J 4R4
Phone: (780) 427-8640
(In Alberta, but outside Edmonton dial 310-0000)

 

BC Scholarships

YVR Art Foundation - 2015 Youth Scholarship and Mid-Career Artist Scholarship awards for BC First Nations artists

The YVR Art Foundation is now accepting applications for the
2015 Youth Scholarship and Mid-Career Artist Scholarship awards for BC First Nations artists.

Each award is valued at $5,000. Up to eight YVR Art Foundation Youth Scholarships and up to three Mid-Career Artist Scholarships will be awarded. In addition, scholarship recipients will have the opportunity to exhibit their work at the Vancouver International Airport (YVR) for one year.

The deadline for applications is Friday, January 30th, 2015.

Eligibility and criteria for the two scholarships include:

YVR Art Foundation Youth Scholarship:

Eligible Applicants:
• Are of BC First Nations ancestry
• Reside in BC and are between the ages of 16 and 26
• Are emerging artists whose artwork reflects the art forms of the BC First Nations
• Have the goal of becoming a professional artist
• Are accepted to study with a mentor or at a formal institution of learning
• Commit to attend the Scholarship Award ceremony in Vancouver on May 29th 2015 and the ceremony in recognition of the completed work, one year later, on May 27th 2016.

YVR Art Foundation Mid-Career Artist Scholarship:
Eligible Applicants:
• Are of BC First Nations ancestry
• Reside in BC and are age 27 or older
• Create artwork that reflects the art forms of the BC First Nations
• Wish to further their art careers and/or extend their work into a new scale or medium
• Have completed basic art training
• Have achieved local and/or provincial recognition through public presentation of their artwork.
• Are accepted to study/work with an master artist; at a formal institution of learning; or on a special project that is of cultural significance to the artist’s community
• Are able to submit a portfolio of artwork that demonstrates the artist’s commitment to their practice

Complete information on the YVR Art Foundation and its scholarship programs, including Application Guidelines and online and PDF Application Forms, can be found on the Foundation website: www.yvraf.com/programs.
Please forward this email and document to anyone you think may be interested in applying for these awards. If you have any questions, please contact the YVR Art Foundation at info@yvraf.com or phone 604-276-6261.

 


Dr. Joseph and Rosalie Segal Award | Justice Institute of British Columbia

 

The Dr. Joseph and Dr. Rosalie Segal Award supports students studying counseling in trauma and child abuse; and, Aboriginal students.

Value: Five awards of $4,000 each are available annually.

Who Should Apply

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Students pursuing programs in the subject area of counselling in trauma and child abuse OR Aboriginal learners pursuing careers in any JIBC program area
  • Demonstrate the impact your education will have on you and your community
  • Demonstrate the difference a Segal Award would make if received

Upcoming Deadline: April 2015

Download Application form: Application.pdf

If you are unable to submit the fillable form, you can print a copy and scan/email applications to financialaid@jibc.ca or mail to:

Financial Aid and Awards
Justice Institute of British Columbia
715 McBride Boulevard
New Westminster, BC
V3L 5T4


Minerva Foundation Award for Aboriginal Women | Justice Institute of British Columbia

Minerva Foundation for BC Women is a registered charitable organization with a vision of changing the face of leadership in BC. This award is a result of the generosity of the Minerva's Combining Our Strength Initiative™in partnership with the JIBC Foundation.

Value: Four awards of $4,000 each are available annually.

Who Should Apply

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • be an Aboriginal female BC resident
  • demonstrate financial need
  • demonstrate academic proficiency
  • demonstrate community engagement
  • meet at least one of the following criteria:
    • a single mother advancing her education
    • a mature woman returning to the workforce after a long absence
    • a woman with a disability overcoming education barriers

Upcoming Deadline: April 2015

Application

Click here to download the application in PDF fillable format.  If you are unable to submit the fillable form, you can print a copy and scan/email applications to financialaid@jibc.ca or mail to:

Financial Aid and Awards
Justice Institute of British Columbia
715 McBride Boulevard
New Westminster, BC
V3L 5T4


Marvin and Colette Storrow Bursary | Justice Institute of British Columbia

Marvin and Colette Storrow are longtime supporters of JIBC.  A senior litigator with Blakes law firm, Marvin has been recognized time and again for his outstanding service to the legal community. Marvin and Colette established this bursary in 2012 to provide tuition support for Aboriginal students towards a JIBC certificate, diploma or degree program.

Value: Two awards of $500 each are available annually.

Who Should Apply

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Applicants must be Aboriginal students enrolling in an individual course, which may be applied towards a JIBC certificate, diploma or degree program.
  • Applicants have a demonstrated financial need not met by other available sources of funding, including student loans, grants, sponsorship, work income, etc.
  • Applicants must document financial need by completing the application form and signing the declaration. Supporting documentation may be requested to verify information contained in the application form.
  • Preference will be given to students involved in school or community activities, volunteer work and/or Aboriginal cultural events.

Upcoming Deadline: April 2015

Application

Click here to download the application in PDF fillable format.  If you are unable to submit the fillable form, you can print a copy and scan/email applications to financialaid@jibc.ca or mail to:

Financial Aid and Awards
Justice Institute of British Columbia
715 McBride Boulevard
New Westminster, BC
V3L 5T4


Safetek Bursary | Justice Institute of British Columbia

Safetek is Canada's leading provider of firefighting and rescue apparatus. For more than twenty years, the Canadian Fire Service has come to count on Safetek as their source of high quality emergency service apparatus. Safetek established this bursary in 2012 with the purpose of providing financial support for Aboriginal Students in the Career Fire Fighter Pre-Employment Certificate program.

Value: One award of $1,000 is available annually.

Who Should Apply

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Be an Aboriginal learner
  • Be accepted or in the process of applying to the Career Fire Fighter Pre-Employment Certificate Program
  • Demonstrate financial need not met by other available sources of funding, including: student loans, grants, sponsorship, work income, etc.

Upcoming Deadline: April 2015

Application

Click here to download the application in PDF fillable format.  If you are unable to submit the fillable form, you can print a copy and scan/email applications to financialaid@jibc.ca or mail to:

Financial Aid and Awards
Justice Institute of British Columbia
715 McBride Boulevard
New Westminster, BC
V3L 5T4

 


Vern and Maureen Campbell Bursary | Justice Institute of British Columbia

Vern and Maureen Campbell are longtime supporters of JIBC. Vern served the Vancouver Police Department for 30 years, retiring from his position of Superintendent in 1994. Vern and Maureen established this bursary in 2012 to provide financial support for Aboriginal youths (30 and under) for students attending a JIBC program of at least 10 credits.

Value: One award of $1,000 is available annually.

Who Should Apply

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Be an Aboriginal youth (30 years and under).
  • Applicants must demonstrate financial need not met by other available sources of funding including grants, sponsorship, work income etc.
  • Applicants must document financial need by completing the application form and signing the declaration. Supporting documentation may be requested to verify information contained in the application form.

Upcoming Deadline: April 2015

Application

Click here to download the application in PDF fillable format.  If you are unable to submit the fillable form, you can print a copy and scan/email applications to financialaid@jibc.ca or mail to:

Financial Aid and Awards
Justice Institute of British Columbia
715 McBride Boulevard
New Westminster, BC
V3L 5T4


The Irving K. Barber BC Scholarship Society

The BC Aboriginal Student Award was established in 2008 as part of the Provincial Government's strategy to improve Aboriginal access and achievement. Its purpose is to support Aboriginal people in getting post-secondary education by reducing financial barriers.

The Scholarship Society administers the program in partnership with the Victoria Foundation. Awards of $1,000 - $3,500 are available for Aboriginal people pursuing post-secondary education that is at least nine weeks long.

Read about previous award recipients here.

The new Aboriginal Teacher Education Award supports Aboriginal students enrolled in a teacher education program at a public post-secondary in British Columbia. Awards will be $5,000 annually for a maximum of four years.

http://www.bcscholarship.ca/web/aboriginal


All Nations Trust Company Endowment Fund Awards

All Nations Trust Company has developed annual, educational achievement awards to reward and recognize Aboriginal Secondary and Post Secondary Students who are committed to attaining personal and educational success. These awards are open to individuals who are currently living within or are originally from one of the following Tribal Regions: Kootenay, Lillooet, Okanagan, Shuswap, Thompson.

Secondary School Awards: The "Messenger Award" was established to recognize graduating high school students who have demonstrated goal orientation, leadership and commitment to the Aboriginal Community. Each year All Nations Trust Company will present five "Messenger Awards" in the amount of $400.00 each to one student in each of the above five regions. To qualify for this award, students must be graduating from high school in the current year and registered in a Post Secondary Institute for the following term on a full time basis.

Post Secondary School Awards: All Nations Trust Company will be presenting a total of ten awards in the amount of $500.00 each on an annual basis, to two Post Secondary Students in each of the above five regions. These awards are designed to reward academic achievements and assist Aboriginal students in their pursuit of Post Secondary education.

Criteria:
1) Applicants must be graduating from high school and/or be registered in a Post Secondary Institution in the following year on a full time basis in any discipline or field of study.
2) Applicants must be of Aboriginal ancestry. (Status, Non-Status, Metis, or Inuit).
3) Applicants may live on or off reserve and must currently live within or are originally from one of the following Tribal Regions: Kootenay, Lillooet, Okanagan, Shuswap and Thompson.

Evaluation Criteria:
1) Community Involvement and Personal Achievements
2) Academic Achievement and Grade Point Average ("GPA")
3) Work Experience
4) Personal and Professional Recommendations

Forward Applications to:

All Nations Trust Company
Suite 208 West, 345 Yellowhead Highway
Kamloops, BC
V2H 1H1
Telephone: (250) 828-9770
Toll Free: 1-800-663-2959
Fax: (250) 372-2585
e-mail: antco@antco.bc.ca


Camosum College Cenanelen Bursary for First Nations Students
This bursary is no longer being offered.


Aboriginal Graduate Scholarship in Economics - University of Victoria

Application deadlines:
Graduate Students - January 30.
Undergraduate Students - May 30

Terms of Reference: A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an Aboriginal Graduate student entering the Department of Economics. If there is no eligible graduate student then the scholarship will be awarded to an Aboriginal undergraduate student entering the Department of Economics (that is the undergraduate student has declared Economics as their Major, or Honours, programme).

Applications can be requested from the Department in person, 
by telephone (250) 721-8532
or email: jnixon@uvic.ca.

 


First Citizens Fund - Student Bursary Program

Objective: To provide financial assistance to eligible Aboriginal students enrolled in post-secondary education programs.

Number: Varies

Value: Maximum $2,000 per year
(Students receiving assistance from their Band or Tribal Council are eligible for a maximum of $700 per academic year.)

Criteria: Bursaries are available to assist Aboriginal post-secondary students that are normally a resident of BC and are attending a recognized university or college on a full-time basis.

Applicants for the bursary program must be registered in a minimum two-year academic program and must maintain an average of C+ or 2.5 GPA.

Bursary levels are determined by the financial needs of each student but the maximum bursary students can receive is $2,000 per academic year, and this is paid only after the receipt of official transcripts.

The BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres (BCAAFC), under contract with the Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women's Services, currently administers the Student Bursary Program.

BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres
200 - 506 Fort Street
Victoria, BC V8W 1E6
Phone: 250 388-5522
Fax: 250 388-5502
Toll Free: 1-800-990-2432


£ãni Etiè Tahltan Scholarship

Value: $300.00

The £ãni Etiè Tahltan Scholarship was established by Louise Framst
Books as a keet' for those who contributed to the Tahltan Cookbook
series and to acknowledge the collective knowledge of the Tahltan
people( which makes up the heart of this cookbook series).

The scholarship is to go to a student of Tahltan descent who has demonstrated achievement in all areas: academics, athletics, art and citizenship in home and community.

Note: More than one scholarship may be given out in a year.

To qualify, a student must be of Tahltan descent and enrol in a post-secondary program
Fill out the Stikine Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards Form and attach a document which:
a) Traces Tahltan ancestry
b) Includes an essay of 500 words or less, discussing the meaning of
£ãni Etiè and how it applies to themselves, stressing all-round personal
development.

Considerations:

The successful candidate(s) writes a letter of appreciation, indicating personal achievement and a photograph, which will become part of a permanent record.

Send to: Louise Framst,
Box 52, Cecil Lake, BC VOC 1GO.

The successful candidate(s) sends a copy of registration in courses or institution to:
Stikine Scholarship Committee,
School District #87 (Stikine),
Box 190, Dease Lake, BC VOC 1LO
Phone: (250) 771-4440


Chief Joe Mathias BC Aboriginal Scholarship

Eligible applicants are members of a BC First Nation who are in financial need and demonstrate merit with respect to accessing post-secondary education including:

* Courses of study towards a degree, or a certificate or diploma, at an eligible post-secondary education institution; or

* Post-graduate studies in an eligible post-secondary educational institution.

Information:
Chief Joe Mathias BC Aboriginal Scholarship
c/o Deloitte & Touche
P.O. Box 49279, Four Bentall Centre
2100 - 1055 Dunsmuir Street
Vancouver, BC V7X 1P4


Coast Ferries (1937 - 1997) Scholarship - Vancouver Community College.

Value: One award $1,500 annually credit toward tuition fees.

Eligibility: Available to students in the outer Mid-Coast communities of Bella Bella (Waglisia), Klemtu, Shearwater, Ocean Falls, Rivers Inlet/Oweekeno, Dawson's Landing (Rivers Inlet) and Kingcome Inlet.

Not available to students who permanently reside in Bella Coola. Must have supporting letter from their local First Nations Council and/or School District #49. Selection to be made by VCC

Application:
To the Dean of Student Service
Vancouver Community College
250 West Pender Street
Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 1S9

Information:
Rebecca Davey
Development Officer
Vancouver Community College Foundation
1155 East Broadway
PO Box 24620 Stn. "F"
Vancouver, British Columbia V5N 5T9

Phone: (604)871-7148
e-mail: rdavey@vcc.bc.ca


Hughes Aircraft of Canada Native / Indian Scholarship - Simon Fraser University

To a Native undergraduate student at Simon Fraser University.

Value: One award of $750

Eligibility: Native undergraduate student. High academic standing.
Preference given to students majoring in:
. Engineering science
. Computing science
. Mathematics
. Physics
. Business administration.
Full-time student at Simon Fraser University.

Deadline: The end of the second week of classes in a given semester.

Information:
Financial Assistance
3017 Academic Quadrangle
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6

Phone: (604) 291-3892
Fax: (604)291-4722


Raytheon System's Canada Ltd. Scholarship for Native Students - Simon Fraser University

One award valued at $750

A Native undergraduate student with high academic standingat Simon Fraser University. Preference will be given to students majoring in Engineering Science, Computing Science, Mathematics, Physics or Business
Administration.

Apply to:
Simon Fraser University,
Student Services and Registrar
Burnaby, British Columbia
Tel: (604) 291-4356


Robert Allison Bursary for Non-Status Indians - Okanagan University College

Description: Enables deserving students to begin or continue attendance at Okanagan University College.

Value: The annual income from a bequest may be divided or awarded to a single applicant at the discretion of the selection committee.

Eligibility: Native descent Applicant's circumstances make it necessary to be self-supporting. Available to students at any College Centre.

Duration: N/A.

Deadline: May 31 of each year

Information: Financial Awards Office
Okanagan University College
1000 K.L.O. Road
Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 4X8

Phone: (250) 862-5419
Fax: (250) 862-5466


Vicki Hitchen Memorial Scholarship - Okanagan University College

If you are a member of the Adams Lake Indian Band, Neskonlith Indian Band, Little Shuwsap Indian Band, Spallumcheen Indian Band or Okanagan Indian Band and if you are planning to continue University or College education next year, you may wish to apply for the Vicki Hitchen Memorial Scholarship.

This is a $1,000 scholarship* available to an Aboriginal Canadian currently attending OUC. Applications are available from the Financial Awards Office, or at any OUC campus office.

*Amount may vary slightly depending upon interest actually earned by the endowment fund.

Information: Financial Awards Office
Okanagan University College
1000 K.L.O. Road
Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 4X8

Phone: (250) 862-5419
Fax: (250) 862-5466


Interior Aboriginal Endowment Fund Award - Okanagan University College

The Interior Aboriginal Endowment Fund Award has been established by the
Interior Aboriginal Business Services Society to provide annual awards for Aboriginal students. Recipients will be permanent residents of B.C. and will be enrolled full-time in any year of a degree, diploma or certificate program at any centre of OUC. Selection of the award recipient will be based on a combination of academic achievement and financial need, with emphasis on financial need.

Information: Financial Awards Office
Okanagan University College
1000 K.L.O. Road
Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 4X8

Phone: (250) 862-5419
Fax: (250) 862-5466


McCarthy Tetrault Annual Scholarship - UNBC

One (1) valued at $750

Available to full-time First Nations student enrolled in Northern Advancemenmt Program. Recipient must be resident of northern British Columbia as defined by UNBC Act.

For information on all UNBC
Scholarships please contact:
Linda Roa, UNBC Financial Aid Office
3333 University Way,
Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9


Bank of Montreal Aboriginal Scholarship - UNBC

One (1) valued at $1,500

Available to full-time First Nations student enrolled in Northern Advancemenmt Program. Recipient must be resident of northern British Columbia as defined by UNBC Act. Must have completed at least 60 credit hours towards Bachelor of Commerce degree.

For information on all UNBC
Scholarships please contact:
Linda Roa, UNBC Financial Aid Office
3333 University Way,
Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9


Canfor Corporation Scholarships - UNBC

Three(3) valued at $3,000

Must have completed at least 60 credit hours towards Natural Resources and Environmental Studies program. Preference to dependent relatives of Canfor employees or to First Nations students.

For information on all UNBC
Scholarships please contact:
Linda Roa, UNBC Financial Aid Office
3333 University Way,
Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9


BC Hydro Aboriginal Scholarship Program

To encourage and financially assist Aboriginal people to pursue post-secondary education in disciplines relevant to BC Hydro and, where possible, to provide recipients with work experience.

Value: Eight scholarships of $1,000 each.

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Inuit or Métis. Has successfully completed the first year of a full time post-secondary program in a discipline relevant to a broad range of BC Hydro careers.

Good academic standing (preferably 75% grade point average) in addition to good written communications skills.
Balanced lifestyle (i.e., fitness, community involvement, hobbies and interests).
Supported by a British Columbia First Nation or Native organization.

Deadline: Mid-January

Information:
Outreach Programs
BC Hydro
16th Floor, 333 Dunsmuir St.
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 5R3

Phone: (604) 623-3994
Fax: (604) 623-3614

E-mail: diane.walton@bchydro.com


Mungo Martin Memorial Awards - British Columbia

To assist people of Native descent to further their education, vocational training, skills and competence. These awards are not only open to those who wish to further their general education and skills, but are available to those who seek to do creative work to further the artistic heritage of the Native peoples in their paintings, carving, music, dance, folklore or language.

Value: Normally from $100 to $500.
Number of awards and award amounts depend on the funds available.

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry.
Living in British Columbia at the time of application.
Preference will be given to young people.
Must be a student at an accredited university or college.
Must complete application form, provide two references and supply an official copy of transcripts.

Duration: Recipients may apply for further award in a subsequent year.

Deadline: May be received at any time for consideration at periodic meetings of the Board.

Information: Lucy Galloway
P.O. Box 883
Qualicum Beach, British Columbia V9K 1T2

Phone: (250) 752-8785
Fax: (250) 752-3076


Weyerhaeuser Canada BC Division Education Awards

Value: Two awards valued at $2000 each.

Eligibility: Aboriginals, women, visible minorities persons with disabilities. Enrolled in University program relevant to a career at Weyerhaeuser.

Deadline: June 30

Diversity Education Awards Program
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.
P.O. Box 800
Kamloops, BC V2C 5M7

 


CASTS Scholarships

The Canadian Aboriginal Science and Technology Society CASTS Scholarship Programs


Deadline June 15
CASTS scholarships are awarded to post-secondary graduate and undergraduate students for leadership and academic achievement. Awards are made possible by individuals who wish to support the advancement of Canadian Aboriginal people. Recipients cannot receive more than one scholarship per year. Students who are members of CASTS will be given first priority, however, all students are encouraged to apply and submit application by June 15 of each year.

Website: <a href="http://www.casts.ca/scholarships.htm

Eastern Scholarships

Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline Scholarship & Academic Achievement Awards

Committed to the educational advancements of Mi’kmaq youth within Nova Scotia, the partners agreed to work toward helping Mi’kmaw youth set their goals by recognizing and encouraging their Academic Achievement Awards (high school) and 77 University Scholarships including 3 at the Masters/Doctorate Level.

Application deadline: Scholarship – June 17.
Academic Achievement Awards – July 15.

For more information & to apply, contact the following: www.mnpp.com

Email: ssbear@spectraenergy.com

 


First Nations & Indigenous Black Students Entrance Scholarship - Dalhousie University

Value: Ten renewable entrance scholarships valued at $12,000 each ($3,000/year).

Eligibility: Open to First Nations and indigenous Black residents of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Prince Edward Island who are entering Dalhousie direct from high school as well as those who have attended another post-secondary institution.  To be eligible, high school applicants will normally have an admission average of 80% or higher and students with previous post-secondary work a cumulative average of 3.0 (B) or higher.

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student's financial need and academic standing.  Applications are available on our web site:
http://www.registrar.dal.ca/forms/FNIBSES.pdf

Deadline: March 15

Information:
Awards Office
Dalhousie University
Halifax NS  B3H 4H6
Phone: 902-494-1432
Email: Awards@Dal.ca

 


Transition Year Program - Dalhousie University

The Transition Year Program (TYP) is a one-year program designed for First Nations students who wish to enter university but who may not yet meet standard entrance requirements. The TYP was established to redress the historic educational disadvantage experienced by members of Aboriginal communities.

Amount: Non-Status and Métis students accepted into the program may qualify to receive a tuition waiver and bursary funding to attend Dalhousie's Transition Year Program. If the qualifying year is completed in good standing, continued financial assistance will become available.

Eligibility: Non-Status or Métis. Status students attending the program are funded through the Confederacy of Mainland Micmac, the Department of Indian Affairs or by individual band councils. Although enrollment is limited to ensure that each student receives considerable personal attention, highly motivated First Nations students of all ages and educational backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Applicants who are 23 or older are especially encouraged to apply.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: March 15 each year.

Information: Transition Year Program
Dalhousie University
1459 LeMarchant Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5
Tel: (902) 494-3730


Morris Saffron Award - Dalhousie University

For a Status or Non-Status Aboriginal graduate of the Dalhousie University Transition Year Program.

Amount: One award of approximately $100

Eligibility: An Aboriginal graduate of the Transition Year Program who is recommended for acceptance in the first-year level at Dalhousie University or another university.

Duration: Annual.

Application Deadline: N/A.
Information: Director
Transition Year Program
Dalhousie University
1459 LeMarchant Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5
Phone: (902) 494-3730


Hydro-Quebec Programme de Prix D'Excellence pour les Etudiants Autochtones

Value: Four prizes of $1,000 for students engaged in CEGEP- level studies; two awards of $2,000 to students engaged in university-level studies.

This program rewards the educational efforts and success of Aboriginal students,and ref lects Hydro-Quebec's concern for them. Through this program, Hydro-Quebec hopes to persuade other young Aboriginals to continue post-secondary studies.

Eligibility: Applicants must: be of Aboriginal ancestry; live in Quebec; completed at least one year of full-time studies in a CEGEP (DEC)or university (bachelor 's degree) program; and be registered in a full-time program at a CEGEP or university in Quebec for the following fall.

Deadline: June - CEGEP awards; March - university awards

Information:

Mr. Dany Nepton
Relations avec les Autochtones
Hydro-Québec
75,boul.René Lévesque oues 18 étage
Montréal, Québec H2Z 1A4
Phone: (514)289-2211 ext.4290


James A. Martin Awards - St. Francis Xavier University

Value: Varies.

Eligibility: Applicants are students showing leadership, dedication and commitment by working for peace and he welfare of their neighbours. Preference is given to Firs Nation students at St.Francis Xavier. The award is tenable at St.Francis Xavier for full-time study for the academic year.

Deadline: April 15

Information:
Financial Aid Office
St.Francis Xavier University
P.O.Box 5000
Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5
Phone: (902)867-2374


Bank of Montreal Aboriginal Business Administration Student Scholarship - University College of Cape Breton

Value: One scholarship of $2,500.

Eligibility: To be eligible, the applicant must: be of Aboriginal ancestry; be a current University College of Cape Breton student; demonstrate academic merit in the area of accounting and finance with a minimum grade point average of 75%,with no failures; carry a full course load according to the requirements of the program; and demonstrate financial need.

Deadline: April 8

Information: University College of Cape Breton
P.O.Box 5300
Sydney, Nova Scotia B1P 6L2
Phone: (902) 539-5300


Dr. Carrie Best Scholarship - University of King's College

Value: 2 awards at $5,000 per year for 4 years.

Students who are seeking admission to an undergraduate programme in arts, science or journalism at the University of King's College are eligible for to be considered for this award. Applicants may request consideration by completing an application form, available on our web site:

Details and application forms available on-line at www.ukings.ca/kings_3975.html

Eligibility: Open to Aboriginal Canadians and African-Canadians only, the award is tenable for four years based on satisfactory academic performance. Final selection is based on interviews of leading candidates.

Information:
Office of the Registrar
University of King's College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2A1
Phone: (902) 422-1271 ext 108
E-mail: admissions@ukings.ns.ca
Web: www.ukings.ns.ca
Fax: (902) 562-0119


Various Journalism Awards - University of King's College

Deadline: February 15, 2008 for September 2008

Value: $6,000 each

Alumni Association Scholarship - Value: $6,000
ATV/CTV Media Scholarship - Value: $6,000
Rogers Broadcasting All-News Scholarship - Value: $5,000
Daily News Journalism Scholarship - Value: $1,000
Reader's Digest Journalism Scholarship - Value: $2,000

Details and application forms available on-line at www.ukings.ca/kings_3975.html

Available to students who are applying for admission to our one year Bachelor of Journalism programme.

Information:
Office of the Registrar
University of King's College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2A1
Phone: (902) 422-1271 ext 108
E-mail: admissions@ukings.ns.ca
Web: www.ukings.ns.ca
Fax: (902) 562-0119

 

FAAY Scholarships

Foundation for the Advancement of Aboriginal Youth (FAAY) - Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

NEWS:  FAAY Awards now being administered by Indspire.

New deadline date: June 1, 2015

Number of Awards: The number of awards is dependent on the sponsors of the program. In 2008 we disbursed 140 awards, 95 were scholarships and 45 were bursaries.
Award Amount: Scholarships for post-secondary applicants range from $2,500 - $5,000. Bursaries for high school applicants are $750.

Eligibility Factors: Canadian residents of First Nations (Status or Non-status), Métis and Inuit Heritage attending High School or a Post-secondary Institution full-time within Canada. Mature students and adult education programs are included.
Supporting Documents Required:
1. Letter of introduction: introduce your-self, mention education goal and career plan, any challenges, any successes, contributions to family, school, community, and answer why you think staying in school is important.
2. Proof of Heritage includes: copy of Indian Status Card; copy of Métis membership card; copy of Inuit beneficiary card; parent/grandparent heritage information & documents showing your relationship to them (long-form birth certificate, baptismal records.); letter of acknowledgement from First Nation, Métis Association or Inuit Agreement Administrator.
3. Original, signed letter from a school/academic representative: teacher, instructor, guidance counsellor, principal, faculty member, teaching assistant, sessional lecturer, practicum supervisor
4. Original, signed letter from someone, not related to you, who can speak to your commitment to your community: volunteer organization, aboriginal group, sports rep, camp leader, work supervisor..
5. Copy of most recent official Transcript or Report Card.
6. Copy of acceptance letter to program or proof of continued enrolment.
7. Recent photo in either digital or hard copy format.
8. Completed application form, signed and dated.

Deadline: Application must be postmarked on or before June 1 of each year.

For more information contact:

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554
 

 

www.indspire.ca

Indspire Scholarships

National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (NAAF) is now Indspire.

Deadlines:

Fine Arts:
Two deadlines anually on May 1

OFIFC Bursary:
For Mature Aboriginal Women with Dependant Child(ren) Residing in an Urban Setting in Ontario
May 1

Legal Studies for Aboriginal People (LSAP) PRE-LAW Bursary Award:
May 15

Oil and Gas Aboriginal Trades & Technology
Two deadlines anually on April 30 and November 30

Aboriginal Health Careers:
One deadline annually on June 1

Post-Secondary Education Awards:

One deadline annually on June 1

For more information contact:

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca


Imperial Oil Aboriginal Scholarship Awards Program (Inspire)

Imperial Oil has formed a partnership with Indspire to manage its Aboriginal Scholarship Awards Program (ASAP).

The purpose of the awards program is to encourage and assist people  of Aboriginal ancestry to pursue post-secondary educational studies  in disciplines relevant to the petroleum industry.

Please apply on-line at Indspire's post-secondary education bursary awards program or contact Indspire at 1-800-329-9780.

 


Aboriginal Health Careers Program Scholarship:

Deadline: May 1

Provides support for students who are pursuing accredited health studies leading to employment in the health professions and who have demonstrated the potential for academic success.

Eligible fields of study: medicine, nursing, dentistry, biology, chemistry, physiotherapy, pharmacy, clinical psychology, laboratory reasearch and technology and any other health field in which a study of the hard sciences is a pre-requisite.

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554


Aboriginal Veterans' Scholarship Trust - Canada

For students engaged in fields of study that support and contribute to Aboriginal self-governance and economic self-reliance. For more information check out the web site Aboriginal Veterans Scholarship Trust.

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca


Business, Sciences and General Education Program

Value: Varies from $1,000 to $8,000

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry (Status, Non-Status, Métis, Inuit) attending a Canadian Community College (CEGEP) or university
(first year or returning students); registered in programs such as busieness, health sciences, new and advanced technologies (not limited to these). Priority is given to students enrolled in business and sciences.
Deadline: June 1

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca


Diane Fowler Leblanc Aboriginal Social Work Scholarship - Indspire

Value: The amount of each scholarship is based on the individual needs of each candidate (tuition, course materials, living expenses, daycare, travel) up to a maximum of $10,000 per year for three or four years, depending on the institution 's course requirements.

Eligibility: The scholarship is open to all Aboriginal people, including Métis, Inuit, and Status and Non-Status Indians, interested in studying at the Bachelor of Social Work level at a recognized educational institution in Canada.
Deadline: Unknown

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca


The Alberta Museology Internship

Value: Varies.
Two four month internships at the Provincial Museum of Alberta for Aboriginal students pursuing a career in ethnology, natural history or Canadian history.

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca


Arts Scholarship Program
Deadline: March 31.

Value: Based on Budget needs. All areas related to the visual, performing, media, graphic and literary arts. Award decision based on merit of project, quality of raining and financial need. Art work samples will need to be sent with application.

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca


Petro Canada Education Awards for Native Students:
Deadline June 15

Five education awards of up to $5,000 are available to native students of Canadian or Inuit ancestry entering or enrolled in post-secondary programs where studies can be applied in an industrial setting in the oil and gas industry. Selection is based on financial need, academic performance and potential, appropriateness of studies to industry, and future aspirations.

Contact individual schools for application forms.

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554
www.indspire.ca


Shell Canada Aboriginal Scholarship Program (Indspire)
Preference will be given to studies in business, science and engineering.

CIBC Achievers (Indspire)
Fields of study an unlimited.

TransCanada Pipelines Leadership Awards (Indspire)
With these awards, TransCanada Pipelines is helping Aboriginal students prepare themselves to play leading roles in the fields of engineering, business and commerce, law, science and technology, environment and communications.

BP Canada Aboriginal Young Achievers Scholarship (Indspire)
Priority for these scholarships may be given to students who are pursuing careers in business, engineering, environmental studies and physical sciences.

Great-West Life Business Education Scholarship (Indspire)
This scholarship was created to help Aboriginal students from across Canada to succeed in the areas of business and entrepreneurship.

TD Bank Financial Group Scholarships (Indspire)
Through its support of the scholarship program, TD Bank Financial Group is helping to make it easier for Aboriginal students to realize their educational goals.

UGG Agricultural Scholarships (Indspire)
UGG is pleased to provide scholarships to encourage Aboriginal students from the Prairie Provinces to pursue careers in fields related to agriculture.

The CN Aboriginal Scholarships (Indspire)
These scholarships provide funding assistance to Aboriginal students from across Canada who are engaged in studies that will prepare them for careers in the transportation industry such as engineering, business, computer science, communications and technical studies.

Suncor Energy Foundation "Shared Achievements" Aboriginal Scholarships (Indspire)
These scholarships were created to assist Aboriginal students who are pursuing post-secondary education in business, teaching and science, particularly engineering, earth sciences, natural resource management, environmental studies and computer science. Preference will be given to students from Central and Northern Alberta, Northeastern and Southwestern British Columbia and the North West Territories.

3M Canada Aboriginal Health Education Awards (Indspire)
With these awards, 3M Canada is making a positive contribution to the lives of Aboriginal students who are pursuing careers in fields related to health care.

Sun Life Financial Careers in Health Awards (Indspire)
With these awards, Sun Life Financial is providing increased opportunities for Aboriginal students to receive training and education for careers in health care.

Weyerhaeuser Aboriginal Scholarship (Indspire)
Weyerhaeuser is pleased to offer scholarship assistance to Aboriginal students who are pursuing careers in business and science.
Contact individual schools for application forms.

Indspire
Head Office
P.O. Box 759
2160 Fourth Line Rd.
Six Nations of the Grand River
Ohsweken, ON, N0A 1M0
Toll free: 1-800-329-9780
Phone: (416) 926-0775
Fax: (416) 926-7554

www.indspire.ca

Manitoba Scholarships

Manitoba Scholarships and Bursaries:


Manitoba Hydro's Awards Bursaries and Scholarships

Post-Secondary Funding

Employment Equity Bursary                                               

Amount:  11 bursaries of $1,500 each

Application deadline:  October 1st

Eligibility Criteria: 

  • Member of an Employment Equity designated group*
  • Entering first year of a 4 year degree program at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg or Brandon in the following:  Engineering, Computer Science or Business

OR

Entering first year of studies at Red River College, Assiniboine Community College or University College of the North in the following:  Computer Analyst/Programming, Information Systems, Business Information Systems, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Electronic, Instrumentation, Mechanical, Communications or Power Engineering Technologies

*Employment Equity Designated Group members include women, Aboriginal peoples, members of visible minority groups, and persons with disabilities.

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers

First Year Information Technology Bursary                        Amount:  2 bursaries valued at $1,500 each

Application Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Entering 1st year of studies at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg or Brandon studying: Computer Sciences, Computer Engineering, or University One Computer Science/Engineering curriculum

            OR:

  • Entering 1st year of studies at Red River College or University College of the North studying: Computer Analyst/ Programming or Computer Systems Technology

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


2nd Year to Final Year Information Technology Bursary            Amount: 2 bursaries valued at $2,500 each

Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Entering 2nd year of studies at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg or Brandon studying: Computer Sciences or Computer Engineering

            OR:

  • Students in 2nd second to final years of studies at Red River College or University College of the North  studying: Computer Analyst/ Programming or Computer Systems Technology

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


2nd Year to Final Year Engineering Technology Bursary                       

Amount:  6 bursaries of $1,500 each

Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Students in their second to final years of studies at Red River College, University College of the North or Assiniboine Community College studying: Civil, Electronic, Electrical, Computer, Instrumentation, Mechanical, Communications, or Power Engineering Technologies.

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers.


First Year Engineering Bursary                                   

Amount:  6 bursaries of $1,500 each

Application Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Accepted into first-year of studies at the University of Manitoba in Engineering (Electrical, Civil or Mechanical), or a member of the Engineering Access Program (ENGAP) or University One Engineering curriculum.

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


2nd Year to Final Year Engineering Bursary                       

Amount:  3 bursaries of $2,500 each

Application Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Students in their second to final year of studies at the University of Manitoba in Engineering (Electrical, Civil or Mechanical) and/or a member of the Engineering Access Program (ENGAP);

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


First Year Management Bursary                                    Amount:  3 bursaries of $1,500 each

Application Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Students accepted into their first year of studies at a Manitoba University enrolled in:

 

- Commerce at the Asper School of Business majoring in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources, or Marketing; or

- A member of Aboriginal Business Education Partners (ABEP) at the University of Manitoba; or

- A 4 year Business Administration degree program majoring in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources or Marketing.

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


2nd Year to Final Year Management Bursary

 Amount:  3 bursaries of $2,500 each

Application Deadline: October 1st

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Students in their second year to final year of studies at a Manitoba university enrolled in:

- Commerce at the Asper School of Business majoring in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources or Marketing; or

- A 4-year Business Administration degree program majoring in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources or Marketing; or

- A member of Aboriginal Business Education Partners (ABEP) at the University of Manitoba.

Selection criteria will include academic performance, financial need, and community involvement.

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


Anishinabe Oway-Ishi Manitoba Aboriginal Youth Achievement Awards: The Frank Wesley Awards

Amount:  2 awards of $1,000 each

Application Deadline:  September 15th                                    

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Open to all Aboriginal peoples ages 16-24
  • Academic performance

Application Process:  Anishinabe Oway-Ishi accepts nominations and selects students to receive awards.  For more information and nomination forms (posted each September), visit the Manitoba Aboriginal Youth Achievement Awards website at www.mayaa.ca


University College of the North – Moving Forward Together Scholarships

Application Deadline:  April 30th                                               

Manitoba Hydro has committed $80,000 to University College of the North through the Moving Forward Together Campaign.  The funding is available in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 at a value of $20,000 each year.  There are 2 types of scholarships available for Aboriginal students attending UCN

Eligibility Criteria: 

The first set of scholarships is valued at $2,000 each and will be awarded to 8 Aboriginal students enrolled in one of the following programs:

  • Computer Analyst/Programming
  • Computer Systems Technology
  • Electrical/Electronic Technology

The second set of scholarships is valued at $500 each and will be awarded to 8 Aboriginal students enrolled in one of the following programs:

  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Bachelor of Nursing
  • Business Administration Diploma
  • Carpentry/Woodworking Certificate
  • Civil/CAD Technology Certificate
  • Early Childhood Education Diploma
  • Facilities Technician Diploma
  • General Studies:  Adult Education Diploma
  • Heavy Duty Mechanics Certificate
  • Industrial Welding Certificate
  • Kenanow Bachelor of Education – Integrated Stream (BEDIS)
  • Kenanow Bachelor of Education – After Degree Stream (BEADS)
  • Natural Resource Management Technology Diploma
  • Office Administration Diploma
  • Preparation for Technology Certificate

Application Process:  The University College of the North will select the students and will be awarding the scholarships in September.  For more information and application forms, visit the University College of the North website at www.ucn.ca/ics/Campus_Life/Info_for_Students.jnz



Certificate Program Award                                               

Amount:  2 awards of $500 each

Application Deadline: July 15th

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal student
  • Students enrolled in one of the following certificate programs: Administrative Assistant, Human Resources Assistant, Contact Centre Representative, Business & Administrative Studies, Computer Applications for Business, Network Support, or Electrical Certificate Programs at a recognized Educational Institution in Manitoba.
  • Academic performance

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers

High School Awards

Mathematics Award                                                            Amount:  1 award of $200 

Deadline: May 15th

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal ancestry
  • Grade 9 students
  • Highest provincial achievement in the Pascal Math competition

Application Process:  Math teachers or competition coordinators will forward the name of their most successful student who is willing to self-declare as being of Aboriginal Ancestry.

Pick-up a nomination/application from your guidance counselor or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers

For more information about the Pascal Math competition, visit their website at www.cemc.uwaterloo.ca

Science Fair Award                                                            Amount:  1 award of $200

Deadline: May 15th

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal ancestry
  • Students in Junior High or High School
  • High achievement in a Science Fair competition

Application Process:  Science teachers or coordinators will nominate Aboriginal Science Fair participants. Science Fair judges will provide feedback on the nomination/application form on students' submissions for consideration in selecting award recipient. Pick-up a nomination/application from your guidance counselor or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers

Trio Award
Application Deadline: July 15th

Amount:

  • 1 award of $200 (Grade 10 – 20S Applied or Pre-Cal Math & English, 20F Science)
  • 1 award of $300 (Grade 11 – 30S Applied or Pre-Cal Math, English and Physics)
  • 1 award of $500 (Grade 12 – 40S Applied or Pre-Cal Math, English and Physics)

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal ancestry
  • High school student in Grade 10 - 12

Application Process: Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


Northern Student Award                                                Amount:  3 awards of $300 each

Deadline: July 15th

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal ancestry
  • Junior High or High School Student living north of the 53rd parallel
  • Nominated by a teacher as an outstanding student based on academic performance, personal achievements and/or other accomplishments

Application Process:  Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


Physics Award                                                                        Amount:  1 award of $200

Deadline: July 15th

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Aboriginal ancestry
  • Students in Grade 11 or 12
  • High achievement in a Science Fair competition

Application Process:  Science teachers or coordinators will nominate Aboriginal Science Fair participants. Science Fair judges will provide feedback on the nomination/application form on students' submissions for consideration in selecting award recipient. Pick-up a nomination/application from your guidance counselor or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca/careers


The Manitoba Aboriginal Sport & Recreation Council Scholarships

Application deadline: June 17.


MASRC Aboriginal Athlete Scholarship

The Manitoba Aboriginal Sport & Recreation Council will annually present $500 scholarships to sixteen Aboriginal students who have demonstrated a commitment to sport in Manitoba. Our goal is to encourage students to continue being active while attending a recognized post secondary institute. All Grade 12 students who will be graduating in 2011 and who are enrolled in a recognized Post Secondary Institute for the 2011/2012 academic season are encouraged to apply.

Eligibility:
The MASRC will award Athlete Scholarships to Aboriginal students graduating from Grade 12 and who are enrolled into a full time University or other recognized Post Secondary Institution.

All candidates must complete the application form in full and provide all required information, documents, and letters in order for their applications to be considered.

A candidate must have proficiency in sport, and have a minimum "C" (65%) average in his/her grades.

Scholarships will be awarded to those Aboriginal Youth who have shown athletic leadership in Manitoba's amateur sport community through well rounded participation as an athlete, as well as on the basis of academic standing, and other school/community related activities.

MASRC Aboriginal Coach Scholarship

The Manitoba Aboriginal Sport & Recreation Council annually presents $500 scholarships to two Aboriginal students who have demonstrated a commitment to coaching in Manitoba. Our goal is to encourage students to continue coaching while attending a recognized post secondary institute. All students who are currently enrolled into a post secondary institute and currently coaching for a school, club, or community centre are invited to submit an application.

Scholarships will be awarded to those Aboriginal Youth who have shown coaching leadership in the Manitoba's amateur sport community through well rounded participation as a coach, as well as on the basis of academic standing, and other school/community related activities.

Eligibility:
The MASRC will award Coaching Scholarships to Aboriginal Youth (up to 29 years of age) who are enrolling into a full time University or other recognized Post Secondary Institution.

Current full time Post Secondary students, as defined by the Post Secondary Institute.

A candidate must have proficiency in sport, and have a minimum "C" (65%) average in his/her grades.

Currently coaching individuals/teams in Manitoba and plan on continuing their coaching duties.

National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP) training is an asset.

Additional courses related to coaching (i.e. NCCP, CPR, First Aid, Coaching Seminars) are an asset.

Manitoba Aboriginal Sport & Recreation Council145 Pacific Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 2Z6

Phone: (204) 925-5622
Fax: (204) 925-5716

Email: masrc@sportmanitoba.ca

www.masrc.com


Business Council of Manitoba Aboriginal Education Awards

Deadline: March 15

Value: Each award is up to a maximum of $3,000 for university students or $1,500 for college students.

The Business Council Awards are available to anyone of Aboriginal ancestry who is pursuing post-secondary education in Manitoba. You must maintain a full course load (60%), need financial assistance and be interested in working with one of the Business Council's member companies. The awards are to assist with the cost of tuition, books and supplies.

For more information please contact the financial awards office at any of Manitoba's public post-secondary institutions.


Louis Riel Institute - Bursary & Scholarships - Manitoba

Deadline: Due dates vary, check with university directly

All Métis students planning to attend one of the four (4) provincial universities in Manitoba are eligible to apply for an award.

Bursaries are awarded primarily on the basis of economic need.
Scholarships are awarded primarily on the basis of academic merit.

The value & number of each award varies at each university and is best obtained directly from the University.

Application:
Louis Riel Institute
103-150 Henry Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba


MTS Pursue Your Calling Scholarship Program

The future success of MTS relies on students such as yourself.
The skills and expertise acquired through post-secondary education is a vital factor for the continued growth of MTS. Recognizing this, MTS has established the Pursue Your Calling scholarship program.

Pursue Your Calling is a scholarship program designed to encourage students to study in areas of high demand for the telecommunications industry. Scholarships will be awarded to grade 12 graduates entering their first year of full-time study in one of the eligible programs.

Benefits of the Scholarship

Receive $1,000 to be applied towards your tuition for each year of your program, to a maximum of four years totaling $4,000.

Be eligible for summer employment at MTS, which is an excellent opportunity to gain hands-on work experience in your chosen field of study.

Be eligible for employee discounts on cellular phones and service and DSL High Speed Internet service.

Be provided with a mentor who will support and help you adapt to the MTS corporate environment.

Participate in scheduled MTS related activities with mentors and other students.

Pursue Your Calling scholarships are awarded based on your academic achievement
(75% or over), and your responses to the short answer questions provided.

Short listed candidates are required to participate in an interview with the MTS scholarship selection committee before final decisions are made.

MTS is an Employment Equity employer and values a diverse workforce. Consideration will be given to all eligible applicants: men, women, visible minorities, aboriginal people, and people with disabilities.

Application forms are available online or from your school guidance counsellor.

Please be sure to include with your application:
1. Transcript of your marks.
2. Proof of acceptance into eligible post-secondary program of study.
3. Resume.
4. Responses to all four (4) short answer questions.

Application Forms:

Pursue Your Calling - Printable Application Form (PDF)

Contact the MTS Community Relations Department.
Phone, write or e-mail us at:

Pursue Your Calling Scholarship Program
c/o MTS Community Relations Department
P.O. Box 6666, (MP18C)
333 Main Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 3V6
Phone: (204) 941-8341
E-mail: community.relations@mts.ca


Abraham McPherson Memorial Scholarship Award

Award provided by Manitoba Aboriginal Education Counselling Association Inc. to Aboriginal students pursuing post-secondary education in the counselling field.

Value: Four scholarships annually $250 each

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry ( Status, Non-Status, Inuit, Métis); Manitoba resident, high school graduate with overall 70% average in graduating.

Procedure: Applicants are available from the Student Services Centre Awards Office, from any Tribal Council, , Band Education Authority in Manitoba.

Deadline: May 31

Manitoba Aboriginal Education Counselling Association Inc.
305- 352 Donald Stret.
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3B 2H8

Phone: (204) 947-0421


Trio Award
Deadline: December 1

Value:
* 1 award of $200 awarded to a student in Senior 2
* 1 award of $300 awarded to a student in Senior 3
* 1 award of $500 awarded to a student in Senior 4

Potential opportunity for summer employment or full-time employment in one of Manitoba Hydro's Trades Training Programs*

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* High school student in Senior 2 to Senior 4
* Academic performance or demonstrated improvement in:

Mathematics (pre-calculus or applied) 20S, 30S, and 40S
Science 20F
Physics 30S and 40S
English 20F, 30S, and 40S

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


Northern Student Award

Deadline: December 1

Value: 3 awards of $300 awarded to Junior High or High school students living north of the 53rd parallel

* Potential opportunity for summer employment or full-time employment in one of Manitoba Hydro's Trades Training Programs*

Eligibility Criteria
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Living north of the 53rd parallel
* Nominated by a teacher as an outstanding student based on academic performance, personal achievements and/or other accomplishments

* Manitoba Hydro provides a range of technical and trades related training programs which include indentured apprenticeships, non-indentured apprenticeships, and post-journeyman development.

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.



Mathematics Award

Deadline: May 15
Value: 1 award of $200 granted to a student in Senior 1

Eligibility Criteria
v Aboriginal ancestry
v Highest provincial achievement in the Pascal Math competition

Application Process:
Math teachers or competition coordinators will forward the name of their most successful student who is willing to self-declare as being of Aboriginal Ancestry.

Pick-up a nomination/application from your guidance counselor or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.

For more information about the Pascal Math competition, visit their website at www.cemc.uwaterloo.ca


Science Fair Award

Deadline: May 15
Value: 1 award of $200 granted to a student in Junior High or High school

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* High achievement in a Science Fair competition

Application Process:
Science teachers or coordinators will nominate Aboriginal Science Fair participants. Science Fair judges will provide feedback on the nomination/application form on students' submissions for consideration in selecting award recipient. Pick-up a nomination/application from your guidance counselor or visit our website at  www.hydro.mb.ca.


First Year Information Technology Bursary

Deadline: October 1

Value: 2 bursaries of $1500 awarded plus potential opportunity for summer employment
Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Accepted into the University of Manitoba, University of Winnipeg or Brandon University studying: Computer Sciences or University One Computer Science curriculum

OR: Accepted into Red River College or Keewatin Community College studying: Computer Analyst/ Programmer or Computer Systems Technology
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


Second Year to Final Year Information Technology Bursary

Deadline: October 1
Value: 2 bursaries of $2500 awarded
* Potential opportunity for summer employment available to recipients returning to full time studies in the fall.
* Potential opportunity for full-time employment in the Information Technology Training Program for students in their final year.

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Students in second year to final year at the University of Manitoba, University of Winnipeg or Brandon University studying: Computer Sciences

OR: Students in second year to final year at Red River College or Keewatin Community College studying: Computer Analyst/ Programmer or Computer Systems Technology
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


Second Year to Final Year Engineering Technology Bursary

Deadline: October 1
Value: 6 bursaries of $1500 awarded
* Potential opportunity for summer employment available to recipients returning to full time studies in the fall
* Potential opportunity for full-time employment in a Manitoba Hydro in-house Trades Training Program for students in their final year*

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Students in second year to final year at Red River College, Keewatin Community College or Assiniboine Community College studying: Electronic, Electrical, Computer, or Communications Engineering Technologies.
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


Certificate Program Award

Deadline: December 1 for July to December programs and July 2 for January to July programs.

Value: 2 awards of $500 awarded plus potential opportunity for term or full time employment.

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Enrolled in one of the following programs: Administrative Assistant, Human Resources Assistant, Network Support, or Contact Centre Representative at a recognized Educational Institution in Manitoba.
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.

Submit completed application to:

Community Relations Advisor,
Employment Equity Department,
Manitoba Hydro,
P.O. Box 815,
Winnipeg, MB, R3C 2P4

 


First Year Engineering Bursary

Deadline: October 1

Value: 6 bursaries of $1,500 awarded plus potential opportunity for summer employment

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Accepted into first-year Engineering, ENGAP, or taking engineering curriculum in University One at the University of Manitoba
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


Second Year to Final Year Engineering Bursary

Deadline: October 1

Value: 3 bursaries of $2,500 awarded
* Potential opportunity for summer employment available to recipients returning to full time studies in the fall.
* Potential opportunity for full-time employment in the Engineer-In-Training Program for students in their final year.

Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal Ancestry
* Engineering or ENGAP students at the University of Manitoba in second year to final year, studying (in order of preference): electrical, civil & mechanical, other engineering disciplines.
* Academic Performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


First Year Management Bursary

Deadline: October 1

Value: 3 bursaries of $1500 awarded
* Potential opportunity for summer employment
Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Accepted into first-year Management or ABEP at the University of Manitoba
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.


Second Year to Final Year Management Bursary

Deadline: October 1

Value: 3 bursaries of $2500 awarded
* Potential opportunity for summer employment available to recipients returning to full time studies in the fall.
* Potential opportunity for full-time employment in the Commerce Career Development Program for students in their final year.
Eligibility Criteria:
* Aboriginal ancestry
* Management or ABEP students at the University of Manitoba in second year to final year, majoring in Human Resources, Finance, Accounting, or Marketing.
* Academic performance

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.

Note: Further considerations for bursaries can include:
* home community, with preference given to Aboriginal Peoples whose home community is North of the 53rd parallel
* financial need

 

Application Process:
Pick up an application from your educational institution's awards office or visit our website at www.hydro.mb.ca.

National Scholarships


The Indigenous Learning Centre (ILC) 2016 Bursary Program
 
The ILC has 3 @ $1,000 bursaries to be awarded in August 2016. Bursaries are available to Aboriginal students attending college or university as a full-time student in an academic program such as; Business Administration, Business Management, Accounting, Commerce and/or other finance related programs.
 
CLICK HERE for the Bursary Guidelines and Application or see attached Application.
 
Deadline for Applications: Friday, August 5, 2016
 
Application packages can be emailed to pr@afoa.ca or faxed to 613-722-3467, mailed, couriered or submitted in person at the address below:
 
Indigenous Learning Centre
c/o AFOA Canada
1066 Somerset Street West-Suite 301,
Ottawa, ON K1Y 4T3

 

 

 


CFUW Aboriginal Women’s Award (AWA).

 

The application deadline is November 1, 2016.

In March 2015, the Education Council-Wolfville transferred the proceeds of their education fund to the CFUW Charitable Trust to establish a new award, the CFUW Aboriginal Women’s Award (AWA).

This award was designed to honour Dr. Marion Elder Grant’s life-long commitment to education of women.  Dr. Grant has an outstanding record of leadership as the 11th National President, CFUW Wolfville President and educator. 

Funds were provided by members of CFUW Wolfville and the Estate of Dr. Marion Elder Grant.  The value of this award is established by a formula which adjusts for the variation in the cost of tuition for different programs across Canada.  For the 2016-2017 academic year, the award will be within the value range of $10,000 - $25,000.  The formula also allows for future awards to be adjusted based on higher tuition expenses. 

An applicant for the CFUW AWA will be considered eligible on the basis of the following criteria:

  • Canadian Aboriginal woman;
  • Study in Canada;
  • Holds or will hold an undergraduate university degree or equivalent before the CFUW AWA for which she applied is granted; and
  • Must have applied to be a full-time student in any year of an eligible program* at a recognized or accredited Canadian post-secondary degree-granting institution.

*Eligible programs: are the academic programs for which a CFUW AWA Applicant (or Renewal Applicant) may be studying. They include:

1. Programs leading to a first degree in law – Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.); Juris Doctor (J.D.).

2. Programs leading to the following first degrees in medicine – Medical Doctor (M.D.); Doctor of Optometry (O.D.).

3. Programs leading to qualifying for a license to practice as a Nurse Practitioner in the province or territory of the graduate’s choice.

4. Programs leading to a Master’s degree in fields dealing with important Canadian aboriginal issues at the time the AWA is given as defined by the most recent Canadian report by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples.

The award is renewable as it is designed to help a Renewal Applicant by providing the award for a second year. 

In May 2016, the CFUW AWA application form with instructions, guidelines, and eligibility criteria will be available from the CFUW website:  www.cfuw.org.

 


Skills Award for Aboriginal Youth - Canadian Council of Forest Ministers and the Forest Products Association of Canada

 

Deadline: October 16th

This year $2500 will be awarded to two individuals who meet the eligibility criteria below more information on the application requirements is provided on the website and in the attached booklet.
 
Eligibility Criteria
1. Demonstrate strong academic standing; and
2. Are currently enrolled in a post-secondary study program; and
3. Demonstrate a commitment to their field of study beyond academics, such as volunteering or working for the forest products industry; and
4. Demonstrate a commitment to the Aboriginal community; and
5. Are Canadian; and
6. Are First Nations, Inuit, or Métis; and
7. Are between the ages of 18-30 (proof of age required); and
8. Have not won this award in the last 3 years.

Website: www.fpac.ca/forestry-jobs/aboriginal/skills-award/

 


AltaLink Aboriginal Scholarship Program

 

This scholarship program is designed to recognize leaders in the Aboriginal community by offering eight scholarships to Aboriginal students attending post-secondary institutions. Two eligible students from each of Treaty 6, 7, 8 and the Métis community in Alberta will be awarded with a $1,000 scholarship. 

ELIGIBILITY:
To be eligible, applicants must be currently enrolled in a post-secondary institution and:

  • Treaty applicants must be born in Alberta. 
  • Métis applicants must either be a member of the Métis Nation of Alberta Association or an Alberta Métis Settlement or must have been living in Alberta for at least the past three months with a Métis membership card from another province. 

HOW TO ENTER:
Application forms are available online at http://www.altalink.ca/responsibility/communityinvestment/powerful-education.cfm and may be submitted by email or by mail to the address below. A transcript, either official or unofficial, and a photocopy of your status card must be submitted for the application to be considered. The deadline for receipt of the completed application is October 15.

Email: aboriginalrelations@altalink.ca,

or mail to

AltaLink
ATTN: Altalink Aboriginal Scholarship
2611 - 3rd Avenue SE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 7W7

 


2016 Jim Pattison Broadcast Group Prairie Equity Scholarship

Purpose
By supporting the career development of groups currently underrepresented in the broadcast industry on the Canadian Prairies, the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group believes it can improve the industry in a number of ways.
• By removing barriers to employment for underrepresented groups
• Aboriginal Peoples
• Persons with disabilities
• Members of visible minorities
• Women

• By accessing a currently untapped pool of potentially talented employees
• By encouraging the employment of people with diverse viewpoints and backgrounds
• By using those diverse backgrounds and viewpoints
• to enhance relationships with local communities
• to broaden the potential audience and advertiser base

The Scholarship
The Prairie stations of the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group will make available two $2000.00 scholarships in 2016 to students accepted into a recognized broadcast education program at a post-secondary educational institution in Alberta, Saskatchewan or Manitoba.

Eligibility Criteria
Applicants must meet these criteria:
• Resident of Alberta, Saskatchewan, or Manitoba.
• Attending or planning to attend, on a full-time basis, a post-secondary institution in Alberta, Saskatchewan or Manitoba in a recognized Broadcast program. (Though applicants may apply prior to enrollment, proof of enrollment will be required before payment is finalized.)
• Signature of head of institution’s Broadcast Department or of high school Counselor or Principal certifying that the applicant meets the eligibility requirements.

Selection Criteria
The selection committee will award the scholarships based on the following criteria.
• Preference will be given to members of groups currently underrepresented in the broadcast industry.
• Aboriginal Peoples
• Persons with disabilities
• Members of visible minorities
• Women

• The submission of a short essay. This essay will be evaluated on the clarity and content of how the applicant addresses the following:
• Applicability of the philosophy of this scholarship to the applicant’s personal situation (i.e., membership in one of the underrepresented groups).
• The applicant’s commitment to broadcasting
• The applicant’s community involvement and activity

Two personal references.
Application Procedure

Complete the application form, attaching your essay and recommendation letters, and mail or e-mail all documents to:
Prairie Equity Scholarship Committee
Jim Pattison Broadcast Group – Medicine Hat Division
10 Boundary Road SE
Redcliff, Alberta
T0J 2P0
dsherwood@jpbg.ca

Applications must be postmarked/e-mailed by October 8, 2016.
The applications will be reviewed by the General Managers of the stations of the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. A personal or phone interview may be arranged. The successful applicants will be notified by November 2016.

 

 


ConocoPhillips Aboriginal Awards Program
Deadline June 30th of each year.
 
The Aboriginal Awards Program has been developed to provide financial assistance to Aboriginal students pursuing high school upgrading and post-secondary education.
 
Award amounts are designated according to the educational level you are pursuing:

Secondary School/Academic Upgrading $1,000
College or Technical Institute $2,000
University $3,000
 
The award amounts are granted on an annual basis with students being required to re-apply each year for continued funding. Awards may be used to cover portions of tuition, books or living expenses.
 
Eligibility
You may apply to the ConocoPhillips Aboriginal Awards Program if you meet the following criteria:
1. You are of Aboriginal ancestry
2. You are a Canadian citizen
3. You are enrolled in an eligible program, on a full-time basis
4. You demonstrate promising academic qualifications
5. You require financial assistance to pursue your education
Application process: Please send your completed application along with your proof of acceptance and most recent transcripts to the following address:
 
Please send your completed application along with your proof of acceptance and most recent transcripts to the following address no later than June 30th:
 
Attention: Aboriginal Awards Program
Stakeholder Engagement
ConocoPhillips Canada
P.O. Box 130, Station "M",
401 - 9th Avenue SW

Calgary, AB T2P 2H7

Direct Phone: (403) 260-1655

Fax: (403) 532-3404

Email: aboriginalawards@conocophillips.com

Link for Application Form: http://awards.conocophillips.ca


Canadian Nurses Foundation

Canadian Nurses Foundation (CNF) is the only national foundation solely committed to promoting the health and patient care of Canadians by financially supporting Canadian nurses engaged in higher education, research, home health-care and specialty certification; advocating dissemination and utilization of nursing knowledge.

Awards are supported by contributions from corporate and individual donors. CNF gives nurses across Canada approximately $275,000 annually in scholarships and certification awards.  The value of the scholarship awards ranges from $1,000-$6,000

The CNF TD Aboriginal Nursing Fund specifically supports First Nation Status or Non-status, Inuit or Métis nurses at the Bachelor, Master’s, PhD and Nurse Practitioner levels.  Over the past five years, CNF has supported over 100 aboriginal nursing scholars through the TD awards.

Deadline for all applications is March 31st of each year for the following academic year. 

Applicants for the CNA Certification awards must have confirmation of approval from CNA to write the exam. 

For more information, please visit the CNF web site at www.cnf-fiic.ca or e-mail to info@cnf-fiic.ca  We’re on Facebook and Twitter, too!

Tous les renseignements sont également disponibles en français.


9th Annual AFOA-PotashCorp Aboriginal Youth Financial Management Awards

The 9th Annual AFOA-PotashCorp Aboriginal Youth Financial Management Awards are open to Aboriginal youth in grades 11 and 12. Winners attend AFOA Canada's National Conference and participate in a special Youth program designed to introduce youth to careers in Aboriginal finance and management.

There is a great demand both within First Nation communities and off-reserve for Aboriginal financial management professionals and there are many opportunities for those who want to pursue this career path and many sources of assistance. However, very few of our young people are pursuing an education in financial management after high school. 

That is why AFOA Canada and PotashCorp have come together to offer the Aboriginal Youth Financial Management Awards. 

In 2015 we want to bring 3 outstanding Aboriginal Youth to Winnipeg, Manitoba for 4 nights to attend the conference and awards ceremony at the AFOA Canada National Conference on February 17-19, 2015.

Eligibility:

  • Aboriginal Ancestry
    (Proof of First Nation, Inuit or Métis status)
  • Pursuing post-secondary education and demonstrates an interest and is considering a career in the areas of finance and/or management/commerce (including financial management/planning, business administration, commerce, accounting and economics)
  • Completed Application Form and submit an essay
  • 2 letters of recommendation from a teacher, guidance counsellor or educator, attesting to the student’s performance and commitment
  • Academically successful
  • Students in Grades 11 and/or 12 may apply
    (maximum age 19)  

Deadline: Monday, December 1, 2014 at 9PM (EST)

For more information:

Call: 1-866-722-2362

Email: youthawards@afoa.ca

Website: www.afoa.ca

Submit your application, essay and reference letters to one of the following:

  1. Email: youthawards@afoa.ca
  2. Fax: (613)-722-3467
  3. Mail: AFOA Canada
    1066 Somerset St. West-Suite 301
    Ottawa, ON K1Y 4T3

 


ATCO Pipelines Aboriginal Education Awards Program

The ATCO Pipelines Aboriginal Educational Awards Program is aimed at supporting Aboriginal students from First Nations and Métis communities in close proximity to our facilities. Successful applicants will demonstrate a balanced lifestyle and commitment in the pursuit of education. These awards, bursaries and scholarships are awarded to select students who demonstrate leadership capabilities and strive to be role models in their schools and communities.

Since the program was launched in 2011, this program has seen 74 students from across the province receive awards.

There are three different awards available:

  • Merit Awards - merit awards of $500 to be granted each year;
    Must be attending High School (completing grades 10-12); Maximum one award per applicant per calendar year; Must re-apply to be considered for subsequent years 

  • Bursaries - bursaries of $1,000 to be granted each year; Must be registered in a recognized trade/community/technical college diploma or certificate program; Preference will be given to those enrolled in a program relating to the natural gas industry; Maximum one award per applicant per calendar year; Must re-apply to be considered for subsequent years 

  • Scholarships - scholarships of $1,500 to be awarded each year; Must be registered in a university program intended to lead to a bachelor or graduate degree; Preference will be given to those enrolled in a program relating to the natural gas industry; Maximum one award per applicant per calendar year; Must re-apply to be considered for subsequent years

ELIGIBILITY

All applicants must be enrolled full-time in a secondary or post-secondary educational program, be Canadian citizens of Aboriginal ancestry and originate from within 50km of ATCO Pipelines facilities. ATCO employees and/or their children will not be considered for these awards.

HOW TO APPLY

Downloadable Application Form (pdf )

The deadline to submit an application is August 1st annually. Applications received after that date will not be considered during the review and selection process.

The following information must ALL be included in the application package in order to be regarded for any one of these awards:

  • A completed application form 

  • One reference letter from a teacher, faculty member, employer or community leader 

  • A short essay (minimum 250 words) describing why you are a suitable candidate for the award 

  • Proof of enrollment for the upcoming semester in a secondary or post-secondary institution

  • Transcripts from a secondary and/or post-secondary institution in which you are currently enrolled

Mail or deliver completed application packages, and direct official transcripts, to:

Corporate Communications
ATCO Pipelines
#1300, 909 – 11th Avenue SW
Calgary, AB  T2R 1L8

Website: http://www.atcopipelines.com/Community/Aboriginal-Education-Awards-Program

SELECTION

All applications will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of representatives from various departments within ATCO Pipelines. Committees will be established each year specifically to review candidate submissions for this program.

Poster: http://www.atcopipelines.com/Community/Documents/Ab_Awards_Poster_FINAL.pdf


Indigenous Scholarship Program - Holiday Inn Vancouver Downtown

Value: $2,000
Number: Varies
Deadline: Scholarships awarded throughout the year

Conceived and established in 2003 by Holiday Inn Vancouver Downtown, the Indigenous Scholarship Program sets aside program funds for every room night spent at the hotel by a member of Canada's Aboriginal Community.

Each year, the hotel will award at least one scholarship to First Nation youth that are pursuing a post-secondary education. Open to all Aboriginal students, the Indigenous Scholarship Program considers a number of criteria in awarding scholarships including financial situation, academic achievement, community involvement and career aspirations. The Indigenous Scholarship Program is managed by Holiday Inn Vancouver Downtown with recommendations from an Executive Education Committee and input from an Advisory Board made up of representatives from Canada's Aboriginal Community.

Eligibility: Aboriginal/Indigenous student currently enrolled at or, accepted to a post secondary institution.

Application: Application form and eligibility criteria for the Indigenous Scholarship Program can be obtained by calling the Holiday Inn Vancouver Downtown at 1-800-663-9151.

Web site: holidayinnvancouverdowntown.com


Helen Bassett Commemorative Student Award

Deadline: July 27

Every year since 2003 the Native Women’s Association of Canada
coordinates the Helen Bassett Commemorative Student Award (previously a scholarship) that is awarded to four young Aboriginal women in the amount of $1,000.00 dollars each in accordance with the four directions (North, East, South and West). This Student Award is NWAC’s way of supporting Aboriginal women strive for their academic goals, as well as recognizing the dedication and commitment that they are making toward the well-being of their sisters and their communities. The Helen Bassett Commemorative Student Award is facilitated through the Youth Program of the Labour Market Development Department and is made possible by the generous donation of Helen Bassett.

http://nwac.ca/nwac-helen-bassett-commemorative-student-award


KPMG's Aboriginal Scholarship Program 

KPMG’s Aboriginal Services is proud to offer five $1,500 scholarships

The scholarship program is designed to recognize the Aboriginal community and offer financial assistance to Aboriginal students attending post-secondary institutions across Canada. 

Selection Criteria

Weighting will be proportionally focused on the following categories:

  • Future plans to support the Aboriginal community
  • Future career plans
  • Current and/or projected financial situation
  • Current involvement in the Aboriginal community and other organizations
  • Grade point average

Requirements of Scholarship Recipients

  • Willing and available for media interviews
  • Willing and available to be photographed
  • Provide permission to be referenced and quoted in KPMG and/or KPMG approved material, websites and publications
  • Provide permission for use of photos in KPMG and/or KPMG approved material, websites and publications

How to submit your application

1. Provide it directly to your local KPMG adviser

2. Email to: aboriginalservices@kpmg.ca

3. Mail to: Penny Eggett, National Marketing Coordinator
                KPMG MSLP
                333 Bay Street, Suite 4600
                Toronto, ON M5H 2S5


TransAlta Aboriginal Bursary Program

In keeping with our commitment to provide educational support to the Aboriginal community in Canada, on an annual basis TransAlta offers up to seven bursary awards in the amount of $3000 each for those entering college or university programs on a full time basis. Additionally, TransAlta offers three awards in the amount of $1000 each for those in a trades program.

Eligibility Criteria
1. You are an Aboriginal person, and provide proof of your status
2. You are enrolled in a fulltime post secondary or trades program and will maintain satisfactory academic standing throughout your program
3. You have a plan for achieving your education and career goals
4. You commit to updating TransAlta on your progress throughout the duration of your studies
5. You complete and provide the information as requested by TransAlta
 
Deadline: September 15
 
You must submit the application form and all requested documentation by September 15th to be considered. Additional information and a copy of the application form can be found on the website: http://www.transalta.com/communities/aboriginal

Contact Information:
Lynn Calf Robe, Aboriginal Relations Coordinator
TransAlta
Phone: 403 267 2557
Fax: 403 267 2005
Email: lynn_calfrobe@transalta.com


Strategic Alliance of Broadcasters for Aboriginal Reflection (SABAR) Scholarship

Deadline: Not being awarded in 2015

SABAR is pleased to offer our first annual Scholarship to an Aboriginal student in Journalism or Radio/Television Arts. SABAR is particularly proud to play an important part in supporting the development of a future community leader who may have the potential to help us meet our primary goal of increasing Aboriginal reflection in Canadian broadcasting.
Eligibility
1. First Nations, Inuit or Métis permanent Canadian resident;
2. Desire to follow a path to a career in the broadcast industry;
3. Enrolment in Canadian post secondary Journalism or Radio and Television Arts Program or Equivalent Certified Training Program; and
4. Interest in acting as an ambassador for the broadcasting industry and serving as a role model for other Aboriginal people to encourage them to pursue careers in broadcasting.
 
Guidelines:
One scholarship valued at $5,000.00 will be awarded. This award may be applied to academic and/or living costs.

Scholarship winners are eligible for continued scholarship awards each year they continue in their approved programs in the amount of $2,500.00 annually to a maximum total scholarship value of $10,000.00.

For more information: www.sabar.ca


ECO Canada Scholarships

ECO Canada is pleased to launch the 2012 Newalta Aboriginal Environmental Scholarship. The scholarship, generously sponsored by Newalta, will award $2,500 each to three Aboriginal students across Canada.

Closes: May 14
 
Eligibility:
To qualify for the Newalta Aboriginal Environmental Scholarship, applicants must:
* Be a Canadian resident Aboriginal individual who is First Nation status or non-status, Métis, or Inuit
* Be 30 years of age or younger, with a high school diploma
* Have been accepted into an environment-related program at a Canadian post-secondary institution for the fall of 2012
* Submit a 500-word description of their environmental values, leadership, or vision
* Demonstrate their accomplishments and ambitions in the areas of environmental protection, resource management, or environmental sustainability
* Provide a reference letter describing the applicant's character and highlighting any involvement in community-related environmental projects

*Please note if you are not already an ECO member, you will be asked to register for a free account before you are redirected to your application form.
 
All applications must be submitted by May 14.

For more information or for assistance with your application, contact Rebecca Dickson at scholarships@eco.ca or 403-233-0748.
 
Scholarships are awarded to individuals who have shown leadership in their communities in the areas of environmental protection, resource management, or environmental sustainability. Students are chosen based on the reference letter and essay they submit about their environmental accomplishments and ambitions.

The award is provided for the first year of tuition in an environment-related program, including but not limited to: engineering, sciences, social sciences, and mathematics. Browse our Program Directory for more information on environment-related programs.


GE Foundation Scholar-Leaders Program in Canada

The GE Foundation Scholar-Leaders Program in Canada is a unique program that provides financial support and skills development opportunities for up to 5 accomplished first-year undergraduate students from recognized institutions who are pursuing degrees in the fields of engineering or business/management and are Canadian resident Aboriginal individuals who are either First Nation status or non-status, Métis or Inuit

Why Apply?
· A $4000 per year scholarship for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th years of your undergraduate program
· An opportunity to be mentored by a business leader at GE in Canada
· Participation in GE Foundation Scholar-Leaders activities, including a specially designed leadership development seminar at GE Canada in Mississauga, Ontario
· Participation in community development projects

Who Can Apply?
Only applicants who meet the eligibility criteria described below will be considered for the award
Aboriginal peoples who:
· Are Canadian residents
· Are first-year full-time undergraduate students at a recognized Canadian university
· Are studying engineering or business/management
· Have high academic performance, as demonstrated by first semester university results and high school transcripts.
· Demonstrate financial need
How to Apply?
Click on the link at the bottom of the page and complete the online application.

The application form including essay must be submitted online by 11:59pm EST on March 15 each year. All Supporting Documentation must arrive via post by March 15 to:

GE Foundation Scholar-Leaders Program in Canada
Institute of International Education
809 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017
USA

Supporting Documentation – In addition to your application form, the following documentation is required:
1. Certification Page with original signature (downloaded from online application)
2. High school transcripts – official copy, may be sent directly by high school
3. First semester university results (if available) – official copy, may be sent directly by university
4. Two letters of recommendation (see instructions on form which can be downloaded from the online application)
5. Proof of Aboriginal ancestry – photocopy of Band/Treaty card; Métis membership card; Inuit Beneficiary card. Students who are non-status First Nation may send a photocopy of the band card issued to parent or grandparent.

English translations must accompany any documents not in English.

Incomplete application materials or application materials received after March 15, 2011 will not be considered. Application materials will not be returned to applicants.
What is the Selection Procedure?

A selection committee will evaluate all applications. Each applicant’s motivation and academic potential will be assessed.

Who Can I Contact for More Information?

If you have any questions, please contact IIE:
Email: gefslp-canada@iie.org
Phone: 1–800-486–0308
Fax: 1–212-205–6466

Complete the GE Foundation Scholar-Leaders Application Here: http://apply.scholarshipandmore.org/


Dr. William Commanda Willis Scholarship

Willis College, with 11 locations across Ontario, is announcing the scholarship in partnership with TeKnoWave Inc.
 
Willis College of Business, Health & Technology and TeKnoWave Inc. are proud of its association with Elder and Grandfather Dr. William Commanda and have chosen to establish The Dr. William Commanda Scholarship in Clean Energy and Business Education. 

The scholarship will be awarded annually to eleven Aboriginal students from across Canada who would otherwise not have the opportunity to obtain the career-oriented education provided at Willis College.

The scholarship will accommodate one Aboriginal person, per location, to take one program in clean energy or business valued at ten thousand dollars.  The Scholarship provides tuition and book cost for a one year program at Willis College. The student may select courses from the curriculum offered at the time of selection. Students will also be able to choose which Willis College location they wish to attend.

The evaluation and award process will take place annually in Ottawa with many prominent individuals involved on the scholarship board of trustees. Students of First Nations, Métis or Inuit heritage will be chosen based on academics and community involvement along with other criteria.   The scholarship is administered by The Dr. William Commanda Board of Trustees.

Interested candidates must apply by July 1. To find out how, click here.

Willis College of Business, Health, & Technology established in 1896 stands as an ongoing testament to the creativity, tenacity, and strength of Canadian private career colleges and maintains a corporate mission statement to provide a quality adult educational learning environment where the creative interests and development of our students are paramount. Willis specializes in accredited adult career education. Students may take individual courses to upgrade their skills or enroll in a full career program that leads them to attractive jobs in the clean energy and business sectors.

Algonquin Elder William Commanda from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, Maniwaki, Quebec was born on November 11, 1913. He was acclaimed chief of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg for over nineteen years. He received an Honorary Doctorate Degree from the University of Ottawa in 2005. In December 2008, he was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada and in November 2009, the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards Foundation announced his selection as the  2010 Lifetime Achievement Award recipient.

Details
”The Scholarship” was announced in January 11th, 2010. The Scholarship carries a nominal value, at the time of announcement, of $110,000.

The scholarship will accommodate one Aboriginal person, per location, to take one program in clean energy or business valued at ten thousand dollars. Students will be able to choose which Willis College location they wish to attend.

The Scholarship is available to qualified First Nations, Inuit and Métis students to pursue clean energy and business studies.

The Scholarship is awarded annually to a qualified student selected by the Dr. William Commanda Scholarship Board of Trustees Selection Committee.
The Scholarship provides tuition and books for up to a one year program at Willis College of Business, Health and Technology’s eleven locations. The student may select courses from the curriculum offered at the time of selection.

The Scholarship is non-transferable and may be applied to academic career courses only.

The student may attend courses during a 12-month period from the time the courses are started at Willis College campuses offering the selected courses.
Interested candidates must apply by July 1. To find out how, click here.

Any Aboriginal student in Canada who wishes to apply may do so directly through Willis College by July 1st. The candidate selection will be made by the Dr. William Commanda Scholarship Board of Trustees and will entitle the winner to attend the program of his/her choice at any of the Willis College campuses across Ontario.
Selection Process
 
Basis of Selection
The Selection Committee is looking for candidates with proven intellectual and academic ability, integrity of character, interest and respect for fellow human beings, ability to lead, demonstrate leadership and creativity in the areas of environmental stewardship and sustainable relationships, appreciation for education, and initiative to use their talents to the fullest.

Method of Selection
A Selection Committee, consisting of representatives of the Dr. William Commanda Scholarship Board of Trustees, will choose the successful candidate. The decision of the Selection Committee is final.

Method of Application
The completed application, with all the required information must be forwarded to:

Selection Committee Dr. William Commanda Scholarship Board of Trustees
c/o Willis College of Business, Health & Technology
85 O'Connor Street
Ottawa, ON K1P 5M6

Admission Status

The applicant must:
(i) Have a minimum of Grade 12 high school or be of age of 19 and over; and
(ii) Provide a transcript of marks from a previous academic institution.

Payment of Award
The successful candidate will be presented with the award and a commemorative certificate at The Dr. William Commanda Scholarship Award Annual General Assembly, which is held each summer at Willis College Ottawa campus.



Canada - US Fulbright Program


Deadline: November 15

Student must be American or Canadian with Native Heritage and attending a post-secondary education institution studying countries relations between other countries. Value of award is $15,000.00 for student and $25,000.00 for faculty members enrolled in graduate studies.

For more information contact:

350 Albert Street, Suite 2015,
Ottawa, Ontario, K1R 1A4
Ph: (613) 688-5540   Fax: (613) 237-2029
E-mail: info@fulbright.ca
web site:  www.fulbright.ca



Canadian Merit Scholarship Foundation (CMSF):

The CMSF Awards program was started in 1989 to identify, recognize and reward well-rounded students who combine distinguished talents with character, leadership potential, and a commitment to the community.

The CMSF National Awards
The CMSF National Award is our most prestigious scholarship. It is awarded after a rigorous process, which includes the written application and extensive interviews.. A description of the National Awards follows:
Up to 35 National Awards are offered to students bound for one of our 25 participating Canadian universities. The top National Award is valued at up to $8000 cash and up to $8000 in annual tuition for up to four years of full-time study, plus up to $7500 in summer program funding over the course of a degree.

The CMSF Finalist Awards

CMSF Finalist Award are valued at $2,500 and are one-time entrance awards tenable at any accredited university in Canada at which the recipient gains admission and enrolls in a full-time program of study. A Finalist Award is offered to every finalist who participates in National Selections but is not offered a CMSF National Award.

The CMSF Provincial Awards
CMSF Provincial Award are valued at $1,500 and are one-time only entrance awards tenable at any accredited university in Canada at which the recipient gains admission and enrolls in a full-time program of study.

All Canadian Merit Scholarship Foundation (CMSF) Awards inquires contact:
Canadian Merit Scholarship Foundation (CMSF)
53 Yonge Street, 5th floor
Toronto, ON M5E 1J3
1-866-544-2673
Website www.cmsf.ca


Garfield Weston Merit Scholarships for Colleges (GWMSC)

Deadline: March 27

Eligibility:
1) Be in the final year of study for a high school diploma OR be an adult in the work force.
2) Must NOT be university degree or college diploma graduate within the last 3 years.
3) Demonstrate an academic ability that will ensure success in their chosen course of study.
4) Demonstrate leadership potential.
5) Present a record of service to the school and/or community.
6) Demonstrate an interest in his/her selected field of study.
7) Be accepted at an accredited community college for 2-4 year diploma studies in the academic year after selection.

National Award:
Up to 50 available annually
For each National Award the colleges make a tuition grant of up to $4500 per year. In addition to this, the GWMSC offers up to $8000 per year as a stipend.
The National Award is renewable for up to 4 years of diploma studies only at our participating colleges.

To renew the National Award, award holders must:
1) Show continued evidence of character, leadership and service
2) Maintain an acceptable academic record under a full course load

GWMSC Regional Award:
Up to 30 available annually @ $4000 Award

GWMSC Provincial Award:
Up to 25 available annually @ $2500 Award
Regional and Provincial Awards are one-time awards for use at any accredited community college in Canada.

All GWMSC Awards inquires contact:

Web Site: www.garfieldwestonawards.ca



Sir John A. MacDonald graduate fellowship in Canadian History

This scholarship is awarded to a student enrolling in a doctoral program in Canadian history at an Ontario university. The value of award is $8,500.00 and can be renewed for three consecutive years to a maximum of $25,500.00.
For more information contact:

The Graduate Studies Office at Ontario Universities or
The Ministry of Education and Training
Student Affairs
PO Box 4500
189 Red River Road, 4th Floor
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6G9
Phone: (807) 343-7257 or 1-800-465-3957


Gil Purcell Memorial Journalism Award - The Canadian Press

To a Native person studying journalism.
Value: One scholarship of $4,000
Eligibility: Native ancestry.

Studying journalism at a Canadian university or community college.

Deadline: November 15 of each year.

Mrs. Deborah McCartney
Administrative Assistant - HR
The Canadian Press
36 King Street East
Toronto, ON M5C 2L9
Tel: 416-507-2132
Fax: 416-507-2033

E-Mail: dmccartney@cp.org


The Canadian Medical Foundation Dr. John Big Canoe Memorial Scholarship

Deadline: Applications and supporting documentation for the 2009/2010 academic year must be received by October 2010.

During each year of the program, a $2000 scholarship may be awarded to an undergraduate Aboriginal student enrolled in the last or second to last year of study in a Canadian school of medicine who has demonstrated both strong academic performance and outstanding contributions to the aboriginal community in Canada.
Applications and supporting documentation to:

Marie-Jeanne Schoueri, Office Manager
The Canadian Medical Foundation,
1867 Alta Vista Drive,
Ottawa, ON K1G 3H7
Phone: (613) 520-7681
Toll Free: 1-866-530-4979
Fax: (613) 520-7692
Email: marie-jeanne.schoueri@cmf.ca

Web site: www.medicalfoundation.ca


Canadian Medical Association Special Bursary Program for Undergraduate Aboriginal Medical Students

Deadline: October 9

The bursary is awarded based on financial need and will provide a maximum of $4000 per academic year to each successful applicant. A total of up to $40,000 in bursaries may be awarded in each academic year of the program. Given that financial resources are often limited by the end of the academic year, bursaries will be awarded at this time. Bursary recipients will also receive memberships in the CMA, the relevant division of CMA (provincial or territorial) and the Native Physicians Association in Canada.

Applications and supporting documentation to:
Marie-Jeanne Schoueri, Office Manager
The Canadian Medical Foundation,
1867 Alta Vista Drive,
Ottawa, ON K1G 3H7
Phone: (613) 520-7681
Toll Free: 1-866-530-4979
Fax: (613) 520-7692
Email: marie-jeanne.schoueri@cmf.ca

Web site: www.medicalfoundation.ca


Heroes of our Time Scholarships - Assembly of First Nations

Sponsored by: Assembly of First Nations
Eligibility: First Nations Citizen
Value: TBA
Deadline Date: June 1 each year

Tommy Prince Award
Walter Dieter Award
Omer Peters Award

Robert Smallboy Award
James Gosnell Award

Applications submitted to:
Selection Committee – Heroes of Our Time Awards
The Assembly of First Nations – Education Sector
473 Albert Street - Suite 810
Ottawa, ON K1R 5B4
 
Toll-Free: 1-866-869-6789
Phone: (613) 241-6789
Fax: (613) 241-5808


Tom Longboat Award

Sponsored by: The Aboriginal Sport Circle
Eligibility: Nominations are invited from all levels of sport. To be eligible, nominees must meet the following criteria:
Must be of Aboriginal descent

Must have amateur status in the sport which they are nominated

Must be for athletic achievements within the awards calendar year

Must submit a completed Nomination Form to the appropriate Provincial/Territorial
Aboriginal Sport Body on or before the annual deadline.
Value: TBA

Criteria: Currently enrolled/accepted in medical program, demonstrated exceptional academic abilities, involved and committed to extra-curricular activities

Deadline Date: January each year.

For more information contact :
Aboriginal Sport Circle at
Email: mtrudeau@aboriginalsportcircle.ca
Ph: (613) 236-9624 ext. 223
website: www.aboriginalsportcircle.ca


Federal Student Work Experience Program (FSWEP)
FSWEP replaces the Federal Summer Student Employment Program

Offers full-time high school, CDGEP, college, technical institute and university students the opportunity to apply for student jobs with the federal government

Application forms are available at student career offices at colleges, GEGEPS, technical institutions and universities, Human Resources Centres of Canada, and PSC Regional and District offices.


Canada Trust Scholarship for Outstanding Community Leadership

Full tuition plus $3,500 toward living expenses
Guaranteed offer of summer employment at Canada Trust
Deadline: October 31
Contact: 1-800-308-8306


Investing in the future growth of Aboriginal Youth - Canadian National

CN makes awards available to Inuit, status or non-status Indian or Métis students entering or enrolled full-time in a post-secondary program in Canada that leads to a career in the transportation industry. This includes fields such as engineering, business, computer science, communications and technical studies.

Deadline: June 1 of each year.

For more info. contact your band office, friendship centre or college of your choice
Web Site: www.cn.ca/en/careers-offer-scholaships-aboriginal-awards.htm
To obtain further information or an application form, please contact:

Aboriginal Awards Program
c/o National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation
70 Yorkville Avenue, Suite 33A
Toronto, Ontario M5R 1B9
Telephone: 1-800-329-9780 (toll-free)


CN Scholarship For Women

Deadline: October 15 each year
CN encourages women to pursue non-traditional careers in areas such as trades, technology and operations. To date, participation by women in these fields has been limited. This is a special CN initiative aimed at promoting employment equity in Canada. Scholarships are awarded annually to women in selected community colleges and institutes of technology across Canada.

Web Site: www.cn.ca/en/careers-offer-scholarships-women.htm


Educational Awards Program - Husky Oil

Deadline: May 31

Awards announced: July 31
Up to 7 Aboriginal students are selected each year.
Awards of up to $3,000 per year will be granted to cover a portion of tuition, books, or living expenses.
Aboriginal people (Inuit, Metis, Status and Non Status Indians) who meet the following qualifications:
* Canadian citizen
* in need of financial assistance
* demonstrate serious interest in furthering their educational and career development

Preference will be given to applicants whose residence is located on or near one of Husky's exploration, development or operation sites

Individuals pursuing academic post-secondary studies at a university, community college or technical institute are eligible to apply.

Diversity and Aboriginal Affairs
Husky Oil Operations Limited
P.O. Box 6525, Station D
Calgary, Alberta T2P 3G7


RBC Aboriginal Student Awards

Deadline: January 31

Ten (10) awards of up to $4,000/ year for four (4) years at university or two years at college.
* You are a permanent resident or citizen of Canada
* You have been accepted to or are currently attending an accredited post-secondary institution in Canada
* You maintain a full course load that leads to a recognized degree, certificate or diploma
* You require financial assistance to pursue your education

A committee of Aboriginal academics and RBC representatives review all completed applications and makes the final selection of the award recipients primarily based on personal and academic achievements and individual financial need. Successful applicants are notified of the committee's decision by June 15 of each year. All decisions of the committee are final.

You will receive up to $4,000 per academic year for educational and living expenses for a maximum of four years. To receive the full amount for all years of study, you must attend an accredited post-secondary institution, remain in the program of study we awarded the scholarship for and maintain a full-time course load and good academic standing. RBC requests confirmation of your full course load and good academic standing at the beginning of every fall and winter semester. This confirmation will be collected in a way satisfactory to RBC. You will receive the first half of your scholarship at the beginning of the fall semester. If you maintain a good academic standing, you will receive the balance in January. Please note that RBC reserves the right to change or discontinue this program at any time. We will honour commitments already in place if the program changes or ends.

Toll-Free Fax: 1-866-780-2188

Toll-Free Fax: 1-866-780-2188

Mail:
RBC Aboriginal Student Awards
C/O Aboriginal Link
PO Box 50058, 17-2595 Main Street
Winnipeg, MB R2V 4W3

 
www.gotoapply.ca/RBC


CMHC Housing Awards: Housing for Youth

Individuals, firms, institutions and government agencies that are delivering programs that improve choice, quality or affordability of housing for youth may be nominated for a Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) Housing Award. Awards and honourable mentions are given to those individuals or groups that have achieved excellence in one of five categories: financing and tenure, technology and production, planning and regulation, concept and design, and process and management.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Social and Economic Policy and Research
700 Montreal Road Room C7-417
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0P7
Phone: 1-800-668-2642
Web: www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca


Polaris - Northern Star Program

This awards program recognizes the creative and innovative environmental actions by youth who have had an impact within their communities.
Young people up to 25 years of age may be nominated for an award. Completed forms are due by March 31 of each year.
For more information and a nomination form, call the Action 21 National Office toll free at: 1 800 668-6767.


Department of Justice Canada Entrance Scholarships for Aboriginal Students

The Department of Justice Canada has made available three-year scholarships to Metis and non-status Indian students who wish to attend law school. Each year, ten or more pre-law scholarships will be made available to Metis and non-status Indians, to cover the cost of attending a summer orientation program offered by the Native Law Centre, University of Saskatchewan, in Saskatoon and a summer French language pre-law orientation program at the University of Ottawa.
In September, ten or more three-year law school scholarships will be made available to Metis and non-status applicants to defray their living costs, textbooks, tuition fees, and other costs.
The Department of Justice Canada is accepting applications for the summer pre-law program until 1 April, and applications for the law school scholarships until 1 June. Students interested in both programs must forward two separate applications.

For further information and application forms,contact:
Program Assistant,
Legal Studies for Aboriginal People Program,
Department of Justice Canada,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H8

Similar financial assistance is available from Indian and Northern Affairs for registered Indian and Inuit students.


Sears Canada Inc. Scholarship:
Deadline June 1

Ten scholarships of $1,000 are available to children of Sears employees. Applications are available from and submitted to:

Canadian Awards Program,
International & Canadian Programs Division,
Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada,
Suite 600, 350 Albert Street,
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 1B1
Web: www.aucc.com


Chevron Canada Resources

Deadline: January 31

Number of scholarships varies, value up to $5,000
Available to students of Aboriginal heritage interested in undertaking a period of study in public administration and/or community affairs involving drug/alcohol education and rehabilitation. Special consideration given to residents of Northwest territories and other areas of concern.

Parent must be Chevron employee

Apply to: Canadian Universities for Northern Studies
#201, 130 Albert Street,
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5G4
Phone: (613) 238-3525


TD Bank and First Nations Bank of Canada Aboriginal Education Awards

Deadline: March 31

Value: Five awards of $1,000 each Recipients will also receive consideration for summer employment and full-time employment once education is complete.
Criteria: Applicants must be of Aboriginal ancestry (Status, Non-Status, Inuit, Métis); full time student at recognized Canadian post secondary institutionpursuing a program relevant to a career in banking such as business, economics, computer science, math and sciences; in need of financial assistance to further educational goals.

Apply to:
Award Coordinator
Toronto Dominion Centre
201 Portage Avenue
P.O. Box 7700
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3E7


J. Michael Waldram Fellowships - The Canadian Model Forest Network and the Canadian Institute of Forestry

The Canadian Model Forest Network, together with the Canadian Institute of Forestry, has awarded J. Michael Waldram Fellowships of $1000 each to three students in resource management programs in British Columbia and Quebec.

The J. Michael Waldram Fellowship was first awarded in 2008 and is given annually to assist Aboriginal youths pursuing studies in natural resource management at the college or university level.

This award honours Mike Waldram, General Manager of the Manitoba Model Forest from 1993 to 2006. As General Manager, Waldram strove to enhance the participation of Aboriginal peoples in the model forest and in forest resource management.

The Canadian Model Forest represents Canada's 14 Model Forests, in a shared vision of advancing sustainable forests and sustainable communities.
Contact:
David Winston, President, CMFN
Phone: 613-258-8400 or dwinston@cmfn-rcfm.ca


AMEC Aboriginal Undergraduate Engineering Scholarship

Deadline: January 15
Value: $5,000

In conjunction with AMEC, CEMF offers up to one $5000 Undergraduate Engineering Scholarship annually to young Canadian Aboriginal women who are proven leaders and active in their community to encourage them to pursue a career in engineering. Applicants must be enrolled full-time in an accredited Canadian undergraduate engineering program of study and be:
1. In their first year, or
2. In their second year, or
3. In the first term of their third year, immediately prior to the December deadline.
Scholarships are based primarily on demonstrated community leadership and involvement in extra-curricular activities. Special emphasis is placed on leadership to recognize and encourage continued contributions to Canadian society.
Work experience may also be considered.
High marks are not one of the criteria for this scholarship.
Applicants must be willing to act as role models and promote engineering as a career choice to young Aboriginal girls - each Scholarship winner will be required to make at least one presentation to a high-school level audience of Aboriginal youth.
Scholarship funds may be used by the winner as she wishes. Successful applicants will be paid in two installments - $3,000 within approximately four months of the application deadline date and $2,000 twelve months after the first installment, upon submission of:
1. Confirmation in writing of continued enrollment in engineering prior to payment of the first installment and proof of promotion to the next year or term of engineering study.
2. A written report to CEMF prior to payment of the second installment which shall
include:
a. A written update of community and extra-curricular involvement
demonstrating leadership qualities,
b. Proof of having made at least one presentation to a high-school Aboriginal
audience including a letter of confirmation from an attending teacher,
c. Proof of promotion to the next year of engineering study.
The Foundation reserves the right to not issue a scholarship in any given year.
A Committee appointed by the Foundation will select the winners, with the Judges being both engineers and non-engineers. The Committee's assessment will be based on all of the information provided with the application. Any application that is incomplete in any way will be rejected prior to judging and another application will not be accepted until the following year. The decision of the Judges will be final.
Eligibility Requirements
Applicants must be Canadian Aboriginals with permanent residence in Canada. In accordance with the Constitution Act, 1982, Part II, Section 35(2), an Aboriginal applicant is an Indian, Inuit, or Métis person of Canada, or a person who is accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community.
The following will be accepted as proof of ancestry:
* A certified copy of a Status or Treaty card;
* A certified copy of a Métis membership card;
* A certified copy of an Nunavut Trust Certificate card, roll number or any other proof accepted by Inuit communities;
* Proof that an ancestor's name has been entered
- in the Indian Register according to the Indian Act, or
- on the Band list of an individual Band, or
- on the Inuit roll;
* Evidence of an ancestor who received a land grand or a script grant
under the Manitoba Act or the Dominion Lands Act;
* Written confirmation of Aboriginal ancestry from the Department of
Indian Affairs;
* A Statutory Declaration by an Applicant attesting to Aboriginal
ancestry, supplemented by letters or documentation supporting that
Declaration
- from an official or a recognized native organization, or
- from a relative in the Aboriginal community, or
- from the Applicant describing involvement with Aboriginal
issues.
All applicants must be enrolled in a Canadian university accredited engineering program.
Previous AMEC Scholarship Winners are not eligible to apply although unsuccessful applicants may re-apply in a subsequent year if they qualify.
There is no limitation on the number of applications from any university or program.
All applications must be submitted by all applicants directly to:
The Canadian Engineering Memorial Foundation
AMEC Undergraduate Engineering Scholarship Award
P. O. Box 370, 1-247 Barr Street
Renfrew, Ontario
K7V 4A6
www.cemf.ca


The Department of National Defence Security and Defence Forum (SDF)

SDF Aboriginal Scholarship Program
Value: $10,000
Number available: The Security and Defence Forum has set aside up to $10,000 a year to fund Aboriginal scholars. The exact number and value awarded annually will depend on the number and quality of applicants. Scholarship funds may cover tuition fees and or expenses related to a degree program, including – but not limited to – support for distance learning.
Deadline: The 2006 competition is now closed.
Objective: The Security and Defence Forum Aboriginal scholarship is intended to help develop and promote scholarly interest in contemporary Canadian security and defence issues among members of the First Nations (status or non-status), Inuit, and Métis Canadians. Security and defence issues include, but are not limited to:
* Failed or failing states
* Terrorism
* Weapons of Mass Destruction
* Regional flashpoints
* Canadian Forces Transformation, including integrated and unified approaches to operations
* The Defence of Canada
* Canada-United States defence relations
* The Canadian Forces' international role
* The Integrated Defence, Diplomacy and Development ("3D") approach to conflict and post-conflict situations
* Defence procurement and management
* National Defence's support to other government departments and agencies
In addition to financial support for security and defence studies, the Security and Defence Forum also introduces recipients to the Policy Group of National Defence Headquarters and provides award recipients with the opportunity to have their research circulated within the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces.

Fields of study:
Social sciences/humanities studies relating to current and future Canadian security and defence issues, including their political, international, historical, social, military, and economic dimensions. Research in the pure or applied sciences is ineligible. Applicants must explain in their proposal the relationship of their study/research plans to Canadian security and defence issues.
Eligibility:
* Applicants must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents at the time of application and be of either a member of the First Nations (status or non-status), Inuit or Métis.
* Applicants must, as a minimum requirement, hold an Honours Bachelor's degree (four year program) or its equivalent before taking up the award.

Duration:
One academic year, and can be used to assist students in continuing their graduate studies at university and/or to purchase technology required to assist distance learning
Eligible institutions: Graduate scholarships are tenable only at Canadian institutions.

For more information: For complete information and application form please visit the DND website. If you wish to have an application form emailed to you, please contact awards@aucc.ca
Ph: (613) 563-1236 -- Fax: (613) 563-9745
Aboriginal: www.aucc.ca/scholarships/dnd/aboriginal_e.html


CSA Spaceflight and Life Sciences Training Program Scholarship

The trainee(s) will be sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency and will receive:
* round trip transportation between their home in Canada and the Orlando International Airport in Florida
* accommodation in the Cocoa Beach area
* local transportation to and from the Kennedy Space Center
* a daily meal allowance, which should also cover some other expenses
Eligibility

- limited to currently enrolled full-time undergraduate students who:
* are pursuing their first undergraduate B.Sc. degree in a life science program at a recognized university
* have a minimum cumulative average of 75% at the time of application
* will have completed their second or third year of study (first year or second year of study in the case of Quebec students, called, respectively, U1 and U2 by the Quebec Ministére de l'Éducation) by the start of the training program
* are proficient in English (score of at least 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language, TOEFL);
* are Canadian citizens, who have or can obtain a valid Canadian passport and are at least 18 years of age

Web Site: www.space.gc.ca/slstp

Email address for inquiries: slstp@space.gc.ca

CSA Space Exploration Scholarship - www.space.gc.ca/ses
Email address for inquiries: ses@space.gc.ca

How to Apply
Application materials include:
1. A completed Space Life Sciences Training Program Application Form (pdf document).
2. A 500-word typed double spaced essay which will be used to evaluate the applicant's experience and written communication skills.
The essay should contain three parts:
1. A paragraph covering the classroom, laboratory and research experiences of the applicant in the life sciences,
2. A paragraph demonstrating the applicant's knowledge of space research, interest in space life sciences, and
3. How the Training Program will further their career goals. The applicant's full name must appear on each page of the essay.
3. TWO completed Reference Request Forms (pdf document) from people familiar with the academic and/or research record of the applicant. References can be sent a) directly by the referee or b) by the applicant. If sent by the student, the reference must be submitted in a sealed envelope with the referee's original signature over the seal. References sent by both submission methods must arrive by the stated deadline.

4. An official transcript from every college, cégep, and university attended, up to and including the fall of the current academic year. Grade notifications in possession of the applicant will not be considered.

Please note that SLSTP is presented in English and applications must be submitted in English only.
Completed application materials must be postmarked by January 31 and mailed to:

SLSTP
Space Science Program
Canadian Space Agency
6767 Route de l'Aéroport
Saint-Hubert, QC J3Y 8Y9

Marion Neiman
CSA Scholarships Coordinator

Project Manager/Consultant
Lansdowne Technologies
Suite 1001 - 275 Slater Street
Ottawa ON K1P 5H9

www.lansdowne.com


Toyota Earth Day Scholarship Program

 
Cultivating Tomorrow's Environmental Leaders
Every day, in communities across Canada, young people are actively demonstrating their passion for the environment through the important work they accomplish. These dedicated young Canadians are emerging as tomorrow's environmental leaders and advocates.

Toyota Canada Inc. and Earth Day Canada established the Toyota Earth Day Scholarship Program to help cultivate and nurture this environmental leadership. The Toyota Earth Day Scholarship Program encourages and rewards graduating high school students and Québec junior college students who have distinguished themselves through environmental community service, extracurricular and volunteer activities, and academic excellence.

Because environmental issues are increasingly being tackled through multidisciplinary approaches, future environmental leaders will come from a broad range of academic backgrounds. The Toyota Earth Day Scholarship is offered to students entering their first year of post-secondary studies in the discipline of their choice, to prepare themselves for the career of their choice.
The Toyota Earth Day Scholarship Program grants 15 awards of $5000 each annually, to be applied directly towards tuition, books, room and board (where applicable) or other educational expenses for the first year of post-secondary full-time studies in Canada.
Regional panels of community, business and environmental leaders will select the winners who best meet the selection criteria. Awards will be granted in five geographic areas:
· Atlantic Canada - 2 awards
· Québec - 4 awards
· Ontario - 4 awards
· Western Canada/Northwest Territories/Nunavut - 3 awards
· British Columbia/Yukon - 2 awards
A national winner - selected from the 15 regional winners - will also be awarded an Outstanding Environmental Achievement Award and a Panasonic CF50 ToughbookT notebook computer. The National Award Ceremony will be held in Toronto on Earth Day (April 22), 2009

Application Deadline: Jan 31

For applications and more information please visit: www.earthday.ca/scholarship


Millennium Excellence Awards

Value: Local award winners will receive a one-time $4,000 award.

Provincial/territorial award winners will receive a $4,000 award, renewable up to three times (for a possible total of $16,000). National award winners will receive a $5,000 award, renewable up to three times (for a possible total of $20,000).

Eligibility: The excellence awards recognize, support, and encourage talented Canadians who make positive and significant contributions to the betterment of communities across the country, who demonstrate the capacity for leadership, and are committed to the pursuit of academic excellence and innovation. Only individuals who intend to enter a college or university undergraduate program for the first time may apply.

Duration: N/A

Application Deadline: January 25, 2009
For application information, visit www.aimhigh.ca, or contact:
Millennium Excellence Award Program
Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation
1000 Sherbrooke Street West, Suite 800
Montréal, Québec
H3A 3R2


Alliance Pipeline Aboriginal Student Awards Program

Number: One
Value: Cost of tuition, books and supplies to a maximum of $4,000 per academic year.
Deadline: January 10
Eligibility: Aboriginal students who are: residents of Saskatchewan, Alberta or British Columbia; enrolled in, or have applied to a technical school, college or university, in a program relevant to the oil and gas industry; relevant programs include: mechanical engineering technology, instrumentation engineering technology, electrical engineering technology, power engineering, mechanical engineering or business administration.

Coordinator, Aboriginal Student Awards Program
Alliance Pipeline Ltd., #400
605 5th Avenue South West
Calgary, Alberta T2P 3H5
E-mail: awards@alliance-pipeline.com
Website: www.alliance-pipeline.com


Imperial Oil Aboriginal Scholarships Awards Program

Value: $3,500 (maximum for college) and $4,500 (maximum for university)
The awards are designed to cover tuition, textbooks, supplies and other compulsory fees.

Deadline: June 30 of each year

Imperial Oil Resources offers four individual education awards each year to any person of Aboriginal ancestry entering post-secondary studies. The purpose of the awards program is to encourage people of Aboriginal ancestry to pursue undergraduate post-secondary educational studies in disciplines relevant to the petroleum industry. Applicants must reside in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories or the Yukon for at least one year immediately prior to applying for the award.

Application form, full program guidelines and eligibility details can be obtained by calling Imperial Oil Community and Aboriginal Affairs at 780-639-5194.


Jennifer Robinson Memorial Scholarship - Arctic Institute of North America

Value: One scholarship of $5,000.
The Jennifer Robinson Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a graduate student in northern biology who best exemplifies the qualities of scholarship that the late Jennifer Robinson brought to her studies at the Institute's Kluane Lake Research Station.
Eligibility: Applicants must submit: a brief description of the proposed research (two to three pages),including a clear hypothesis, relevance, title and statement of the purpose of the research, the area and type of study,the methodology and plan for evaluation of findings. A collaborative relationship or work should be briefly identified; three academic reference letters; a complete curriculum vitae with transcripts; and a list of current sources and amounts of research funding, including scholarships, grants and bursaries.

The scholarship committee looks for evidence of northern relevance, and a commitment to field-oriented research.

Deadline: January 10
Executive Director
Arctic Institute of North America
University of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: (403) 220-7515
Fax: (403) 282-4609


Jim Bourque Scholarship - Arctic Institute of North America

Value: One scholarship of $1,000.

The Jim Bourque Scholarship is awarded to a Canadian Aboriginal student who intends to take, or is enrolled in, post-secondary training in education, environmental, traditional knowledge or telecommunications. The scholarship is open to mature students and matriculating students alike.

Eligibility: Each applicant must submit, in 500 words or less, a description of his or her intended program of study and the reasons for the choice of program. In addition, applicants must: .include a copy of their most recent high school or college/university transcript; a signed letter of recommendation from a community leader (e.g.,Town or Band Council, Chamber of Commerce, Métis Local, etc.); a statement of financial need, indicating funding already received or expected; and proof of enrollment in, or application to a post-secondary institution.
Deadline: July 18
Executive Director
Arctic Institute of North America
University of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: (403) 220-7515
Fax: (403) 282-4609



Lorraine Allison Scholarship - Arctic Institute of North America

Value: One scholarship of $2,000.
Eligibility: The Lorraine Allison Scholarship is open to any student enrolled at a Canadian university in a program of graduate study related to northern issues, whose application best addresses academic excellence, a demonstrated commitment to northern research, and a desire for research results to be beneficial to northerners, especially Native northerners. Candidates in biological science fields are preferred, but social science topics are also be considered. Scholars from Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are encouraged to apply.

Each application must contain: a two-page description of the northern studies program and relevant projects being undertaken; three letters of reference from the applicants 'current or past professors; a complete curriculum vitae with academic transcripts; and a list of all current sources of research funding.
Deadline: January 10
Executive Director
Arctic Institute of North America
University of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: (403) 220-7515
Fax: (403) 282-4609


Northern Resident Scholarships - Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies

Value: Four (4) awards of $10,000.
The Northern Scientific Training Program is sponsoring four scholarships, valued at $10,000 each, for students identified as long-term residents of Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon, or the Provincial North, enrolled in full-time, post-secondary programs at the undergraduate level at a Canadian college or university.

 

Northern Resident Award - Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies
Value: Eight (8) awards of $5,000.
The Northern Scientific Training Program is sponsoring eight (8) scholarships valued at $5,000 each for students identified as long term residents of Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon or the Provincial North, currently enrolled in master or doctoral-level programs at a Canadian university.
#Research Support Opportunity in Arctic Environmental Studies - Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies
The Meteorological Service of Canada (a division of Environment Canada) sponsors a unique research support opportunity by providing accommodation, facilities, and services at the High Arctic Weather Station (HAWS) at Eureka on Ellesmere Island, to graduate students at the masters or doctoral level. Preference will be given to environmental research proposals in the physical or biological sciences.

Deadline: March 31
Application materials will not be accepted by fax or email.
Mail complete packages to:

Canadian Northern Studies Trust Awards Program
Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies
17 York Street, Suite 405
Ottawa, ON
K1N 9J6

www.acuns.ca


James W. Bourque Studentship in Northern Geography - Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies

Value: One scholarship of $10,000.
Eligibility: The James W. Bourque Studentship is awarded for research on subjects relating to northern geographical research. While applications are normally from students in geography departments,careful consideration is given to students in related fields. In making its decision, the Management Committee is guided by academic record, potential for development, and the applicant 's interest in, and commitment to, advancing the knowledge and appreciation of the geography of northern regions. If you apply to the James W. Bourque Studentship in Northern Geography and to the Studentship in Northern Studies only one set of official university transcripts and reference letters is necessary.
Deadline: January 31
Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies
17 York Street, Suite 405
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 9J6
Phone: (613) 562-0515
Fax: (613) 562-0533


Intelligent Sensing For Innovative Structures (ISIS) Canada Research Scholarship for Aboriginal People in Engineering

Value: One scholarship of $5,000 per year.
Intelligent Sensing for Innovative Structures (ISIS Canada)is a Network of Centres of Excellence funded by the federal and provincial governments, the university communities and the private sector. The mandate of ISIS Canada is to develop a new generation of sophisticated civil engineering structures for the 21st century.
Eligibility: In order to be eligible,applicants must be graduates in engineering or applied sciences at a Canadian university or be currently enrolled in a degree program, and must be registered in, or intending to proceed to, graduate study in engineering or applied sciences. The scholarship is awarded for a 12-month period and may be renewed for a second year at the discretion of the awarding committee.

Deadline: March 31
ISIS Canada - Scholarship Committee
University of Manitoba
A250 Agricultural and Civil Engineering Building
96 Dafoe Road
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3T 2N2
Attention: Mrs. Kim Archer
Web: www.isiscanada.com/students/scholarships.html


Intelligent Sensing For Innovative Structures (ISIS) Canada - Research Scholarship for Women and Aboriginal People

Value: One scholarship of up to $5,000.
Eligibility: Applicants must: be women or be of Aboriginal ancestry; be engineering graduates or currently enrolled in a degree and intending to pursue graduate studies; be seeking solutions to the deterioration of steel reinforced concrete; and be in third year civil engineering or above.

Deadline: March 31
ISIS Canada - Scholarship Committee
University of Manitoba
A250 Agricultural and Civil Engineering Building
96 Dafoe Road
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3T 2N2
Attention: Mrs. Kim Archer
Web: www.isiscanada.com/students/scholarships.html


National Union Scholarship for Aboriginal Canadians

Value: One scholarship of $1,000.
Eligibility: The award is open to all Aboriginal Canadian students who plan to enter the first year of a public post- secondary education institution full-time, and who are children of, or foster children of, a National Union member. The award is given to the writer of the best 750-1000 word essay on "The importance of quality public services in enhancing the quality of life of Aboriginal Canadians."

Deadline: June 30
Scholarships
National Union of Public and General Employees
15 Auriga Drive
Nepean, Ontario K2E 1B7
Phone: (613) 228-9800
Fax: (613) 228-9801
Email:
ltrepanier@nupge.ca


National Union Scholarship for Visible Minorities

Value: One of $1,000.
Eligibility: The award is open to all visible minority students who plan to enter the first year of a public post-secondary educational institution full-time, and who are the children, or foster children, of a National Union member. The award will be given to the writer of the best 750-1000 word essay on "The importance of quality public services in enhancing the quality of life of visible minorities."

Deadline: June 30
Scholarships
National Union of Public and General Employees
15 Auriga Drive
Nepean, Ontario K2E 1B7
Phone: (613) 228-9800
Fax: (613) 228-9801
Email: ltrepanier@nupge.ca

Northern Scholarships

Tlicho Scholarship Program

Basic Grant available to Tlicho student who are pursue in their education to college, university and institution as a full-time student.

$2,000.00 for Tlicho resident with dependent(s)

$1,500.00 for Tlicho student without dependent(s)

$1,000.00 for Non-resident Tlicho student with/without dependent(s)  

$3,000 for college students - 10 awards available by Diavik Diamond Mines

$5,000 for university students - 8 awards available by BHP/Diavik Diamond Mines

Eligibility:

(1) Must be of Dogrib ancestry.

(2) Must submit a copy of official letter of acceptance into college, university of technical school.
ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE) PROGRAMS DO NOT QUALIFY.

(3) Must provide official transcript of grades from last year of study. This could be high school transcripts, GED marks, or transcripts from a post- secondary institution. Report cards or marks taken off the Internet are not acceptable.

(4) Must provide a personal letter describing personal career aspirations and academic program presently enrolled in or are entering into.

(5) Must provide two reference / support letters.
(6) Must complete scholarship application in full.

Important Notes:
Scholarships are awarded strictly to those with the highest grade point averages in each category.

Scholarships for high school students are also available.

Deadline Date: July 15th of each year.

For an application form or for more information, please contact:

Post Secondary Tlicho Scholarship Program
Tlicho Community Services Agency
 c/o Joe Beaverho, Program Manager
Bag #5
Behchoko, NT X0E-0Y0
Phone: (867) 392-3000
Fax: (867) 392-3001

Email: jbeaverho@tlicho.net


Sahtu Renewable Resources Board

Value: depends on which year of post-secondary study the student will be in while holding the scholarship.

First Year $2000
Second Year $2500
Third & Fourth Year $3500
Graduate (MSc/PhD) $5000

The Sahtu Renewable Resources Board (SRRB) was established as part of the Sahtu Dene and Metis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement, 1993. The SRRB serves as the main instrument of wildlife and forestry management for the Sahtu Settlement Area. The SRRB has established a scholarship/bursary program for students pursuing post-secondary education in a field related to the SRRB's mandate.

Eligibility: Pursuing a college diploma or university degree or minimum 2-year certificate program in renewable resources or a related filed (biology, forestry, or environmental science); priority to a Sahtu Dene or Metis enrolled under the land claim or to a NWT resident who has completed the last 2 years of their high school education in the Sahtu Settlement Area.
* Have a 70% (b-average) or higher in the last year of full-time study
* Minimum 2-year program of study
* Demonstrate financial need
* Must be a full-time student during tenure of the scholarship
* Must maintain a full course load during the tenure of the scholarship
* Evidence of student's involvement in the community
* Statement of future goals

Deadline Date: None

Information:
To obtain an application form, contact:

Sahtu Renewable Resources Board
P.O. Box 134
Tulita, N.W.T X0E 0K0
Phone: (867) 588-4040;
Fax: (867) 588-3324;
E-Mail: director@srrb.nt.ca


Canada Post Bursaries

Value: Varies.

These bursaries were established by the Canada Post Corporation to encourage promising northern Aboriginal students enrolled in diploma programs in Management Studies at Aurora College (Western Arctic) with campuses in Yellowknife, Inuvik, and Fort Smith; and Nunavut Arctic College (Eastern Arctic) with campuses in Iqaluit, Rankin Inlet and Cambridge Bay.

These bursaries are administered and presented by the colleges on behalf of Canada Post Corporation.

Eligibility: Applicants must: be of N.W.T. Aboriginal ancestry; be enrolled in the second year of study at one of the above-mentioned colleges; and demonstrate excellence in the first year of study. To apply, students must submit a brief biography and an official transcript from their first year of study along with references.

Information:
Aurora College Head Office
P.O.Box 1290
For Smith, N.W.T. X0E 0P0
Phone: (867) 872-7012
or
Nunavut Arctic College
P.O.Box 160
Iqaluit, N.W.T. X0A 0H0
Phone: (867) 979-4111


Department of Municipal and community affairs, Government of the Northwest Territories Igal Roth Memorial Community Planning Scholarship

Value: Three scholarships of $1,000.

The Department of Municipal and Community Affairs, Government of he Northwest Territories, is offering assistance to northerners who wish to pursue a career in
community planning.These scholarships are to assist qualifying students obtain post-secondary education in planning for potential employment in the Northwest Territories.

Eligibility: To be eligible for this scholarship,applicants must: have resided in the N.W.T. for at least two years; be attending an approved undergraduate university or college planning program; and show proof of acceptance into an approved planning program as a full-time student prior to commencement of classes.

Information:
Igal Roth Memorial Scholarship
Community Planning Division
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs
Government of the Northwest Territories
Yellowknife, N.W.T.
X1A 2L9


Métis Heritage Association Scholarships

Value: As follows:

1. Ted Trindell Memorial Scholarship $1,500
2. Lena Harrington Memorial Scholarship $1,000
3. Mary Firth Memorial Scholarship $1,000
4. Modeste Mandeville Memorial Scholarship $1,000
5. Harry Camsell Memorial Scholarship $1,000
6. Louis Mercredi Memorial Scholarship $1,000
7. Billy Bourque Memorial Scholarship Varies

Eligibility: Eligible applicants will be assessed by an awards selection committee based upon: academic merit; and financial need.

Interested applicants should submit the following:
A covering letter including any pertinent information the applicant feels is warranted; statement of intent including area of study,course load,why he or she enrolled in the discipline,benefit to self and community,and other information that will support his or her request for a scholarship; a letter stating Métis Local affiliation; a letter from the post-secondary institution signed by the registrar indicating year of enrollment and discipline of study; letters of reference from the instructors; and additional information the applicant feels is pertinent.

Deadline: Mid-October

Please note: We are trying to update the contact information - the phone and fax numbers listed are not in service.


Nunavut Implementation Training Committee Nunavut Beneficiaries Scholarships

Value: The award for each student in a full-time program will be allocated as follows:
1.Full-time degree program away from home $2,400 per year
2.Full-time diploma away from home $1,500 per year
3.Full-time degree or diploma program at home $1,000 per year

As an integral part of implementing he Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and building Nunavut,several Inuit organizations initiated a scholarship program to encourage Land Claims beneficiaries to pursue advanced education in selected fields related to business, management, resource management, community
development, culture and he social sciences.

The allocation of the scholarships is done on a regional basis based upon he proportion of the beneficiaries and contributions received. If the region does not allocate all seats in that region,unused seats are allocated by the Nunavut Implementation Training Committee on the regional needs basis.

Eligibility: To be eligible for these scholarships,applicants must meet he following criteria: be enrolled as a beneficiary in the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement; be enrolled in (or accepted by)a recognized,full-time, accredited university or college degree or certificate program of at least two years duration; be considered a full-time student in a chosen program; maintain a full course load for the program; have maintained an overall average of 65%in the previous year of academic studies undertaken; and maintain an overall average of 75%while receiving the scholarship.

Deadline: August 1; December 1

Information:
Nunavut Implementation Training Committee
P.O.Box 469
Rankin Inlet, Nunavut X0C 0G0
Phone: (867) 645-2888
Fax: (867) 645-3878


Skookum Jim Trust Fund Education Bursary - Yukon College

Value: Four bursaries of $500.

Eligibility: Four bursaries are awarded based on financial need as
well as good standing. A signature from one of the Admissions staff is required to confirm your standing.

Applicants must: be students of Yukon Aboriginal ancestry; be enrolled as full or part-time students; be enrolled in a developmental studies or pre-employment training/trades; and include a breakdown of personal budget with completed application.(Budget to show total monthly income and monthly expenses.)

Deadline: February 28

Information:
Registrar 's Office
Yukon College
500 College Drive
Whitehorse,Yukon Y1A 5K4
Phone: (867) 668-8710


Chief George Kodakin (Behcho) Environment Scholarship

Award: $1,000 / year (2 awards at $500 each)

Deadline: None.

Eligibility: Student of Dene descent entering or continuing post-secondary education in science, environment or resource management field. Based on satisfactory academic performance, school and community involvement, and financial need.

Information: Phone: (867) 873-4081


Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies/Association
Universitaire Canadienne d'Études Nordiques (ACUNS/AUCEN)

Canadian Northern Studies Trust Awards Program

Award opportunities vary from year to year

Award opportunities are posted to the website in October

Guidelines and applications are available from the website: www.acuns.ca

Only current applications are accepted

Deadline for all applications is January 31

Canadian Northern Studies Trust Awards include:

Canadian Northern Studies Trust Scholarship ($10,000)

Canadian Polar Commission Schoarlship ($10,000)

Research Support Opportunity in Arctic Environmental Studies (In kind  support)

Caribou Research Award ($1,000)

Royal Canadian Geographical Society Studentships in Northern Geography
(Masters $5,0000, PhD $5,000)

Special Bursary for Northern Residents ($2,000)

Northern Resident Scholarship ($10,000)

Information and applications:
Email: awards@acuns.ca
Web Site: www.acuns.ca


 

Canada's Northern Scientific Training Program

Funds are available to Canadian universities with an officially recognized institute or committee for northern studies to help support students. (Priority is given to graduate students.) However, senior undergraduate students entering their final year and intending to undertake an honour's thesis based on northern field work or research which will be continued in subsequent graduate studies are also eligible. Post-doctoral students are not supported.

The program helps pay for transportation and living costs while obtaining practical field work experience in Canada's north, developing interest and expertise on northern issues, and improving research skills.

You are eligible to apply if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident enrolled in a Canadian university and are interested in northern studies with field experience in Canada's north.

For more information, contact: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Northern Scientific Training Program Committee, Sectoral Policy Division
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4

Phone: (819) 997-0660
Fax: (819) 994-6419


Ted Trindell Memorial Scholarship

Presented to Aboriginal students of the Northwest Territories enrolled in full-time studies in the faculty of their choice.

Value: Five scholarships of $1,000.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian of the Northwest Territories.

Good academic standing.

Financial need.

Deadline: March 8th

Information:
Métis Heritage Association Memorial Scholarship Fund
Box 1375
Yellowknife, N.W.T. X1A 2P1
Phone: (867) 873-2878
Fax: (867) 873-3395


Billy Bourque Memorial Scholarship - Métis Nation - Northwest Territories

Description: To assist Métis and Non-Status Indians from the Northwest Territories to pursue studies in aviation.

Value: One scholarship of $5,000

Eligibility: N/A

Duration: N/A

Information:
Métis Heritage Association Memorial Scholarship Fund
Box 1375
Yellowknife, N.W.T. X1A 2P1
Phone: (867) 873-2878
Fax: (867) 873-3395


Memorial Scholarships - Métis Nation - Northwest Territories

To assist Métis and Non-Status Indians from the Northwest Territories to pursue post-secondary education full-time.

Value: Five awards of $1,000 each and one award of $1,500

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.
Academic achievement.
Financial need.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: Varies

Information:
Métis Heritage Association Memorial Scholarship Fund
Box 1375
Yellowknife, N.W.T. X1A 2P1
Phone: (867) 873-2878
Fax: (867) 873-3395

 

Ontario Scholarships

Kathleen Blinkhorn Aboriginal Student Scholarship

The Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association (ONPHA) awards a $1000 scholarship to five Aboriginal students living in non-profit housing, through the Kathleen Blinkhorn Aboriginal Student Scholarship.

I hope you will be able to assist us in promoting this year’s scholarship funds to the eligible students at your institution. I have attached this year’s flyer and would greatly appreciate it if you could post or distribute it at your convenience. You will also find the application form attached, which details eligibility and the application process.

More information about the Kathleen Blinkhorn Scholarship can be found on our website: http://www.onpha.on.ca/onpha/web/

If you would like further details about the scholarship program or application process, please contact Wyndham Bettencourt-McCarthy at Wyndham.bettencourt-mccarthy@onpha.org.

The Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association
400 – 489 College St.
Toronto ON M6G 1A5
T: 416-927-9144, ext. 122
Toll-Free: 1-800-297-6660, ext. 122

 


Hydro One Networks Inc. - The Leonard S. (Tony) Mandamin Scholarship

 

 
Hydro One is a transmission and distribution electricity company in Ontario and is actively engaged in supporting students interested in the electricity sector. Each year, 15 scholarships are available to First Nations, Métis and Inuit students enrolled at a recognized Ontario college or university.
 
Each scholarship includes a financial award in the amount of $5,000.00 and an opportunity to complete a paid developmental work term at Hydro One.
 
The deadline to apply is December 31st of every year.
 
For more information on eligibility, requirements and to apply, please visit: www.HydroOne.com/MandaminScholarship


Four Directions Scholarships Awards

Four scholarships of $1000.00 each will be awarded annually to graduating aboriginal (Status, Non-status, Metis and Inuit) secondary school/adult students. These awards are administered by the Ontario Native Education Counselling Association.

Criteria
- Student of Aboriginal ancestry graduating from an Ontario Secondary School with O.S.S.D of the current school year.
- Good academic standing throughout the school year.
- 75% overall average in graduating year
- Proceeding into a post-secondary institution full time program
- Involvement in the community and/or school extra-curricular activities.
- Recommended by Secondary School, First Nation Community or Education Counsellor.
- Leadership qualities, dedication and good attendance.

Application Procedure

- Application forms are available from a First Nation Education office, and Education Counsellor or from the ONECA office at (705) 692-2999

Applications will only be processed after all of the following has been received.
- Final Transcripts.
- Letter of Recommendation.
- Copy of acceptance letter from post-secondary institution.
- Proof of Aboriginal Ancestry
- Copies of awards, diplomas or other supporting documents.
- Final Report Card.

Deadline:
June 30 @4:00 P.M. each year
Supporting Documents: July 30 each year
 
Ontario Native Education Counselling Association
38 Reserve Road, Box 220,
Naughton, Ontario, P0M 2M0
Email: oneca@oneca.com
Website: www.oneca.com

 

 

 


Randy Anderson Memorial Award - Georgian College

Presented to a full time Design & Visual Arts student of Native Canadian Ancestry who demonstrates commitment to his or her studies and determination and promise in his or her work. Students must visit the awards website for further details and to apply www.georgiancollege.ca/awards

Value: $200

 

Awards Officer
Georgian College
One Georgian Drive
Barrie, Ontario L4M 3X9
Phone: (705) 728-1968 ext. 1211
awards@georgiancollege.ca


Ontario Power Generation - John Wesley Beaver Memorial Award

Two awards are available annually to qualified students – one female and one male – of Native ancestry (Status, Non-status, Métis or Inuit).

Each Award is valued at $4,000.

To apply, students need to be either entering or attending a college or university in Ontario.
To be eligible for an Award, the students must also:

•    Be entering or enrolled in one of the following program areas: Engineering, Trades, Technology, Business, Environmental Studies or disciplines relevant to OPG’s business.
•    Provide proof of good academic standing (minimum B average)
•    Demonstrate strong communication skills
•    Demonstrate involvement in extracurricular activities, including volunteer work
•    Be legally eligible to work in Canada upon graduation
•    Have submitted a completed application form, including a brief (500 words) overview of their interest in their Native community or their commitment to Native culture and heritage.

Applications are due June 1 of each year

For more information please check out OPG’s website at: http://www.mypowercareer.com/Content/Students/StudentAwards/Index.html


General Motors of Canada Brock Scholars Award   

Enbridge Aboriginal Bursary    

Brock donor entrance scholarship applications open January 1 March 31, each year.
 
 
Lily Scappaticci
Scholarships and Awards Assistant
Student Awards and Financial Aid
Brock University
500 Glenridge Ave
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2S 3A1

Ph:     905-688-5550 ext 3028
Fax:    905-688-3051
Web: www.brocku.ca/studentawards

 


Ontario Crafts Council Awards, Scholarships & Supply Grants

The Ontario Crafts Council Awards and Scholarships program is open to Student and Craft Professional members of the Ontario Crafts Council. This year approximately $15,000 is available. All craft disciplines are considered. Awards, scholarships and supply grants will be presented at the Crafts Council's Annual General Meeting in June.

Deadline: Monday, April 17, 5:00 pm.

The Council is delighted to offer two new awards:

Craft Curatorial Award sponsored by Jean Johnson C.M. and  James McPherson Woodworking Award.

Also the supply grants have been significantly increased for this year and the Tommia Vaughan-Jones Award was increased to $1000.

Also new this year - images are now being accepted in digital format but we request that all your images be in the one format - either all slides or all digital.

Applications available from the OCC web site:
www.craft.on.ca/info/member_prog_awards

For more info: communications@craft.on.ca
or call 416-925-4222 x 226


Dennis Cromarty Memorial Fund

Value: Varies

Eligibility: Member of Nishnawbe-Aski First Nation, attending post-secondary insitution, completed 1 year. Commitment to improving quality of life for Native people, independence through education.

Deadline: November 1

Dennis Cromarty Memorial Fund
P.O. Box 252 Station F
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7C 4V8
Phone: (807) 623-5397
Fax: (807) 622-8271


Sam Odjick Scholarship - University of Ottawa

To further the interests of Aboriginal peoples in Canada by assisting Aboriginal law students who have demonstrated commitment toward the advancement of law as it relates to Aboriginal peoples.

Value: $1,000

Eligibility: Preference given to Aboriginal students. Full-time study in the LL.B or LL.M program at the University of Ottawa. Financial need. Good academic performance. Experience with Canadian Aboriginal groups.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: Variable (please contact below).

Information: Education Equity Office
University of Ottawa
Faculty of Law, Common Law Section
57 Louis Pasteur Street
P.O. Box 450, Postal Station A
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5
Phone: (613) 562-5800, ext.3290
Fax: (613) 562-5124


Alma Mater Society Native Student Awards - Queen's University

Established by the Alma Mater Society for Native students entering Queen.s. If no entering students are eligible, the awards could go to upper-year Native students.

Value: Two awards of $1,000 each

Eligibility: Native student entering Queen's. Academic standing. Financial need.

Deadline: April 30 of each year.

Information:
Student Awards Office
Victoria School Building
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6

Phone: (613) 533-2216
Fax: (613) 533-6409

Web: www.queensu.ca/studentawards/index.html

 


Inuit Bursary - Queen's University

Value: One award of $100

Eligibility: Inuit student at Queen's. Financial need.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: December 1 each year.

Information:
Student Awards Office
Victoria School Building
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6

Phone: (613) 533-2216
Fax: (613) 533-6409

Web: www.queensu.ca/studentawards/index.html


Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program

There are approximately 1,300 Scholarships awarded for academic excellence at the graduate level of study at Ontario Universities. The value of awards are $3,953 per acedemic term.

For more information contact:

The Graduate Studies Office
Ontario Universities or
The Ministry of Education and Training
Student Affairs
PO Box 4500
189 Red River Road, 4th Floor
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6G9
Phone: (807)343-7257 or 1-800-465-3957


The Aird Scholarship

Scholarships are intended to help students with physical disabilities study in the first year of a full-time program at a recognized Ontario postsecondary institution. Scholarships are granted each year to 2 applicants who best demonstrate outstanding achievement, motivation and initiative. Value of awards is $2,500.00 each.
For more information contact:

The Ministry of Education and Training
Student Affairs
PO Box 4500
189 Red River Road, 4th Floor
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6G9
Phone: (807)343-7257 or 1-800-465-3957


Suncor Inc. Bursary Fund - University of Waterloo

Suncor Inc. offers bursaries annually to students in Chemical or Mechanical Engineering which, in support of employment equity, will be awarded to women, aboriginal (native) Canadians, persons with disabilities and visible minorities. Interested students should apply on the University of Waterloo general bursary application and attach a letter indicating their eligibility for assistance from this source.

Email: infoucal@www.adm.uwaterloo.ca

 


Aboriginal Postsecondary Bursary - University of Waterloo

 

$1,000 - $3,500

Open to Aboriginal peoples including First Nation, Inuit and Metis peoples.

Deadline: June 30

Forms: safa.uwaterloo.ca/forms/main/Full-timeBursaryApplication09-10.pdf

 


Ontario Power Generation Engineering Award - University of Waterloo

 

Chemical, Computer, Electrical, Environmental, Mechanical, Software Engineering

$2,400

Minimum 75% average. Open to women, aboriginal (native) Canadians, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities. Must demonstrate strong communication and leadership skills, and participate in extracurricular activities. Resume required.

Deadline: July 30

Forms: safa.uwaterloo.ca/forms/main/OPG.pdf


The Indigenous Education Network (IEN) - University of Toronto

 

Deadline: January 15th for the following September term.

The IEN is a self determining organization founded within OISE/UT in 1989 by Aboriginal students. It provides an Aboriginal presence at OISE/UT, and a forum for discussion on issues relating to Aboriginal education and research.

Aboriginal Scholarships

As an Aboriginal student (including Métis, Inuit, and Native) you are eligible to apply for the Aboriginal Scholarship of $11,500. Application forms are available by contacting the Financial Awards officer (Margaret Brennan) in the Graduate Studies office at:

Phone: (416) 923-6641 ext. 2650


Other Sources of Financial Support - University of Toronto

Deadline: Jan. 15th for the following September term.

Aboriginal students are encouraged to apply for Graduate Assistant positions at OISE/UT. These are part-time paid work positions generating approximately $8,000. per year. Application forms come with first-time enrollment packages or by contacting Margaret Brennan in Graduate Studies at OISE/UT. (416) 978-6641 ext. 2650.

There are other scholarships, bursaries, and awards you may be eligible toreceive. For further information:

Phone: (416) 923-6641 ext. 2286 (voicemail)
Fax: (416) 926-4749
E-mail: ien@oise.utoronto.ca

Web: www.oise.utoronto.ca/other/ien/ienpage.html

The Indigenous Education Network
Rm. 7-191 7th Floor 252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario



Saskatchewan Scholarships


AltaLink Aboriginal Scholarship Program

In 2007, AltaLink launched its aboriginal scholarship program. This scholarship program is designed to recognize the aboriginal community and offer financial assistance to aboriginal students attending post-secondary institutions by offering four $2,000 scholarships.

ELIGIBILITY:
This scholarship is open to all students who are Métis or members of Treaty 6, 7 or 8 and are currently enrolled in a post secondary institution.

HOW TO ENTER:
Applicants can enter one of two ways, online or by mail.
All applications must be received in full by November 30.

Online application
To apply online, applicants must fill out the online form please click here.

In addition to this application form, applicants must arrange to have a copy of their official transcripts sent to:
ATTN: Megan Wolfinger
AltaLink
2611 3rd Ave SE
Calgary AB, T2A 7W7

Mail application
To apply by mail, applicants must print off and fill out the scholarship application form from at this link. The form must then be mailed to Megan Wolfinger at AltaLink.

In addition to this application form, applicants must arrange to have a copy of their official transcripts sent to:
ATTN: Megan Wolfinger
AltaLink
2611 3rd Ave SE
Calgary AB, T2A 7W7

Official transcripts must be requested by you directly from your post-secondary institutions. Only official transcripts received directly from your post-secondary institution that are received no later than November 30, 2010 will be accepted. Only once we receive an application form and transcripts will an application be complete and considered eligible.

AltaLink will not be held liable for late, lost, delayed, not received, damaged, misdirected, incomplete, stolen, fraudulent, or illegible applications.

SCHOLARSHIPS:
A scholarships valued at $2,000 will be awarded to a student from each of Treaty 6, 7, 8 and Métis.

SCHOLARSHIP SELECTION:
Recipients will be selected in January of 2011 and will be directly notified. Only successful applicants will be notified.

Students will be selected for the awards based on financial need, scholastic achievement, community involvement and career and life goals.
Be sure to complete all the required questions and provide your official transcripts to us. A complete application will increase your chances of selection.

PRIVACY:
The information you are providing to AltaLink is being collected for the purpose of choosing a scholarship recipient. AltaLink will not rent or sell your personal information to any third party.

Information held by AltaLink will be protected in accordance with AltaLink's privacy policies. If you have any questions, please contact Megan Wolfinger at (403) 267-4292.

Application deadline is November 30, 2010.


Gabriel Dumont Institute - Métis Health and Wellness Scholarship

The Gabriel Dumont Institute, in partnership with the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan and the Métis National Council, is pleased to offer a unique funding opportunity for Métis students entering into, or already involved in, health related studies.

Applicants must be Métis, a Saskatchewan resident for at least one year, provide proof of acceptance to Dumont Technical Institute, Gabriel Dumont College, University of Saskatchewan, University of Regina, SIAST, or a regional college, meet academic qualifications and include letters of support from a Métis community member and personal reference. Selected applicants will also have future plans to work with Métis, display elements of community involvement and leadership as well as a participation in Métis culture.

The application form is available on the Gabriel Dumont Institute website at: www.gdins.org.

For more information, please contact:

Jason (J.J.) Johnston, Coordinator
Métis Health and Wellness Scholarship Program
219 Robin Crescent
Saskatoon, SK S7L 6M8
Ph: 306-934-5927 Fax: 306-934-5928
Email: jason.johnston@gdi.gdins.org


Jake Mike Memorial Scholarship Fund

Established by the children of the late Jacob G. Mike to assist students from any of the Saskatchewan First Nations who are pursuing a Degree or Diploma (minimum 2 years in length) from a post-secondary institution in Saskatchewan, and who are in their 1st year of studies.

Number of Scholarships: (4) at $500 each

Deadline date: June 30th

Scholarship selection date: July 15th

Eligibility: Enrolled in their post-secondary program of choice beginning Fall 2005, and have successfully completed their first year of full-time studies ending Spring 2006.
Must be a member of a Saskatchewan First Nation.

For application forms and/or more information:
Jake Mike Memorial Scholarship
c/o 234 Fisher Crescent
Saskatoon SK S7L 5C9

Email: distant.thunder1@hotmail.com

Selected applicants will be contacted first via telephone and then by mail.
A copy of proof of status, i.e. Treaty card, will be required prior to disbursement.
Be sure to inform us if your phone number or address changes. Thank you.


Morley Wood Memorial Scholarship for Aboriginal Female Students - University of Regina

To promote entry or advancement in a chosen program of studies at the University of Regina, the University of Saskatchewan or other post-secondary institutions in Saskatchewan with recognized professional standing.

Value: Two scholarships of $600 each.

Eligibility: The contribution made by the individual in promoting Aboriginal women, financial need and academic standing are taken into consideration as follows:
. The applicant.s contribution in promoting Aboriginal women will be assessed. The Scholarship.s Review committee will look specifically at the individual's contribution in community-based or regional Aboriginal projects or programs which support the literacy, awareness or development of the economic independence of Aboriginal women. Information on the
applicant.s contribution in promoting Aboriginal women must be provided with the application.
. The program of studies being followed must enhance the professional skills of the applicant to promote further development in the Aboriginal community, specifically for Aboriginal women.
. Financial need.
. A minimum weighted average of 70%.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: July 31 each year

University of Regina, Student Awards & Financial Aid
University of Saskatchewan
First Nations University of Canada
Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies & Applied Research
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science & Technology (SIAST)
Saskatchewan regional and community colleges with recognized professional standing.


FSIN Senator Hilliard McNab CM Memorial Foundation and Scholarship Fund

Application deadline: Postmarked no later than July 31.

The Senator Hilliard McNab Foundation and Scholarship Fund was established after the death of Senator McNab, in commemoration of his interest in education and in young people.

Senator McNab was born on the Gordon Reserve in 1916, married the former Doris Anderson and raised his family on the Reserve. He served on the Council for over 32 years, 16 of those as Chief. He was a founding member of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, a charter member of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission, and was instrumental in achieving the legislation that permitted Indian people to represent their bands on Provincial School Division Boards. He was awarded the Order of Canada for his work in all these areas and for the respect he won from politicians of all philosophies.

1. Award: $1,000.
2. Available to Treaty Indian Members of Saskatchewan Bands who have successfully completed two years or more of University, or comparable program, and are registered to continue. Students are eligible once during undergraduate and twice during graduate studies.
3. Complete transcript of post-secondary marks must accompany the letter of application.
4. Letter of application should include your Treaty number, band, a brief biography with some of your interests and activities, as well as a list of the subjects you are registering for in your next semester and confirmation of your intention to continue.
Mail your completed application to:

FSIN Senator Hilliard McNab CM
Memorial Foundation and Scholarship Fund
c/o Mrs. Irene Walter
Box 385
Punnichy, SK S0A 3C0

For more information contact Helen McNab at 835-2770
or Mrs. Walter at 835-2285


SaskPower Diversity Awards Program

Award description: There are two awards categories:

Entrance: up to seven awards will be presented in each academic year for students entering first-year studies.

Continuing: up to eight awards will be presented in each academic year for students entering second-year studies and beyond.

Award value is $1,500

Application deadline: No later than September 30.

Awards are presented on a one-time only basis and recipients may only receive one SaskPower post-secondary award during their studies.

Eligibility: To be eligible for a SaskPower Diversity Award, a student must:

* Be from one of the four designated/targeted groups as defined by Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission.

* Be enrolled in a full-time certificate, diploma or degree program at an accredited post-secondary institution in Saskatchewan with preference given to programs related to the electrical industry which may include, but are not limited to, engineering, trades, technology and business programs.

* Be a Saskatchewan resident. (You are considered a Saskatchewan resident if any one of the following is true: you have always lived in Saskatchewan; you or your spouse filed a Saskatchewan income tax return for the last tax year; or, your parents filed a Saskatchewan tax return for the last tax year.)

Definitions of Diversity Groups: Eligible students must be from one of the four designated/targeted groups as defined by Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission. Summaries of these are:

* Aboriginal people  For equity purposes, Aboriginal people are those who identify themselves as First Nations, Metis or Inuit.
* Visible minorities  This includes non-Aboriginal people of colour. Members of visible minorities may, for example, be persons of African, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Pacific Islande, East Asian, West Asian, Arab or Latin American ancestry.
* Persons with disabilities  For equity purposes, persons with disabilities:
o a) have persistent physical, intellectual, mental, psychiatric, sensory or learning conditions that require a technical device and/or personal support or services which enable such persons to perform the essential functions of a job;
o b) require some form of accommodation such as extra rest breaks or time off/leave to obtain treatment as necessary, or modifications to the job responsibility, job site or work hours;
o and c) consider themselves, and believe an employer or potential employer would consider them, disadvantaged in finding, retaining or advancing in employment because of that condition.
* Women in under-represented occupations  This includes women entering a field of employment where positions held by women total less than 45 per cent.

Criteria for Selection: Award applicants will be evaluated based on:

* academic achievement;
* leadership qualities; and
* balanced lifestyle (i.e. community involvement, participation in extra-curricular activities).

Although students are eligible to apply for the SaskPower Diversity Awards Program and the SaskPower Scholarship Program, the same student cannot receive both awards.

Incomplete applications will NOT be considered.

Application forms are available from SaskPower on-line at www.saskpower.com/awards


Weyerhaeuser Canada, Saskatchewan Division - Educational Awards Program

Number: Four, annually

Value:
$2,500 for University
$1,200 for Technical

Deadline: June 30

Eligibility: Applicant must be enrolled in a university or technical institute program that is relevant to Weyerhaeuser's Saskatchewan businesses, including but not limited to:
Forestry
Engineering
Accounting
Computer Science

Preference is given to individuals of Aboriginal ancestry, women in non-traditional roles, disabled persons and members of visible minorities.

Education Awards Program, Weyerhaeuser Canada
Saskatchewan Division
P.O. Box 1900
Prince Albert, Saskatchewan S6V 6J9

Fax: (306) 922-1371


SaskEnergy Aboriginal Scholarships

In support of Saskatchewan Aboriginal youth, SaskEnergy provides 14 post-secondary scholarships each year.

Students must attend Saskatchewan Indian federated College (SIFC), Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT), Gabriel Dumont Institute and Dumont Technical Institute.

Value: Varies from $1000 to $5,000

Eligibility: Aboriginal; Saskatchewan resident; Saskatchewan high school graduate; achieve 80% average in grades 11 and 12; demonstrate financial need; register full-time for the fall or winter semesters.

Phone: (306) 777-9079

Contact each institution for application forms.


City of Regina - Henry Baker Scholarships

The City of Regina offers nine scholarships to students at the University of Regina including two at FNUiv in Regina

Value: 6 @ $1000 and 3 @ $2,000

Eligibility: Varies

Deadline: May 31st

Information:
Phone: (306) 777-7000

Application form: www.regina.ca

Return completed application to:
City of Regina
Henry Baker Scholarship Program
PO Box 1790
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3C8


Fraser Scholarship - Moose Jaw School Division

To encourage an Aboriginal student from Moose Jaw Public School Division to pursue studies at a recognized post-secondary institution.

Value: Approximately $400

Eligibility: Native ancestry

Graduated from Moose Jaw Public School Division.
Entering first year at a recognized post-secondary institution.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 1 each year

Information:
Moose Jaw Public School Division
1075 9th Avenue NW
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan S6H 4J6
Phone: (306) 693-4631
Fax: (306) 694-4686


Eugene Lavallee Memorial Scholarship

Deadline: June 15

One valued at $500

Awarded in preference to First Nations students whose home community is in the Touchwood File Hills Qu'Appelle area. Subsequent preference will be given to First Nations students from Saskatchewan.

Award based on highest average marks and then based on experience in the field of addictions. In the event of two or more students having similar marks the scholarship will be awarded based on experience.

No student may be receive this scholarship two years consecutively.

Apply to:
Judie J. Birns, Executive Director
New Dawn Valley Centre
Box 400
Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan S0G 1S0


Cameco Northern Scholarship

Deadline June 30

Scholarships of up to $4,000 for university degree programs, up to $3,600 for technoical training at a recognized technical institute is available. Eligible individuals must have resided in the Northern Admninistration District of Saskatchewan for five (5) years immediately prior to application. Special consideration will be given to applicants pursuing careers related to some aspect of the mining industry.

Application forms are available from individual schools or Cameco's Norther Affairs office:

Cameco
Northern Affairs,
P.O. Box 1049,
LaRonge, Saskatchewan S0J 1L0


Cameco Scholarship

Deadline June 30

Several scholarships of $1,000 are provided annually to selected dependent children of regular Cameco employees, in recognition of the superior academic performance.

Manager, Compensation and Benefits,
Human Resources and Administration Division,
Cameco Corporation,
2121 11th Street West,
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7M 1J3.


SaskTel Scholarships and Bursaries

SaskTel Scholarship:

Every year, SaskTel awards eleven scholarships of $3,000 to post-secondary students in Saskatchewan. To be eligible, you must be a Saskatchewan resident; be enrolled in full-time studies related to telecommunications at a post-secondary education institution in Saskatchewan; have achieved a minimum average. SaskTel encourages students from employment equity groups to apply; however, scholarships are not limited to equity candidates.

Deadline to apply is September 15.

SaskTel and Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) Scholarship:
The Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) and SaskTel jointly established six scholarships valued at $1500 to encourage Aboriginal students to pursue post-secondary education in fields directly related to telecommunications. There is an Entrance Scholarship for students who have successfully completed High School requirements or the Adult Secondary Education program and a Continuing Scholarship for students who successfully complete the first year of study of a two year diploma program. Check sasktel.com for all eligibility details.

Deadline to apply is November 1.

Visit www.sasktel.com/about-us for more information and to apply on-line.


Areva Resources Inc. Scholarships:

Deadline: June 30

Ten (10) $3,500 University and
Five (5) $4,000 Technical

Available annually to Northern Saskatchewan residents for courses of study of future benefit to the north.

Information and application forms:
Manager, Northern Affairs
Cogema Resources Inc.
P.O. Box 900, La Ronge, Saskatchewan S0J 1L0
Phone: (306) 425-6880
Fax: (306) 425-6886


Margaret M. Aikenhead Scholarship in Nursing:

An annual $500 award presented to a former resident and grade XII graduate,within the last seven years, from the Melfort Union Hospital Administrative area. As well, the successful completion of at least the 1st year and enrolled in at least the 2nd year of the Diploma Nursing program or enrolled in the 4th, or 5th of the Degree Program in a recognized School of Nursing. Further information and application forms available by contacting:

Executive Director,
Melfort Union Hospital,
Box 1480,
Melfort, Saskatchewan S0E 1A0


Northern Spirit Scholarship Program:

Deadline: June 30

Ten (10) $2,500 institute/university scholarships are available to permanent residents of Northern Saskatchewan applying or enrolled in a full-time program. Applicants must have a "B" academic average in most recent year completed and be enrolled in a program of benefit to Northern development.

Applications are available from and submitted by June 30

Northern Spirit Scholarship Program,
Northern Enterprise Fund Inc.
Box 220,
Beauval, Saskatchewan S0M 0G0
Email: nefi@sasktel.net
Toll Free: 1-800-864-3022
Phone: (306) 288-2258
Fax: (306) 288-4667



Napolean Lafontaine Scholarship Trust:

To encourage Saskatchewan Indian people to pursue full-time education training in fields related to the economic development of Aboriginal peoples.

The economic studies must contribute to:
. Entrepreneurial skills
. Administrative and management skills in both the private and public sectors
. Financial analysis
. Communication skills
. Organization and leadership
. Human resource development training.

Eligible academic disciplines include:
. Business administration
. Commerce
. Economics
. Marketing
. Personnel management
. Retail management
. Office administration
. Law
. Accountancy
. Political economy.

Entrance Scholarships

Value: Up to $300 for each eight-month period of full-time studies. The number of scholarships and amount depend on the number of applicants in
relation to the funds available.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.

Has resided in Saskatchewan for at least five years.
Enrolled in, or about to enroll in a diploma or certificate program from a recognized Canadian public or Aboriginal educational institution. The program must be at least eight months of full-time studies in an area related to economic development. Students who have not completed high school may apply if they have fulfilled the entrance requirements of the institution where they will be studying. Committed to working in an Aboriginal work environment on successful completion of his or her studies. Demonstrate a commitment to the needs of Aboriginal peoples. Achieve a B average in the most recent months of full-time studies, over a period of
12 consecutive months.

Duration: Annual.

Application Deadline: October 1 and May 1 each year.


 

Gabriel Dumont Graduation Scholarships

Value: Up to $200 for each year of full-time studies to a maximum of $1,000 for any one recipient.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.
Has resided in Saskatchewan for at least five years.
Completed a diploma, certificate or degree program at the Gabriel Dumont Institute which required a minimum of eight months of full-time study.
Enrolled in a public or Aboriginal education institution in Canada providing a recognized diploma, certificate or degree program. Nominated by Institute staff based on academic achievement, contribution to the student body and commitment to Aboriginal peoples. Achieve a B average in the most recent months of full-time studies.

Duration: N/A.
Application Deadline: Application not required.

 


Graduate Scholarships

Value: Up to $2,000 for each award period, granted on the basis of 12 consecutive months
of full-time studies.
The number of scholarships and the amount are determined by the number of applicants in relation to the available funds.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.
Has resided in Saskatchewan for at least five years.
Engaged in any graduate degree program at the masters or doctoral level or accepted into a masters or doctoral program at a recognized Canadian university. The major
research project or thesis must relate to the economic development of Aboriginal peoples. Committed to working in an Aboriginal work environment on successful completion of studies.
Demonstrate a commitment to the needs of Aboriginal peoples. Achieve a B average in the most recent months of full-time studies, over a period of 12 consecutive months.

Duration: Annual.
Masters applicants may receive two consecutive or non-consecutive awards. Doctoral applicants may receive three consecutive or non-consecutive awards.

Application Deadline: October 1 and May 1 each year.

 


Loan Remission Scholarships

Value: Not to exceed 50% of the outstanding loan balance to a maximum of $3,000. Will not be paid before the date on which interest on the outstanding loan becomes payable.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.
Has resided in Saskatchewan for at least five years.
Has an outstanding loan balance through the Canada Student Loan Program and/or Saskatchewan Student Loan Program after the receipt of any other loan remission awards available to the applicant through the governments of Canada and Saskatchewan.

Duration: N/A

Application Deadline: October 1 and May 1 each year.

 


Special Scholarships

Value: Varies depending on whether funds designated for other scholarships have been used or unanticipated revenues received.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.
Has resided in Saskatchewan for at least five years.
Enrolled in a public or Aboriginal educational institution in Canada providing a recognized diploma, certificate or degree program. Committed to the needs of Aboriginal people. Achieve a B average in the most recent eight months of full-time studies, over a period of 12 consecutive months.

Duration: N/A.
Application Deadline: Recipients may not be required to submit an application.


Undergraduate Scholarships

Value: Up to $500 for each eight-month period of full-time studies. Number of scholarships and amount determined by the number of applicants in relation to the funds available. An individual may receive up to three consecutive or non-consecutive undergraduate
scholarship awards.

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indian.
Has resided in Saskatchewan for at least five years.
Completed a minimum of one academic year of full-time studies at a recognized Canadian public or Aboriginal educational institution. The program must be at least
eight months of full-time studies in an area related to economic development. Committed to the needs of Aboriginal peoples. Committed to working in an Aboriginal work environment on successful completion
of studies. Achieve a B average in the most recent eight months of full-time studies, over a
period of 12 consecutive months.

Duration: Annual

Application Deadline: October 1 and May 1 each year.

Information:
Napolean Lafontaine Scholarship Fund
Room 210 College West building
University of Regina
3737 Wescana Parkway
Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2
Phone: (306) 347-4100
Fax: (306) 565-0809


Delta Catalytic Scholarship

Deadline: June 30

One (1) $2,000 University and
Two (2) $1,000 Technical

are available annually to Northern Saskatchewan residents willing to return to Northern Saskatchewan to practice or work. Send transcripts to Cogema Resources Inc. Must be a program of benefit to the north.

Manager, Northern Affairs
Cogema Resources Inc.
P.O. Box 900, La Ronge SK S0J 1L0


Bill Hanson Bursary/Scholarship Program
Sponsored by: Treeline Association of I.A.N.E.

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry student enrolled in post-secondary or Adult Basic Education who has indicated a preference in commerce, bookkeeping, receptionist/secretarial, clerical accounting, business administration, accounting, or data entry

Value: Two at $150

Criteria: Have demonstrated proficiency in academics, involvement with extra-curricular activities and community volunteer organizations, leadership qualities, proven dedication and perseverance in overcoming educational barriers, intent on continuing studies at a recognized university or technical institute for the next academic year.

Deadline: May

Applications available from:
Vicki Drieger
Royal Bank
1135 Central Avenue
Prince Albert, SK

Fax: (306) 953-5766


Saskatchewan Gaming Corporation Post-secondary Scholarships

Eligibility: Saskatchewan resident who is enrolled or about to be enrolled in full-time studies at a post-secondary education institute in Saskatchewan and must be taking a program related to the following: recreational and leisure studies; business administration; hospitality management; electronics and computer technologies; or communications.

Value: Six (6) $1000 scholarships for university degree programs; Eight $500 scholarships for certificate/diploma programs

Criteria: Selection criteria includes: education and career focus; academic standing; commitments to work, education, family and community; and financial need.

Deadline Date: May 31

Applications submitted to:
Saskatchewan Gaming
Scholarship Committee 3rd Floor,
1880 Saskatchewan Drive
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 0B2


Donald R. Simmons Memorial Scholarship
Eligibility: Indian or Metis ancestry

Value: Two $500 awards

Criteria: Enrolled in first year of approved institution, Grade 12 graduate; General Proficiency Award applicants excluded

Deadline Date: October 15

Applications submitted to: Saskatchewan Education, Training and Employment

Student Financial Assistance Unit
Ground Floor, East Wing,
Walter Scott Building
305 Albert Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3V7


Gabriel Dumont Award
To assist Aboriginal students enrolled at the Kelsey Institute in furthering their education. One award is designated to each of the following divisions:

. Adult Basic Education (ABE)
. Industrial Engineering
. Health, Science and Community Services

Value: Three awards of $250 each

Eligibility: Aboriginal student enrolled in a full-time, on-campus program at Kelsey Campus. Academic achievement. Involvement in student life activities.
Participation in and contribution to the community.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: May 31 each year for ABE.

February 28 each year for Industrial Engineering and Health, Science andCommunity Services.

Information:
Director, Student Awards
SIAST Kelsey Institute
P.O. Box 1520
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 3R5

Scholarship Listings by School

Algoma University

Algoma University

Algoma University distributes over $400,000 in bursaries and scholarships each year to qualified students through the Financial Aid and Awards Office. Financial assistance is available to students from a variety of sources and is based on demonstrated unmet need as well as academic standing.

Scholarships are based primarily on academic merit.

Bursaries are based on some combination of financial need and academic standing.

An annual grant provides one scholarship of $2,000 to a dependent of a municipal employee who enrols in Algoma U for full-time (30 credits) studies. The candidate must have completed his or her qualifying requirements in the academic year prior to commencing studies at Algoma U, and must present an average of at least 80% on the 6 best U or M courses presented for admission. This scholarship is non-cumulative with the Algoma U Awards of Excellence, Edward & Frank McGrath Award, Carl J. Sanders, Peggy & Willmont MacDonnell, City of Sault Ste. Marie Admission Scholarships, Algoma U Achievement Scholarships, and the John R. Rhodes Scholarship.


John R. Rhodes Scholarship

Number of Awards: 1

Amount:$3000
Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: June 30
Renewable: Yes

The John R. Rhodes Scholarship was established in 1979 through generous donations from friends and family of the late John Rhodes. This scholarship, of $3,000 annually is offered to students entering their first year of university studies from secondary school who have demonstrated academic achievement and community leadership while involved in political, social, or academic activities. This scholarship is renewable for up to three additional years. The recipient must have completed all his or her qualifying requirements in the academic year prior to registering at Algoma U, and must enrol in 30 credits over 2 consecutive terms of study. To carry the scholarship in subsequent years, the recipient must maintain a minimum average of 80% each academic year on 30 credits taken in two consecutive terms. The John R. Rhodes scholarship is non-cumulative with the Algoma U Awards of Excellence, Edward & Frank McGrath Award, Carl J. Sanders, Peggy & Willmont MacDonnell, City of Sault Ste. Marie Admission Scholarships, and the Algoma U Achievement Scholarships.


Algoma University Alumni Entrance Award I

Number of Awards: 1
Amount:$2000
Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: June 30
Renewable: Yes

A scholarship of up to $2,000 is given to the child of an Algoma U alumni with the highest average on the 6 best U or M courses presented for admission. Application required.


Algoma University Alumni Entrance Award II

Number of Awards: 1
Amount:$2000
Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: June 30
Renewable: Yes

A scholarship of up to $2,000 is given to a mature student, now enrolled in the first year of full time studies, who has been away from formal education for at least 5 years.


Algoma University Alumni Entrance Award III

Number of Awards: 1
Amount:$2000
Application Required?: No
Deadline: N/A
Renewable: Yes

A scholarship of up to $2,000 is given to a student transferring to Algoma U under a college articulation agreement who has the highest GPA in the last full year of their college program.


Algoma University Alumni Entrance Award IV

Number of Awards

: 1
Amount
:$2000
Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: June 30
Renewable: No


The Robert Belair Memorial Fund

Number of Awards

: 1
Amount
:$1000
Application Required?: No
Deadline: N/A
Renewable: Yes

St Marys Paper and its employees have established two scholarships in memory of Algoma U alumnus the late Robert Belair, an employee of St Marys Paper. One award of $1,000 is given to the student entering the first year of studies in the BBA program with the highest average on the 6 best U or M courses presented for admission.


Métis Nation of Ontario Bursary Award

Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: April 30

Recipients of the awards shall be members of the Métis Community within the meaning of the Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO) as described in the 1997/98 Regional Bilateral Agreement executed by Human Resources Development Canada and the MNO on the 27th of November 1996. Applicants must show financial need and be in good academic standing. Endowed.


Anishinaabe Students Assistance Fund

Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: April 30

This endowed fund provides bursary awards of up to $500 to Anishinaabe (First Nation, Métis, or Inuit) students in good academic standing with demonstrated financial need. Endowed.


Shingwauk Anishinaabe Student Association International Scholarship

The Shingwauk Anishinaabe Student Association International Scholarship provides one annual award of $600 to an international student in the 2nd year of full-time studies at Algoma University with the highest average overall. Endowed.

Number of Awards: 1
Amount:$600
Application Required?: Yes
Deadline: April 30


Algoma University
1520 Queen Street East
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 2G4

Inquire: awards@algomau.ca

Main Phone: 705-949-2301
Toll Free: 1-888-ALGOMA-U (1-888-254-6628)
Fax: 705-949-6583
www.algomau.ca

 

Brandon University

Scholarships offered by Brandon University

Ms Janet Omstead Wood
Senate Awards Office
Brandon University
270 - 18th Street
Brandon, MB R7A 6A9

Phone: (204) 727-9737
Fax: (204) 727-4072
Email: wood@brandonu.ca


Louis Riel Scholarships at Brandon University

Are awarded to entering or returning students of Brandon University who are Manitoba residents of Métis status and who demonstrate strong academic potential. As part of their application, applicants must provide a letter stating they are either members of the Manitoba Métis Federation or are eligible for membership in the Manitoba Métis Federation.

Applicants who are offered a scholarship must register as full-time students at Brandon University. Students may appeal to defer taking up the award for up to 12 months upon written request to the Scholarship Committee. Students may apply and be considered for this award more than once. Scholarship holders must achieve satisfactory academic progress at Brandon University. A minimum cumulative g.p.a. of 2.5 (letter grade C+) is required to receive the award. Funds from these scholarships are disbursed in two installments, the first half normally in September and the second half in January. Retention of the second installment is conditional upon the recipient's maintenance of a satisfactory academic performance (C+ cumulative average).

Value: Up to 6 awards per year, value $1500 each.


Xerox Canada Award - Brandon University

Value: $2450

To be awarded to a Native Canadian student who has registered in a Business Administration course(s) during Regular Session. The recipient may either be an entering or returning student.

Deadline: May 11th annually.


Isabelle Douglas Estate Scholarships - Brandon University

Value: 4 x $310

To be awarded to a Second or Third Year student proceeding into Third or Fourth Year studies in any degree program at Brandon University being taken on or off campus. Eligible students must be all or part Manitoba Indian ancestry.

Deadline: May 11th annually.


MTS Bursaries for Aboriginal Students - Brandon University

To be awarded to Aboriginal students taking courses in Computer Science or Business Administration. In the event that there are no qualified applicants in these areas, the award will be granted to an Aboriginal student in a Science program.

Deadline: May 11th beginning in 2002.


Donna and Bill Parrish Scholarship for Aboriginal Students - Brandon University

To be awarded to an Aboriginal student of strong academic merit enrolled in full-time study at Brandon University.

Deadline is May 11th, beginning in 2002.


Dr. Wilfred W. McCutcheon Scholarship in Education (Aboriginal Student) - Brandon University

Value: $1,000

This scholarship is to be awarded, upon application, to an Aboriginal student in the Faculty of Education who is entering the final year of a Bachelor of Education (A.D.) and who demonstrates a combination of outstanding academic achievement, excellence in leadership ability on campus or in the community, and professional promise in classroom teaching. The student must have a minimum 3.5 g.p.a. in the pre-award year and provide two letters of recommendation from the Dean and/or members of the Faculty of Education.

Deadline: May 11th annually.


John & Kay Findlay Scholarship in Native Studies - Brandon University

Value: $900

Awarded to a Canadian First Nations or Metis student proceeding to Third or Fourth Year who has or will have satisfied at least the requirement for a minor in Native Studies at Brandon University.

Deadline: May 11th annually.

Ms Janet Omstead Wood
Senate Awards Office
Brandon University
270 - 18th Street
Brandon, MB R7A 6A9

Phone: (204) 727-9737
Fax: (204) 727-4072
Email: wood@brandonu.ca

Camosun College

Camosun College - Victoria, BC

The Dorothy Price Treasure Box

The Tsa Qwa Supp Award for Nuu-cha-nulth Students

Saanich Indian School Board/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award

The Saanich Indian School Board Award for Camosun College Students

Cowichan Trading Company Award

The Allen and Loreen Vandekerkhove Family Foundation Bursary for First Nations Health and Human Services Students

The Songhees Nation/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award

The Eulau Howard Memorial Award for Camosun College First Nations Students

The Victoria Native Friendship Centre/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award

The Winona Wood Award for First Nations Women

Please send or drop off completed applications to:
First Nations Education and Services,
Ewing Building, Room 272
Camosun College,
3100 Foul Bay Road,
Victoria, BC V8P 5J2

Phone (250) 370-3299
Fax (250) 370-3291



The Dorothy Price Treasure Box
Awards for First Nations Students at Camosun College

Mrs. Dorothy Price, who lived in Victoria, recognized the needs of Aboriginal people who are seeking education to benefit their lives and their communities. In 1997 at her passing, she left a very generous gift to Camosun College to support Aboriginal students.

In many First Nations traditions there is a Treasure Box of precious gifts. To honour Mrs. Price's wishes, Camosun College has developed the Dorothy Price Treasure Box of Awards for First Nations students. The awards that have been established recognize the four parts of human beings: the intellectual; the physical; the spiritual; and the emotional.

Intellectual:
First Nations Studies Achievement Award:

Award presented to the highest achieving student in a First Nations program at Camosun College. Only those students considered full-time by Camosun College are eligible. Students do not apply for this award. Recipients will be chosen based on Grade Point Average in an academic year in a First Nations-specific program.

Yaay'us ("Working" in Hul'qumi'num') Award:

Provides tuition for a First Nations student to take a short-term career-enhancement program or course at Camosun College. Students may apply for this award throughout the year through the First Nations Education and Services office.

 
Physical:
Mino-Ayaa ("Being Well" in Ojibwe) Wellness Award

Award presented to a First Nations students who has achieved or demonstrated exceptional commitment to physical well-being. Students apply for this award through the First Nations Education and Services office.

Application deadline is January 21.

Spiritual:
Treasure Box Award in Memory of James Dick

Award presented to a First Nations student who has demonstrated an exceptional commitment to culture and community contribution. Students apply for this award through the First Nations Education and Services office.

Application deadline is January 21.

Emotional:
Sheli/ten ("Spirit of Mother" in Lekwungen) Award

Emergency assistance for students facing unforeseen circumstances that may seriously impact their success in education. The First Nations Education and Services office will determine recipients.

Deld'alus TE Ten ("The Arms of Mother" in Sencoten) Award

Award to provide assistance to First Nations students who both study and have primary parental responsibilities. Students apply for this award through the First Nations Education and Services office.

Application deadline is January 21.

The Dorothy Price Treasure Box of Awards is jointly administered through the Camosun College First Nations Education and Services office and the College Foundation. Recipients must attend Camosun College.


The Tsa Qwa Supp Award for Nuu-cha-nulth Students

The purpose of the Tsa Qwa Supp Award is to encourage and provide financial support to Nuu-cha-nulth students who are pursuing professional careers and are studying at Camosun College. The scholarship was developed in 1999 and was a gift from Tsa Qwa Supp (Art Thompson) and BC Hydro. We honour Tsa Qwa Supp's memory and generosity.

Deadline is April 15

The award comes from proceeds of the sale of a limited-edition serigraph of the Tate family curtain which served as a centerpiece to the Out of the Mist Huupukwanum-Tupaat: Treasures of the Nuu-chah-nulth Chiefs exhibit at the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria. Tsa Qwa Supp was commissioned to re-create the Tate family curtain and render the design of the serigraph. BC Hydro financed the commission and the production of the prints.

The fund is managed by the Camosun College Foundation and disbursement of awards is administered through the Camosun College First Nations Education and Services office. Recipients are expected to attend an awards ceremony in Victoria.

Criteriua
1. Applicants must be full-time Camosun College students who have completed at least two full terms of post-secondary study with a GPA of at least 3.0;
2. Applicants must attach a record of grades or transcript from the previous two semesters;
3. Applicants must be attached by ancestry and identity to the Nuu-cha-nulth Nation, including the Ahousaht, Ehattesaht, Hupacasath, Ka:'yu:'k't'h'/Che:k'tles7et'h', Mowachuht/Muchalaht, Huu-ay-aht, Tla-o-qui-aht, Toquaht, Ucluelet, Ditidaht, Hesquiaht, Nuchatlaht, Tseshaht, Uchucklesath, Pacheedaht and Makah Tribes;
4. Applicants must include a short (250-300 word) essay discussing their goals an daspirations, their reasons for applying for this award, and their ties with the Nuu-chah-nulth people;
5. Applicants must include a letter of reference from a community member, instructor, advisor, or employers. Letters should not be from immediate family members;
6. Only completed applications will be considered.

The TSA QWA SUPP Award is awarded annually in amounts of not less than $500.


Saanich Indian School Board/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award

The Saanich Indian School Board/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award was made on the occasion of the ceremonial re-signing of the Affiliation Agreement, January 24, 2006. The purpose of the award is to encourage Saanich students who are working towards strong achievement in their studies, and to consider their future contributions to their community.

Deadline is April 21

The bursary will be awarded to (one) student from the Tsawout, Tsartlip, Pauquachin or Tseycum Nations who has demonstrated commitment to Community, Leadership and Volunteer work. Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony at which the Songhees Nation/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award will be presented.

Criteria
1. Applicants must be enrolled as full-time Camosun College; and
2. Applications must a member of the WSANEC Nation (Tsawout, Tsartlip, Pauquachin or Tseycum); and
3. Applicants must have a satisfactory record of achievement in the past academic year; and
4. Applicants must provide permission for the First Nations Education and Services office to check their Fall and Winter semester grades; and
5. Applicants must write a letter that describes their work or involvement in community leadership roles, activities, and volunteer experience; and
6. Applicants must include a letter of reference from a community member (non-family) or a teacher; and
7. Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony at which the Saanich Indian School Board/Camosun College Affiliation Award will be presented; and
8. Only complete applications will be considered.


The Saanich Indian School Board Award for Camosun College Students

The award is meant to encourage students who are funded by the Saanich Indian School Board to achieve well in their studies, and to consider their future contributions to their communities.

Deadline is April 15

Criteria

1. Applicants must be enrolled as full-time students at Camosun College.
2. Applicants must be eligible to be funded by the Saanich Indian School Board.
3. Applicants must provide permission for the First Nations Education and Services office to check their Fall and Winter semester grades.
4. Applicants must write a letter that describes their educational goals, and considers how their education might benefit their community.
5. Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony in which the Saanich Indian School Board Award for Camosun College students will be presented.
6. Only complete applications will be considered.

The Saanich Indian School Board Award for Camosun College Students is awarded annually in amounts of $500.


Cowichan Trading Company Award
 
THE COWICHAN TRADING COMPANY, LOCATED IN VICTORIA, BC, HAS BEEN IN BUSINESS SINCE 1966. IT STARTED AS A SMALL TRADING DEPOT WHERE NATIVE ARTISANS WOULD SUPPLY CARVINGS AND HANDMADE COWICHAN SWEATERS. IT HAS NOW EXPANDED TO THREE LOCATIONS. THIS AWARD GIVES BACK TO THE FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITY BY PROVIDING AN ANNUAL GIFT TO AN OUTSTANDING STUDENT.
THE AWARD IS PROVIDED TO FIRST NATIONS STUDENTS AT CAMOSUN COLLEGE WHO ARE IN PROGRAMS THAT WILL PREPARE THEM TO SERVE CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES. RECIPIENTS WILL BE THOSE STUDENTS WHO BEST EXEMPLIFY THE VALUES OF THOSE PROGRAMS.

Criteria
1. First Nations ancestry and enrolled in First Nations Family support worker program, or in its absense, another program that prepares students to serve children and families in First Nations communities
2. Applicants must demonstrate satisfactory educational achievement and provide proof of current registration in or acceptance to a Health and Human Services program at Camosun College.
3. Applicants must include a letter which describes their education and employment goals, and how they plan to use their education to benefit other people.
4. Applicants must include a letter of recommendation from their community, or from an educator, attesting to their aptitude to work in a health and human services field.
5. Applicants must demonstrate financial need.
6. Only complete applications will be considered.
2. SATISFACTORY RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT WHILE AT CAMOSUN COLLEGE.
3. DEMONSTRATED CULTURAL AND PERSONAL GROWTH WHILE IN THE PROGRAM.
4. DEMONSTRATED SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE, AND ATTITUDE CONSISTENT WITH THE TEACHINGS OF THE PROGRAM.
5. DEMONSTRATED ABILITY TO CREATE AND SUPPORT COMMUNITY AMONGST STUDENTS IN THE PROGRAM.
6. RECOMMENDATION FROM PRACTICUM OR FIELD SUPERVISOR.

THERE IS NO APPLICATION PROCESS FOR THE COWICHAN TRADING COMPANY AWARD. THE RECIPIENT WILL BE CHOSEN BY A PANEL COMPOSED OF STAFF AND FACULTY WHO WORK CLOSELY WITH STUDENTS WHO MAY BE RECIPIENTS OF THE AWARD. THE PANEL WILL SEEK THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE FIELD SUPERVISOR.

The award is administered through the Camosun College Foundation and First Nations Education and Services Department.


The Allen and Loreen Vandekerkhove Family Foundation Bursary for First Nations Health and Human Services Students

established in September 2004. The purpose of the Bursary is to assist and support First Nations students who are enrolled in or entering Health and Human Services programs. Priority will be given to those students who have applied for and are qualified for programs covered under the First Nations Limited Priority Admissions process. Students in other Health and Humans Services programs may also apply for this Award.

Applicants must include a self-written letter describing their education and employment goals, and how they plan to use their education to benefit other people. Applicants must also include a reference letter from their community or from an educator attesting to their aptitude for working in a health and human services field.

The Award is jointly administered through the Camosun College Foundation and the First Nations Education and Services office. Recipients must be attending or accepted to a Health and Human Services program at Camosun College.

Deadline is August 21.

Criteria
1. Applicants must demonstrate First Nations ancestry.
2. Applicants must demonstrate satisfactory educational achievement and provide proof of current registration in or acceptance to a Health and Human Services program at Camosun College.
3. Applicants must include a letter which describes their education and employment goals, and how they plan to use their education to benefit other people.
4. Applicants must include a letter of recommendation from their community, or from an educator, attesting to their aptitude to work in a health and human services field.
5. Applicants must demonstrate financial need.
6. Only complete applications will be considered.

If you have questions about the award or how to apply for it please contact the First Nations Education and Services office at (250) 370-3299.

The Allen and Loreen Vandekerkhove Family Foundation Bursary for First Nations Health and Human Services Students will be awarded annually in amounts of not less than $750. The first bursaries will be given out after September 2005.


The Songhees Nation/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award

was made on the occasion of the ceremonial signing of the Affiliation Agreement, June 21, 2005.

The purpose of the award is to encourage Songhees students who are working towards strong achievement in their studies, and to consider their future contributions to their community.

Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony at which the Songhees Nation/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award will be presented.

Deadline is April 21.

Criteria
1. Applicants must be enrolled as full-time Camosun College; and
2. Applications must be funded by the Songhees Nation; and
3. Applicants must have a satisfactory record of achievement in the past academic year; and
4. Applicants must provide permission for the First Nations Education and Services office to check their Fall and Winter semester grades; and
5. Applicants must write a letter that describes their educational goals, and considers how their education might benefit their community; and
6. Applicants must include a letter of reference from a community member (non-family) or a teacher; and
7. Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony at which the Songhees Nation/Camosun College Affiliation Award will be presented; and
8. Only complete applications will be considered.


The Eulau Howard Memorial Award for Camosun College First Nations Students

was established by Mr. Art Howard in memory of his wife Eulau to encourage First Nations students studying at Camosun College. Mr. Howard wanted recipients of this award to be community-minded individuals who are pursuing education that will result in a career. Applicants' community service and financial need will be given serious consideration.
The award is administered through the Camosun College First Nations Education and Services office. Recipients are expected to attend a ceremony to receive their awards.

Deadline is January 21

Criteria
1. Applicants must be of First Nations ancestry and must be enrolled as full-time students at Camosun College.
2. Applicants must have a satisfactory record of achievement at Camosun College and include a record of marks and proof of current registration in their application.
3. Applicants must include a self-written letter outlining educational goals, employment aspirations, and community involvement and service.
4. Applications must include a letter of recommendation from a First Nations organization, teacher, or community group that attests to and gives examples of the applicant's commitment to community work.
5. Only complete applications will be considered.

The Eulau Howard Memorial Award is awarded annually in amounts of not less than $400 each.


The Victoria Native Friendship Centre/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award

was made on the occasion of the ceremonial signing of the Affiliation Agreement, November 14, 2005.

The purpose of the award is to encourage students who are funded by the Victoria Native Friendship Centre to work towards strong achievement in their studies, and to consider their future contributions to their community.

Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony at which the Victoria Native Friendship Centre/Camosun College Affiliation Agreement Award will be presented.

Deadline is April 21.

Criteria
1. Applicants must be enrolled as full-time Camosun College students; and
2. Applications must be funded by the Victoria Native Friendship Centre; and
3. Applicants must have a satisfactory record of achievement in the past academic year; and
4. Applicants must provide permission for the First Nations Education and Services office to check their Fall and Winter semester grades; and
5. Applicants must write a letter that describes their educational goals, and considers how their education might benefit their community; and
6. Applicants must include a letter of reference from a community member (non-family) or a teacher; and
7. Recipients are expected to attend the college awards ceremony at which the Victoria Native Friendship Centre/Camosun College Affiliation Award will be presented; and
8. Only complete applications will be considered.


The Winona Wood Award for First Nations Women

was established in 1993 by Miss Winona Wood. Miss Wood has been a supporter of women's rights since the 1930's. The purpose of the award is to assist and encourage First Nations women who are seeking education or training that will lead to employment or self-employment. Miss Wood wished to support First Nations women who are in need and whose career plans include helping and working with others.

Deadline is January 21.

The award was originally called "CENANELEN," which is translated to "it is helper, it is support" in SENCOTEN, the language of the WSANEC, one of the traditional peoples of the Camosun College region. In 2004 the award was renamed for its benefactor.

The award is administered through the Camosun College First Nations Education and Services office. Recipients must be students at Camosun College and are expected to attend an awards ceremony.

Criteria
1. Applicants must demonstrate financial need
2. Applicants must demonstrate satisfactory educational achievement and provide proof of current registration at Camosun College.
3. Applicants must include a letter which states the applicant's plans after completion of studies.
4. Applicants must include a letter of recommendation from a First Nations organization or an educational institution.
Only complete applications will be considered.

The Winona Wood Award is provided annually in amounts of not less than $500 each.

Please send or drop off completed applications to:
First Nations Education and Services,
Ewing Building, Room 272
Camosun College,
3100 Foul Bay Road,
Victoria, BC V8P 5J2

Phone (250) 370-3299
Fax (250) 370-3291

Confederation College

Confederation College:

Fort William First Nation Student Excellence Award

Metis Nation of Ontario Scholarship

Ontario Power Generation/Negahneewin Incentive Award

Thunder Bay Children's Services Foundation Award

Mae Katt "Premier's Award" Bursary

Medical Services Branch, Ontario Region Health Canada Award

Oshki Anishnawbeg Student Association "Giinisidynago" Award

Bristol Aerospace Ltd. Scholarship

Ontario Power Generation Award


Information:
Diane Boyer
Student Finance
Phone: (807) 475-6185
Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca


Fort William First Nation Student Excellence Award

Value: Two at $400

Awarded to students from the Fort William First Nation in any college program on the basis of merit, grade point average of 3.00 or greater, involvement in college and or community and financial need. A brief essay is required describing college/community involvement and career goals.

Selected in consultation with Aboriginal Support Services and the Education Officer of Fort William First Nation. (Attach essay)


Métis Nation of Ontario Scholarship

Value: To be determined annually

Awarded to students from any program who are members of the Metis community in Ontario; have at least one grandparent who is or was an Aboriginal person and not registered as an Indian under the Indian Act, or as an Inuk on an Inuit Registry, or members of the Ontario Metis and Aboriginal Association on the basis of financial need. (A separate application available through the Student Finance Office is required)


Ontario Power Generation/Negahneewin Incentive Award

Value: Five at $1000

Awarded to students of aboriginal ancestry on the basis of academic achievement, involvement in internal and extra-curricular activities. Students must be in Aboriginal Transition, Engineering Technology or related technical programs, Business Administration or related management programs. (A separate application form available through the Student Finance Office is required)


Thunder Bay Children's Services Foundation Award

Value: Two at $350

Awarded to first year students from either Social Service Worker, Child and Youth Worker or Office Administration General programs on the basis of financial need and academic achievement. One bursary will be awarded to a student of Aboriginal ancestry. (Attach proof of ancestry i.e. status card)


Mae Katt "Premier's Award" Bursary

Value: One at $500

Awarded to a Nursing student on the basis of financial need. Student must be of aboriginal ancestry. (Attach proof of ancestry i.e. status card)


Medical Services Branch, Ontario Region Health Canada Award

Value: To be determined yearly

Awarded to First Nations' Nursing, Practical Nursing or Medical Radiation Technology students on the basis of financial need. (Attach proof of First Nations' status i.e. status card)


Oshki Anishnawbeg Student Association "Giinisidynago" Award

Value: Three at $100

Awarded to aboriginal students who exhibit a positive role model for other aboriginal students, show a keen interest and involvement in college activities and a grade point average of 2.75 or greater.


Awards that are not specific to Aboriginal but are for equity groups which include women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, visible minority. These awards are not open to application, but are chosen by consultation with faculty.

Bristol Aerospace Ltd. Scholarship

Value One at $400

Awarded to a member of an employment equity group (women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, visible minority) who is a third year Aviation Manufacturing Engineering Technology student on the basis of academic merit, leadership qualities and faculty recommendation.


Ontario Power Generation Award

Value: One at $1000

Awarded to a member of an employment equity group (women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, visible minority) who has completed one year of Electrical/Electronics/Instrumentation Technician or a Technology program on the basis of academic achievement (minimum B average);strong oral and written communication skills; demonstrated leadership ability; involvement in extra-curricular activities; will not be receiving more than one award of equal or greater value in his/her second year; legally eligible to work in Canada upon completion of his/her program. Selected in consultation with program faculty.

Information:
Diane Boyer
Student Finance
Phone: (807) 475-6185
Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Metis Nation of Ontario Scholarship Value: To be determined annually Awarded to students from any program who are members of the Metis community in Ontario; have at least one grandparent who is or was an Aboriginal person and not registered as an Indian under the Indian Act, or as an Inuk on an Inuit Registry, or members of the Ontario Metis and Aboriginal Association on the basis of financial need. (A separate application available through the Student Finance Office is required) Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Ontario Power Generation/Negahneewin Incentive Award Value: Five at $1000 Awarded to students of aboriginal ancestry on the basis of academic achievement, involvement in internal and extra-curricular activities. Students must be in Aboriginal Transition, Engineering Technology or related technical programs, Business Administration or related management programs. ( A separate application form available through the Student Finance Office is required) Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Thunder Bay Children's Services Foundation Award Value: Two at $350 Awarded to first year students from either Social Service Worker, Child and Youth Worker or Office Administration General programs on the basis of financial need and academic achievement. One bursary will be awarded to a student of aboriginal ancestry. (Attach proof of ancestry i.e. status card) Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Mae Katt "Premier's Award" Bursary Value: One at $500 Awarded to a Nursing student on the basis of financial need. Student must be of aboriginal ancestry. (Attach proof of ancestry i.e. status card) Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Medical Services Branch, Ontario Region Health Canada Award Value: To be determined yearly Awarded to First Nations' Nursing, Practical Nursing or Medical Radiation Technology students on the basis of financial need. (Attach proof of First Nations' status i.e. status card) Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Oshki Anishnawbeg Student Association "Giinisidynago" Award Value: Three at $100 Awarded to aboriginal students who exhibit a positive role model for other aboriginal students, show a keen interest and involvement in college activities and a grade point average of 2.75 or greater. Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Awards that are not specific to aboriginal but are for equity groups which include women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, visible minority. These awards are not open to application, but are chosen by consultation with faculty. Bristol Aerospace Ltd. Scholarship Value One at $400 Awarded to a member of an employment equity group (women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, visible minority) who is a third year Aviation Manufacturing Engineering Technology student on the basis of academic merit, leadership qualities and faculty recommendation. Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP Ontario Power Generation Award Value: One at $1000 Awarded to a member of an employment equity group (women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, visible minority) who has completed one year of Electrical/Electronics/Instrumentation Technician or a Technology program on the basis of academic achievement (minimum B average);strong oral and written communication skills; demonstrated leadership ability; involvement in extra-curricular activities; will not be receiving more than one award of equal or greater value in his/her second year; legally eligible to work in Canada upon completion of his/her program. Selected in consultation with program faculty. Information: Diane Boyer Student Finance Phone: (807) 475-6185 Email: dboyer@confederationc.on.ca BACKTOP">dboyer@confederationc.on.ca

 

First Nations University of Canada

First Nations University of Canada students are eligible for all awards offered by the First Nations University of Canada and the University of Regina.

Application forms for First Nations University of Canada awards are available from the First Nations University of Canada Student Success Services. General inquiries should be directed to:

First Nations University of Canada Scholarship Committee
1 First Nations Way
Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 7K2

Phone: 306 790-5950, ext. 3100
Fax: 306 790-5996

Web site: www.firstnationsuniversity.ca

 


 

Henry Baker Scholarships - City of Regina

The City of Regina offers six scholarships to students at the University of Regina including one at SIFC in Regina

Value: 2 @ $1000 and 4 @ $2,000

Eligibility: Varies

Deadline: August 1st

Information:
Phone: (306) 777-7800

Application form: www.cityregina.com

Return completed application to:
City of Regina
Public Affairs Division
City Hall, 14 th Floor
P. O. Box 1790
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3C8


Albert Bellegarde Memorial Scholarship

Ayahkamimakan Pimatisiwin (Life Continues) Bursary

Bobby Bird Memorial Scholarship

CIC Aboriginal Bursary

Cree Language Incentive Award

Dr. Margaret P. Hess Award              
                                                                     
Gary Bosgoed Scholarship for Aboriginals in Engineering                                     

Dr. Oliver Brass Graduate Studies Award

Drs. Lewis and Elisabeth Brandt Scholarship

First Nations University of Canada Board of Governors
Graduate Entrance Scholarship

First Nations University of Canada (Molson) Entrance Scholarship

Grain Services Union Bursary

Hudson's Bay Company Student Achievement Award for Excellence

Indian Artist Award

Information Systems Management (ISM) Scholarship

Jack Adelman Scholarship

Jean Shoebridge Memorial Book Prize

John B. Tootoosis Scholarship

Library Book Award

Many Nations/Maritime Life Assurance Award

Margaret & Clare Sherrard Friendship Scholarship

Mary Ahenakew Memorial Scholarship Award

Meyers Norris Penny LLP Scholarship

Public History Award

Saskatchewan Health Bursary Program

SaskEnergy Scholarship

Sasktel Scholarship                                                                                                   

SGI Stan Hamilton Scholarship

Sharon Carrier Convocation Award

Solomon Mosquito Scholarship in English

Talisman Energy Aboriginal Award

TD Bursary Program

Wendy Swenson Memorial Scholarship

Weyerhaeuser Community Education Award  

Xerox Aboriginal Scholarship Program

 

First Nations University of Canada students are eligible for all awards offered by the First Nations University of Canada and the University of Regina.

Application forms for First Nations University of Canada awards are available from the First Nations University of Canada Student Success Services. General inquiries should be directed to:

First Nations University of Canada Scholarship Committee
1 First Nations Way
Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 7K2

Phone: 306 790-5950, extension 3100
Fax: 306 790-5996
Web site: www.firstnationsuniversity.ca

Grant MacEwan University

Grant McEwan University

Grant MacEwan
University Foundation

Robert C. Carson Memorial Bursary

Sylvia Schulze Memorial Bursary for Alex Taylor School

Alberta Indian Arts and Craft Society Scholarship

Alberta Health Careers Bursary

Aboriginal Leadership Development Awards

Canative Housing Corp. Award

CFCW Ltd. Scholarships

92.5 CKNG FM Scholarship

Claudette Rendall Award

CN Bursary

Dreamcatcher Scholarship

Eagle Feather Award

Oldies 1260 CFRN/CFRB-The Bear Scholarship

Robert Markle Scholarship

Social Services Bursary Program

 

Information:
Student Awards Office
Student Advising Centre
Room 7-112A City Centre Campus
Grant MacEwan University
P.O.Box 1796
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2P2
Phone: (780) 497-5063


Grant MacEwan University Foundation - Alberta

Deadline for application June 15 for following academic year

Aboriginal business Leadership Award

Value: Four (4) awards of $1,500 each

Value: Two scholarships of $1,000.

This scholarship is awarded to a promising young Alberta Indian artist who has shown excellence or creativity in his or her work.

Eligibility: Applicants may submit one to five slides of different works (any medium). Submissions should be accompanied by a resume.

Deadline: January 21


Alberta Health Careers Bursary - Grant MacEwan University

Value: Twenty scholarships totalling $12,000.

Eligibility: Applicants must: be Indian (Status or Non-Status),Inuit or Metis; have resided in Alberta for the last three years; have completed at least one year of post-secondary study in a health care field; demonstrate financial need;and have maintained full-time enrollment (60%of a full course load)and passing marks in all courses in their previous year of study.

Deadline: May 15


Aboriginal Leadership Development Awards - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One award of $1,500.

Eligibility: Applicants must be Aboriginal students attending a public post-secondary institution, and be enrolled in a program leading to a certificate, diploma or degree in a business or commerce program. First priority is given to self-employed Aboriginal students, second priority to mature Aboriginal students, and third priority to Aboriginal students attending a post-secondary institution.

Deadline: June 15


Canative Housing Corp. Award - Grant MacEwan University

Value: Various awards of up to $2,500.

Eligibility: Awarded to students of Métis ancestry who attend Grant MacEwan Community College. Students must display an above-average academic standing and present financial need. The Student Resource Centre recommends students to
the Canative Housing Corporation Board. Board members choose the most appropriate recipients.

Deadline: September 20


CFCW Ltd. Scholarships - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One scholarship of $1,000.

Eligibility: Awarded to a Native Communications student who achieves the highest percentage in NC213.3 (Journalism).

Information:
No application required. Recipient is chosen by the Native Communications Program.


92.5 CKNG FM Scholarship - Grant MacEwan University

Value: Four scholarships of $500.

Eligibility: Awarded to Native Communications students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement.

Information:
No application required. Recipients are chosen by the Native Communications Program.


Claudette Rendall Award - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One award of $75.

Eligibility: Awarded to one student registered in the Ben Calf Robe Program who: displays dedication to his or her studies; shows enthusiasm for learning; perseveres in math; is a positive role model for other students; completes assignments in a timely fashion; displays practical application of math in daily life; and demonstrates good attendance and punctuality.

Information:
No application required.The recipient is chosen by instructors.


CN Bursary - Grant MacEwan University

Value:Two scholarships of $500.

Eligibility: Awarded to Aboriginal women in a business-related discipline. Students in the Business Division must apply. First priority is given to students in the Management Studies or Bachelor of Commerce programs.


Dreamcatcher Scholarship - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One scholarship of $300.

Eligibility: Awarded to an Aboriginal student in the Child and Youth Care Program who has persevered in pursuing his or her educational dream,and who has inspired others to pursue their dreams.

Information:
No application required. Recipient is chosen by the Child and Youth Care Program.


Eagle Feather Award - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One scholarship of $200.

Eligibility: Awarded annually to a Native Communications student who: is hardworking, has good communications skills and attendance, and participates in college life; shows humility, respect, kindness, and honesty, and who shares and provides inspiration in his or her dealings with others; and is a good role model committed to the betterment of Aboriginal life.

Information:
No application required. Recipient is chosen by the Native Communications students in he fall trimester.


Oldies 1260 CFRN/CFRB-The Bear Scholarship - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One scholarship of $550.

Eligibility: Awarded to a Native music student who demonstrates outstanding academic achievement in comparison with other Native students.

Information:
No application required. Recipient is chosen by the Music Program.


Robert Markle Scholarship - Grant MacEwan University

Value: One scholarship of $1,200

Eligibility: Awarded annually to a First Nation student in the first or later year of a visual arts program at a post- secondary institution.

Deadline: December 31

 


Social Services Bursary Program - Grant MacEwan University

Value: Varies

Eligibility: Métis or Non-Status Indians who have been Alberta residents for at least three years before applying; enrolled in a recognized post-secondary
educational institution and studying in a social services discipline; and provide proof of enrollment and confirmation of a full course workload.

Deadline: Applications are accepted from January 1 to April 30.

Information:
Student Awards Office
Student Advising Centre
Room 7-112A City Centre Campus
Grant MacEwan University
P.O.Box 1796
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2P2
Phone: (780) 497-5063

Lakehead University

Lakehead University:

Ron Duhamel Award

Dr. Heriette Seyfert Prize

Joseph W. Auger Award

Thunder Bay Children's Services Foundation Bursaries

Bridget Veronica Morton Memorial Bursaries

The Hamlin Family Award

Ontario Hydro Native Awards

Placer Dome Native Award

Shell Canada Limited Native Entrance Award

Minhal Holding Ltd. Award

Information:
Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Officer
Financial Aid Office
955 Oliver Road
Lakehead University
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1
Phone: (807) 343-8923
Fax: (807) 346-7760


Ron Duhamel Award - Lakehead University

Awarded to the highest ranking Native student entering the second year of the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Education (Native Education) at Lakehead University.

One award of $100

Eligibility: Native student entering the second year of Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Education (Native Education).

Duration: Annual

Deadline: Recommended by School of Education.


Thunder Bay Children's Services Foundation Bursaries - Lakehead University

To a social work student of Native ancestry. A second bursary is also available to a first-year social work student.

Amount: Two bursaries of $350 each

Eligibility: Student of Native ancestry including Métis and Non-Status Indian. (The second bursary is open to all first-year social work students.)

Duration: Annual

Deadline: November 17 of each year


Bridget Veronica Morton Memorial Bursaries - Lakehead University

Award for a Native undergraduate student.

Amount: Four awards of $500

Eligibility: Must be of Native Canadian heritage.
Must be an undergraduate student at Lakehead University.
Awarded on the basis of demonstrated financial need.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: November 17 each year


The Hamlin Family Lakehead University 30th Anniversary Award - Lakehead University

An incentive award to a Native Access Program for Engineering (NAPE) student on
completion of the NAPE program.

Amount: $600

Eligibility: Academic improvement. Attendance. Commitment to the NAPE program and full-time registration in the first year of the Engineering Technology program.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: Awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Engineering by the staff of the Native Access Program for Engineering.


Minhal Holding Limited - Native Access Program for Engineering - Lakehead University

An incentive award to an NAPE student on completion of the NAPE program.

Amount: $600

Eligibility: Academic improvement. Attendance.
Commitment to the NAPE program and full-time registration in the first year of the Engineering Technology program.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: Awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Engineering by the staff of the Native Access Program for Engineering.


Shell Canada Limited Native Entrance Award - Lakehead University

Awarded to a Native student entering Lakehead University.

Amount: One award of $800.

Eligibility: Native ancestry. High academic standing. Community involvement.
Participation in student affairs. Financial need.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: April 15 of each year.


Placer Dome Native Award - Lakehead University

To a Native student entering either education, nursing or social work.

Amount: $4,000 over a four-year period, or one award of $1,000 per year.

Eligibility: Native student from the Shibogama or Windigo Band.
Enrolled at Lakehead University in:
. Education
. Nursing
. Social work.
Academic performance.

Duration: Four years based on performance.

Deadline: April 15 of each year.


Ontario Hydro Native Awards - Lakehead University

To first-year or continuing Native students in selected programs.

Amount: Five awards of $15,000 each

Eligibility: Native student enrolled full-time in one of the following programs:
. All science programs
. Arts program with geography and economics majors
. Business administration
. Commerce
. Engineering
. Forestry.
Academic performance.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: April 15 each year


Dr. Heriette Seyfert Memorial Prize in Native Language - Lakehead University

Awarded to the student whose average mark computed on all Native language courses is highest for the year.

One award of $100

Eligibility: Completion of at least three full course equivalents in Native language studies at Lakehead University. Academic performance.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: No application. Candidate recommended by the Native language instructors.


Joseph W. Auger Memorial Award - Lakehead University

Awarded in the second term to Native students in the second, third or fourth year at Lakehead University.

One award of $200.

Eligibility: Student of North American Native ancestry on the basis of satisfactory academic standing and financial need.

Duration: Annual

Information:
Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Officer
Financial Aid Office
955 Oliver Road
Lakehead University
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1
Phone: (807) 343-8923
Fax: (807) 346-7760

Nipissing University

Nipissing University:

Phyllis Kathleen Hart Memorial Bursaries

Nipissing University Arts and Science Aboriginal Award

Alan J. Johnson Memorial Scholarship

Nipissing University Faculty of Education Aboriginal Award

Information Contact:
Jennifer Mercer
Student Awards Coordinator
Nipissing University
100 College Drive, Box 5002
North Bay, ON P1B 8L7
Phone: (705) 474-3450 ext. 4311
Fax: (705) 474-5295
Email: jennm@nipissingu.ca
Internet: www.nipissingu.ca


Phyllis Kathleen Hart Memorial Bursaries - Nipissing University

Value: Variable ($500 minimum)

Application required: Yes

Type: Bursary

Awarded on the basis of financial need to Aboriginal Nipissing University students. Complete a Nipissing University Application for Student Awards available from the Financial Aid Office.

Deadline: October 15


Nipissing University Arts and Science Aboriginal Award - Nipissing University

Value: $500

Application required: Yes

Type: Award
Presented annually to a second year full-time Aboriginal student enrolled in an Arts and Science degree program who has a minimum overall average of 75% and demonstrates financial need. Apply on the Nipissing University Application for Student Awards available from the Financial Aid Office.

Deadline: October 15


Alan J. Johnson Memorial Scholarship - Nipissing University

Value: $150

Application required: Yes

Type: Scholarship

Awarded to the applicant of Native Canadian Ancestry enrolled in the full-time Bachelor of Education Program with the highest prerequisite qualifications. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office.

Deadline: October 15


Nipissing University Faculty of Education Aboriginal Award - Nipissing University

Value: $500

Application required: Yes

Type: Award

Presented annually to a full-time Aboriginal student enrolled in the Faculty of Education who has a minimum admission average of 75% and demonstrates financial need. Apply on the Nipissing University Student Bursary application available from the Financial Aid Office.

Deadline: October 15

Information Contact:
Jennifer Mercer
Student Awards Coordinator
Nipissing University
100 College Drive, Box 5002
North Bay, ON P1B 8L7
Phone: (705) 474-3450 ext. 4311
Fax: (705) 474-5295
Email: jennm@nipissingu.ca
Internet: www.nipissingu.ca

Portage College

Portage College :

Awards Available to Students Registered in Academic Upgrading

This is a list of awards, scholarships and bursaries available to students registered in academic upgrading programs at Portage College. Please refer to the specific criteria in order to determine your eligibility based on program requirements or other specific terms and conditions.

NAME OF AWARD
Academic/Athletic Award

Academic Preparation Program Wellness Award

Adult High School Equivalence Scholarship

Brandon Swan Memorial Bursary

Debhra Dennison Memorial Award

Emergent Need Bursary

Female Athlete of the Year Award

Fred & Vera Saunders Dedication to Education Award

Jimmie Condon Athletic Awards for Volleyball

Laurence Decore Award for Student Leadership

Learning Assistance Centre Bursary

Len Calliou Memorial Award

Male Athlete of the Year Award

Northlands Park Achievement Award

Opening Doors Entrance Bursary

Outstanding Student Award

Partnership Awards Program

Pow Wow Association Award

Quality of Life Award

Reading Participation Award

TransCanada Bursary

Transition to Training Bursary

Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships  Cross-Country Running

Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships  Cross-Country Skiing

Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships  Curling

Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships  Golf

For information:
Portage College
Lac La Biche: (780) 623-5580
Cold Lake: (780) 594-3255
St. Paul: (780) 645-6214

Web: www.portage.ab.ca


Academic Preparation Program Wellness Award

Value: $150
Number Awarded: 1 per year
Criteria:
· Must be enrolled in the Academic Preparation program
· Maintain acceptable progress (passing all courses) and attendance
· Shows preparedness for class, willingness to help others, goal setting and a positive attitude towards
school and others
· Maintains and strives for personal wellness
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Selected by Program Staff


Adult High School Equivalence Scholarship

Value: $500
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in an Academic Upgrading program
· Must be out of high school for a minimum of 3 years prior to commencement of upgrading
· Achieve a minimum average of 80% in courses required for entry into a post-secondary program
Deadline: September 1st
Application: Nominated by Program Coordinator

Alberta Pacific Native Cultural Arts Award

Value: $100
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Demonstrate financial need
· Progress from the Native Cultural Arts Worker Instructor program to the Native Artisans program or
from the Native Artisans program to the Native Cultural Arts Worker Instructor program
· Demonstrate academic achievement, leadership skills and commitment to assisting other students or
student organizations
· Must confirm registration in the fall
Deadline: Must be progressing to Native Artisans or vice-versa and must confirm enrolment before
bursary is released.
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Board of Governors Entrance Scholarship

Value: $800
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Register for the first time in a career training program at Portage College
· Must be an Alberta resident for 1 complete year
· Must possess a high school diploma or equivalent with an overall average of 75% or better in three 30
level core subjects
· Copy of transcript
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Brandon Swan Memorial Bursary

Value: $125
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Available to an Aboriginal male at least 18 years of age
· Enrolled in the Academic Upgrading 200 Level program
· Must maintain an 'A' grading and be accessing services from the Learning Assistance Centre
· Must demonstrate financial need
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Career & Technology Strand Entrance Bursary

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 7
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a career training program
· Demonstrate financial need
· Must have successfully completed CTS courses related to career training/career goal
· Provide most recent high school transcript identifying the CTS course
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Distance Education Bursary

Value: $250
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Must be a full-time student currently enrolled in a career program taking a distance education course
over and above full-time courses
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Alberta resident
· Must maintain satisfactory progress
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre
Emergent Need Bursary

Value: $200
Number Awarded: 20 available for students in Academic Upgrading
10 available for students in Career programs
Bursaries given out monthly throughout the year as required
Criteria:
· Enrolled in a program full-time
· Must be an Alberta resident
· One time financial shortfall situation
· Award is deemed to make a difference in whether a student is able to remain in full-time studies
· Submit budget detailing the current financial situation including an explanation of resolving the situation
for the remainder of the year
· Only 1 award to be given per household
Deadline: Continuous acceptance of applications throughout the academic year
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


First Year Career Bursary

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 9
Criteria:
· Must be a first year career program student registering in a second year of studies or related studies
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Maintain satisfactory progress and attendance while in training
· Written essay describing career plans upon graduation
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Forest technician Alumni Entrance Award

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in the Forest Technician program
· Meet all entrance requirements for the program
· Satisfactory attendance and progress
· Have taken Forestry CTS courses in high school
· Attach highschool transcripts
Deadline: October 30th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Forestry Fellowship Award

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Currently enrolled full-time or a past graduate of the Forest Technician program
· Provide proof of registration into a recognized and approved forestry school or program
Deadline: October 30th
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Fred & Vera Saunders Dedication to Education Award

Value: $500
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in any Portage College program
· Having to travel at least 60 km per day to attend classes
· Satisfactory attendance and progress
· Financial need verified by application and budget submission
· Must provide documentation on sponsorship and or income
Deadline: January 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Governor General's Collegiate Bronze Medal

Value: Bronze Medallion
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Successful completion of a 2 year diploma program
· Obtain the highest academic standing in a post-secondary diploma program
· Obtain an average of 80% or better
Deadline: May 15th
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Helping Hand Bursary (For Post-Secondary Students)

Value: $200 for single student/married no children
$400 for single parent/married with children
Number Awarded: varies per semester
Criteria:
· Must be enrolled full-time in a post-secondary career program
· Demonstrate financial need
· Have acceptable progress and attendance
Deadline: November 15th and March 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


IKON Award

Value: $400
Number Awarded: 4
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a 1st or 2nd year of a career program
· Must be an Alberta resident
· Must have outstanding academic achievement
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Jason Lang Scholarship

Value: $1,000
Number Awarded: varies
Criteria:
· Must be an Alberta resident
· Must have completed 1 year of an undergraduate post-secondary program in Alberta that is at least 2
years in length
· Average of marks obtained in the first year of study must be equivalent to at least 80%
· The student must have been enrolled in at least 80% of a full course load based on the institution's
requirement
· Students can take this award to another institution in Alberta but they cannot take it outside Alberta
· Students cannot receive both the Jason Lang Scholarship and the Louise McKinney Scholarship
Deadline: Ongoing


Jimmie Condon Athletic Award ( for Volleyball)

Value: $1,800
Number Awarded: 24 (12 for men and 12 for women)
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a career program
· Must be an Alberta resident
· Is a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant
· Maintain an average of 65%
· Must be a member of the Voyageurs volleyball team
· Maintains or has maintained a practice and training program acceptable to the coach
· Has fulfilled obligations to his/her respective team
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Apply to the Portage College Recreation Department


Lac La Biche Bicentennial Bursary

Value: $800
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a career training program
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Must be an Alberta resident
· Write an essay or do an oral presentation on the influence the community of Lac La Biche has had on
your chosen profession and the benefits the community will have upon completion of studies
· Must be educated for at least 7 years in the Lac La Biche public school system
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Lakeland Regional Health Authority Aboriginal Practical Nursing Award of Excellence

Value: $1,150
Number Awarded: 2 for September 2002 and 2 for September 2003 ONLY
Criteria:
· Must be registered in the Licensed Practical Nursing program at Portage College
· Must be of Aboriginal descent
· Must demonstrate academic success near or at graduation (passing all courses)
· Must show a caring and positive attitude and a desire to work for the Lakeland Regional Health
Authority
· Must provide resume and a reference letter from Clinical Nursing Instructor and/or previous employers
Deadline: August 30th
Application: Clinical nursing instructor shall nominate candidate/jointly select recipients with Lakeland Regional Health Authority representative


Laurence Decore Award for Student leadership

Value: $500
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Enrolled in a minimum of 3 full-time courses at a designated post-secondary institution in Alberta
· Must be an Alberta resident
· Applicant must display a notable level of commitment in one of the following areas:
- student government
- student societies, clubs or organizations
- non-profit community organizations
Deadline: March 1st
Application: Must be nominated by their peers and then recommended by their institution's Selection
Committee


Learning Assistance Centre Bursary

Value: $500
Number Awarded: 4 (2 for students in Academic Upgrading and
2 for students in Career programs)
Criteria:
· Enrolled for the first time, or after a 3 year absence from a program at Portage College
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Must be an Alberta resident for 1 complete year
· Must be diagnosed with a learning disability
· Provide proof of diagnosis
· Written essay or oral presentation describing the difficulties encountered prior to diagnosis and your
plan for the future
Deadline: December 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Len Calliou Memorial Award

Value: $200
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Enrolled in the Class I Truck Transport Training program
· Must be a registered member of a Metis Settlement
· Have demonstrated excellence in the practical skills component of the program
OR should no one qualify under the Class I Transport Training Program by May 1st, the award may be awarded to:
· someone currently enrolled in Academic Upgrading, planning to register in a career program in the
following academic year, at Portage College
· someone who has demonstrated personal growth, strong work ethic, excellent attendance, good progress
and developed positive relationships with fellow students and College staff
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator
Louise McKinney Scholarship

Value: $2,500
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Must be a full-time student in a post-secondary program
· Must be an Alberta resident for 1 complete year
· Enrol in a second or subsequent year of full-time studies of at least one semester in length
· Obtain the highest academic average
· Louise McKinney Scholarships are reserved for the top 2% of students entering their second or
subsequent years of a full-time program
Deadline: May 31st
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Myrna G. Fox Human Services Scholarship

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Enrolled and graduating from a Human Services Diploma program
· Must be pursuing his/her post-secondary education, with preference given to University studies
· Must have a minimum of 80% final average in the second year of the diploma program
· Proof of registration in further studies
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Northlands Park Achievement Award

Value: $150
Number Awarded: 5 (varies)
Criteria:
· Enrolled in a program full-time
· Progress from academic upgrading or a career program to further post-secondary studies
· Demonstrate academic achievement, leadership skills and career goal accomplishments
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Opening Doors Entrance Bursary
(for Community Campus Academic Upgrading students)
Value: $250
Number Awarded: varies
Criteria:
· Enrolled for the first time in an Academic Upgrading program at a Portage College community campus
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Maintain satisfactory progress and attendance while in training
· Be out of the secondary school system for 3 complete years or more
· Have a sporadic employment history
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre

Outstanding Student Award

Value: Plaque
Number Awarded: One per program
Criteria:
· Obtain highest academic achievement while attending full-time studies in a program at Portage College
Deadline: 2 weeks prior to graduation
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Partnership Awards Program
(Portage College Student Association, Campus Recreation, Northern Alberta Development Council)

Value: $1,000
Number Awarded: 3
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a program leading to a certificate or diploma upon completion
· Must be from a northeastern Alberta community with intentions to commit to future employment in
northern Alberta after graduation
· Must be involved with the College in one of the following areas:
a) Academic and athletic excellence and participate in Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference sports
b) Academic excellence and contribute to and participate in campus life activities
c) Academic excellence and contribute to and participate in student government
Deadline: December 1st
Application: Written nomination from staff or students, submitted to the Portage College Athletic Director


Pepsi-Cola Scholarship

Value: $225
Number Awarded: 22
Criteria:
· Must have the highest academic achievement in their program upon completion
· Enrolled full-time as a student in a Career program
· Must have satisfactory attendance and progress
Deadline: 2 weeks prior to graduation
Application: Must be nominated by Program Coordinator

Portage College Board of Governors Bursary

Value: $250
Number Awarded: 15 (6 for single students; 9 for families
NOTE: out of the 15 bursaries, 2 are made available to students at the St. Paul campus)
Criteria:
· Must demonstrate financial need
· Must be a full-time student
· Must be enrolled in a career program
· Must be an Alberta resident for one full year
· Must have satisfactory attendance and progress
· Must provide documentation on sponsorship and/or income
Deadline: March 1, 2003
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Portage College Entrance Scholarships

Value: $500
Number Awarded: 30
Criteria:
· For high school students entering directly into a Portage College post-secondary program
· Must be a full-time student
· Must be coming to school same year as completing high school (with a January or June graduation),
with no other post-secondary or upgrading in between
Deadline: First 30 qualified and accepted into a career program will receive the scholarship after
demonstrating acceptable progress and attendance in the first portion of their program
Application: No application necessary. Award recipients will be selected, and scholarships will be disbursed,
after December 1st by the Awards Office


Pow Wow Association Award

Value: $150
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Must be a resident of Lac La Biche for the past 3 complete years
· Must maintain progress and attendance while registered in a full-time program at the main campus
· Provide most recent progress report
· Must be recognized for the valuable contribution and dedication to bettering the lives of students at the
College or the community of Lac La Biche
· Written verification/reference of volunteer contribution from a non-profit society Board Chairman or
Director of a community organization or club
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Practicum Bursary

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 20
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a career program which includes a field placement component
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Must maintain satisfactory progress and attendance while in training
· Must provide an additional monthly budget breakdown documenting the exceptional expenses to be
incurred while on field placement
Deadline: October 1st, December 1st, February 1st, April 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Presidents Entrance Scholarship

Value: $1000
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Must be an Alberta resident for 1 complete year
· Must possess a high school diploma or equivalent with an overall average of 75% or better in 3 core
subjects taken in Grade 10 through 12
· Register for the first time in a career training program
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Quality of Life Award

Value: $150
Number Awarded: 5
Criteria:
· Significantly enhance the quality of fellow student lives during the past academic year
· Registered in full-time studies
Deadline: May 1st
Application: May be nominated by the Program Coordinator, Housing Manager, Campus Life or Student Association Members


Ray Johnson Memorial Scholarship

Value: $200
Number Awarded: 1
Criteria:
· Must be enrolled in 1 of the Cooking programs
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Must maintain satisfactory academic performance
· Provide progress report
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Reading Participation Award

Value: Certificate; Dictionary; Photograph displayed in College library
Number Awarded: varies
Criteria:
· Display the most improved reading ability (can include quantity of books or items or movement to a
higher reading level)
Deadline: None
Application: Must attend an interview with Portage College Library Awards Panel


Transcanada Bursary

Value: $500
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in a post-secondary program or a program leading to post-secondary studies
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Must be an Alberta resident for 1 complete year
· Must be of Aboriginal ancestry
· Possess promising academic qualifications
To be eligible for matching funds through Northern Alberta Development Council (NADC):
· Enrolled full-time in a post-secondary program leading to a certificate or diploma upon completion
· Must be an Alberta resident for the past 3 years
· Must be from a northern Alberta community with intentions to commit to future employment in northern
Alberta after graduation
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Transition to Training Bursary

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 6 available for community campus students
8 available for main campus students
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in an Academic Upgrading program and will be registering into a career program
· Demonstrate a financial need
· Alberta resident
· Must achieve a high academic standing and maintain satisfactory attendance while in training
· Show proof of registration into a career training program at Portage College
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre


Xerox Award

Value: $150
Number Awarded: 2
Criteria:
· Enrolled full-time in the Office Administration program
· Must have high level of academic achievement in document formatting and
keyboarding skills
Deadline: May 1st
Application: Nominated by the Program Coordinator


Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships - Cross-Country Running

Value: $300
Number Awarded: 4
Criteria:
· Enrolled for the first time as a full-time student at Portage College
· Must participate in Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference sports
· Must be a member of the Portage College Voyageurs Cross-Country Running team
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Must be nominated by the Coach of the Voyageurs Cross-Country Running Team
 

 


Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships - Cross-Country Skiing
Value: $450
Number Awarded: 6
Criteria:
· Enrolled for the first time as a full-time student at Portage College
· Must participate in Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference sports
· Must be a member of the Portage College Voyageurs Cross-Country Ski team
Deadline: March 1st
Application: Must be nominated by the Coach of the Voyageurs Cross-Country Ski Team


Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships - Curling

Value: $400
Number Awarded: 6
Criteria:
· Enrolled for the first time as a full-time student at Portage College
· Must participate in Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference sports
· Must be a member of the Portage College Voyageurs Curling team
Deadline: March 1st
Application: Must be nominated by the Coach of the Voyageurs Curling Team


Voyageurs Athletic Scholarships - Golf

Value: $150
Number Awarded: 4
Criteria:
· Enrolled for the first time as a full-time student at Portage College
· Must participate in Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference sports
· Must be a member of the Portage College Voyageurs Golf team
Deadline: October 15th
Application: Must be nominated by the Coach of the Voyageurs Golf Team

Additional Awards Available from External Agencies

This section provides information on additional awards, bursaries and scholarships available to Portage College students from external organizations and agencies.


Terry Fox Humanitarian Award

Value: $4,000
Number Awarded: Varies
Criteria:
· Must be a Grade 12 graduate or studying towards a first degree or diploma
· Must be 25 years of age or less
· Must show distinction in the pursuits of excellence in academics or athletics, have volunteered and made
contributions to the community, particularly in the face of 'obstacles' (personal, social, financial or
physical challenges that call for courage)
· Must be a Canadian citizen
Deadline: February 1st
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre

TROY DRYSDALE MEMORIAL EMERGENCY SERVICES BURSARY
Value: $5,000
Number Awarded: Varies
Criteria:
· Must be pursuing a career in Public Emergency Services, Fire or EMS, for employment in Northwestern
Alberta
· Accepted into or attending an accredited post-secondary institution full-time
· Must live in or be from northwestern Alberta
· Must demonstrate financial need
· Must be at least 18 years of age
· Clear of criminal convictions
Deadline: June 30th
Application: Forms available from the Student Services Centre

For information:
Portage College
Lac La Biche: (780) 623-5580
Cold Lake: (780) 594-3255
St. Paul: (780) 645-6214

Web: www.portage.ab.ca

Red River College

Red River College Awards, Bursaries & Scholarships for Aboriginal Students

 



Aboriginal Women

Helen Basset Commemorative Student Scholarships

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal women under the age of 31 who demonstrate financial need and are committed to improving the political, cultural and economic well-being of Aboriginal women

Amount:  Four awards of $1000

Application Deadline:  July 30

Information:  www.nwac-hq.org

 


Sibyl McKay Inkster Bursary

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Metis women enrolled in full-time studies who demonstrate satisfactory academic progress and financial need

Amount:  $500

Application Deadline:  January 31

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 


Rose Nolan Memorial Scholarship Fund

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  First Nation women who have completed one year of full-time study

Amount:  Numerous awards

Application Deadline:  June 30

Information:  www.tednolan.com

 



Business

 

Assiniboine Credit Union Bursary

Area of Study:  Business Administration & Business Administration Integrated

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in first year Business Administration or second year Business Administration Integrated.  Applicants must show satisfactory academic progress, demonstrate financial need, community involvement and mentorship qualities.

Amount:  $500 (minimum)

Application Deadline:  April 15

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 


RBC Aboriginal Students Awards Program

Area of Study:  Any program related to the financial services industry

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in or accepted into a full-time program

Amount:  Ten awards of up to $4000

Application Deadline:  February 28

Information:  www.rbc.com/careers/aboriginal_student_awards.html

 


North West Company Scholarship Fund

Area of Study:  Business Administration Integrated – ACCESS Model Program

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students in a second or third year of study who have achieved a minimum standing of 65%

Amount:  Two awards of $1000 (one for second year student and one for third year student)

Application Deadline:  None; selection process

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 


National Indigenous Economic Education Fund

Area of Study:  Business Administration, Community Development/Community Economic Development

Eligibility:  Must be a CANDO member* attending a post secondary institution.  A short essay describing your career goals and aspirations must accompany application.  Selection will be based on Grade 12 marks of post secondary GPA.

(*There is a fee to become a CANDO student member.  Visit www.edo.ca)

Amount:  $6000

Application Deadline:  July 31

 


MB Hydro – Generating Futures Scholarships

Area of Study:  Technology

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full time program

Amount:  Numerous awards of $10,000

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 

 



Culinary Arts

 

Manitoba Lotteries Employment Equity Education Award

Area of study:  Culinary Arts

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students entering their first or second year of the Culinary Arts program at RRC

Amount:  2 awards of $1500

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.mlc.mb.ca

 



Child and Youth Care

Project Neecheewan Award

Area of Study:  Child and Youth Care

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students graduating from the Child and Youth Care program with a desire to assist in improving the quality of life for Aboriginal children and youth

Amount:  Varies

Application Deadline:  None; selection process

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 


Ross A. Johnston Award

Area of Study:  Child and Youth Care

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in first year of Child and Youth Care program who demonstrate satisfactory academic progress and financial need

Amount:  TBA

Application Deadline:  September 30

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 



Creative Communications & Graphic Design

Gil Purcell Memorial Journalism Scholarship

Area of Study:  Journalism

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students studying journalism

Amount:  $4000

Application Deadline:  November 15

Information:  www.cp.org

 



Early Childhood Education

“Our Children, Our Ways” Award

Area of Study:  Early Childhood Education

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students entering first or second year who demonstrate academic achievement and service to Aboriginal children and families

Amount:  Two awards of $750 (One for first year student and one for second year student)

Application Deadline:  October 31

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 



Engineering/Computers

MB Hydro – Employment Equity Bursary

Area of study:  Civil, computer, Electrical or Electronic Engineering Technologies

Eligibility:  Members of an employment equity designated group entering their first year of study

Amount:  Eleven awards of $1500

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 


MB Hydro – Second to Final Year Engineering Bursary

Area of Study:  Electronic, electrical, Computer or Communication Engineering Technologies

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students in their second to final year of study.  Academic performance will be a consideration.

Amount:  Six awards of $1500   

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 


MB Hydro – Generating Futures Scholarships

Area of Study:  Engineering

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full time program

Amount:  Numerous awards of $10,000

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 

 


Helen Betty Osborne Memorial Foundation

 

Area of Study:  Civil Technology or Civil Engineering

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in post-secondary studies with a minimum 60% course load

Amount:  Four awards of $5000

Application Deadline:  August 31

Information:  www.helenbettyosbornefdtn.ca

 



Health

Aboriginal Health Careers

(National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation)

Area of Study:  Health Sciences (Nursing, Radiology, Lab Technology)

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students pursuing full-time study during the upcoming academic year

Amount:  Numerous awards of $1000

Application Deadline:  June 1

Information:  www.naaf.ca

 


TD Aboriginal Nursing Fund

Area of Study:  Nursing

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full-time program

Amount:  TBA

Application Deadline:  March 31

Information:  www.cnf-fiic.ca/scholarships

 



Pre Trades/Trades

Manitoba Lotteries Employment Equity Education Award – Pre Trades/Trades

Area of Study:  Pre trades, Electircal, Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, Piping Trades or Construction Trades

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students entering nto one of the qualifying programs

Amount:  Three awards of $1000 for Trades and one award of $500 for Pre Trades

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.mlc.mb.ca

 


Tim McLean Memorial Bursary

Area of Study:  Trades and apprenticeship

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students with financial entering apprenticeship training to obtain certification in a Manitoba designated trade

Amount:  TBD

Application Deadline:  April 30

Information:  www.manitoba.ca/tradecareers

 


MB Hydro – Generating Futures Scholarships

Area of Study:  Trades

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full time program

Amount:  Numerous awards of $10,000

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 

 



Technology

 

MB Hydro – First Year Information Technology

Area of Study:  Computer Analyst/Programmer or Computer Systems Technology

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students entering their first year of study

Amount:  Two awards of $1500

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 


MB Hydro – Second to Final Year Information Technology Bursary

Area of Study:  Computer Analyst/Programmer or Computer Systems Technology

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students entering their second to final year of study

Amount:  Two awards of $2500

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 


MB Hydro – Generating Futures Scholarships

Area of Study:  Information Technology

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full time program

Amount:  Numerous awards of $10,000

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  www.hydro.mb.ca

 

 



General

 

Nunavut Beneficiaries Scholarships

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Nunavut Land Claims Agreement member enrolled or accepted as a full-time student and maintain a 60% average

Amount:  $1750

Application Deadline:  September 1

Information:  www.nitc.ca

 


Foundation for the Advancement of Aboriginal Youth (FAAY)

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full-time program

Amount:  Numerous awards of various amounts

Application Deadline:  October 12

Information:  www.ccab.com

 


Hanna (Nancy) Boon Bursary

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in full-time studies who demonstrate satisfactory academic process and financial need

Amount:  $500

Application Deadline:  January 31

Information:  Red River College Student Awards Office

 


Fly Higher – Business Council of Manitoba

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled or plan to enroll in a full-time program, who have been a Manitoba resident for the last 12 months and require financial assistance

Amount:  Numerous awards of $1500

Application Deadline:  March 30

Information:  www.businesscouncilmb.ca

 


Helen Betty Osborne Memorial Foundation

Area of Study:  Any area of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a full-time program

Amount:  Numerous awards of approximately $1000

Application Deadline:  August 31

Information:  www.helenbettyosbornefdtn.ca

 


National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (NAAF)
Area of Study:  Business, Science, Engineering, Information Technology and Technical Studies

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in a eligible program with minimum two year duration

Amount:  Numerous awards; no set value

Application Deadline:  June 1

Information:  www.naaf.ca

 


Canada Post Aboriginal Education

Area of Study:  Any are of post secondary study, including vocational or trades

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students who have returned to school after prolonged absence and have completed one year of post secondary education

Amount:  $1000

Application Deadline:  July 31

Information:  www.canadapost.ca

 


Prince of Wales/Princess of Anne Bursary

Area of Study:  Any are of post secondary study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students

Amount:  $200 per year

Application Deadline:  Two months prior to program completion

Information:  www.studentaid.gov.mb.ca

 


RBC Aboriginal Students Awards Program

Area of Study:  Any area of study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students enrolled in or accepted into a full-time program

Amount:  Ten awards of up to $4000

Application Deadline:  February 28

Information:  www.rbc.com/careers/aboriginal_student_awards.html

 


Building Foundation Bursary

Area of Study:  Any area of study

Eligibility:  Aboriginal students living in subsidized rental units in Manitoba or receiving rental subsidy funded by Manitoba Housing and taking a college program of minimum 1 year in length

Amount:  Minimum 2 awards of $1000 each

Application Deadline:  September 30

Information:  www.manitoba.ca/housing

 


Mary Guilbault Métis Bursary

Area of Study:  Any area of study

Eligibility:  Métis students who are involved in their community and show financial need

Amount:  TBD

Application Deadline:  October 1

Information:  Louis Riel Institute – Ph. (204) 984-9480 Email. lri@mmf.ca

 



Native Studies

Heroes of Our Time –Tommy Prince Award

Area of Study:  Aboriginal Self Government Administration, Aboriginal Language Specialist

Eligibility:  First Nation students enrolled in a full time program of study

Amount:  $2000

Application Deadline:  June 21

Information:  www.afn.ca

 

Sault College

Sault College:

Tommy Prince - WWII & Korean War Native Veteran Scholarship

Anishnaabe Student Achievement Award - Native Community Worker Program Scholarship

Anishnaabe Student Achievement Award - Native Community Worker Program Scholarship

The Metis Nation of Ontario Bursary

Robert Monstas Memorial Scholarship

Hazel McBride - Kane Memorial Scholarship

First Nation Nursing Scholarship

Sault College Registrar's Office
443 Northern Avenue
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
P6A 5L3

1-800-461-2260
Web: www.saultcollege.ca


Tommy Prince - WWII & Korean War Native Veteran Scholarship

Eligibility: Sgt. Tommy Price, from Brokenhead Band in Scanterbury, Manitoba, received the highest military decorations for bravery, the Silver Star and the Military Medal. He served in the elite "Devil's Brigade" for the duration of the War, then reenlisted in the Korean War years later. Tommy wore the mantle of his grandfather, Peguis, the famous Saulteaux Chief.


Anishnaabe Student Achievement Award - Native Community Worker Program Scholarship

Eligibility: Offered to students who have completed their first year of the Native Community Worker program. Recipients are chosen based on excellent academic standing in the first year of the program.

Anishnaabe Student Achievement Award - Native Community Worker Program Scholarship

Eligibility: Sponsored by the Native Community Worker Program faculty, this award is available to second year students demonstrating the qualities of a positive role model including professionalism, commitment and excellent academics.

The Metis Nation of Ontario Bursary

Eligibility: Students are awarded funds to assist them with the costs of their on-going post-secondary education.
Robert Monstas Memorial Scholarship

Eligibility: This award is sponsored by friends, family and staff of Sault College. Bob Monstas was a returning adult student who carried a full-time academic load and worked tirelessly in the Learning Centre.
Hazel McBride-Kane Memorial Scholarship

Eligibility: Dedicated to the memory of Hazel McBride-Kane, professor in the Native Education Department from 1991 - 1995.


First Nation Nursing Scholarship

Eligibility: This award is sponsored by Marie Price. The recipient of this award is chosen based on academics and clinical performance.

Sault College Registrar's Office
443 Northern Avenue
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
P6A 5L3

1-800-461-2260
Web: www.saultcollege.ca

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT)

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT)

Karen Drummond
Awards and Partnerships Coordinator
SAIT Alumni Relations & Student Awards
MA113 Heritage Hall
1301 - 16 Avenue N.W.
Calgary, AB T2M 0L4
Phone: (403) 284-8858
Fax: (403) 284-8394

E-mail: karen.drummond@sait.ca
Web: sait.ca/pages/alumni/awards/studentawards/

 


Eric Harvie Memorial Awards - SAIT

Application deadline Nov. 30

One annual award of $1,000

For first or second year full-time students

Must be Native/Aboriginal (status, non-status, Metis or Inuit)

Based on academic merit, financial need and demonstrated interest in preserving traditional Native culture

For students enrolled at SAIT only!


Talisman Energy Award - SAIT

Deadline: December 30

One annual award of $2,000

Applicant must be Native/Aboriginal, enrolled full-time in earth sciences, business, commerce or economics program

May be in first or second year of diploma or applied degree program

Based on financial need and academic standing

Please be advised that Talisman also offers a $2,000 Aboriginal Bursary at Mount Royal College with the same terms of reference as above.

Talisman also offers $2,000 general bursaries at Mount Royal College (in addition to the Aboriginal Bursary), SAIT (in addition to the Aboriginal Bursary), University of Alberta, University of Calgary, University of British Columbia, University of Saskatchewan and the Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Please contact individual schools for application forms.


CJAY 92 Standard Radio Award - SAIT

Application deadline July 15

One annual award of $2,200

For Aboriginal students entering the CTSR radio option

Based on results of an interview, research paper, resume and participation in an informal session

For students enrolled at SAIT only!


Enviro-Tech Services Ltd. - SAIT

Deadline: September 30

One annual award of $2,200

For Native students enrolled in first or second year Surveying & Mapping Technology, Engineering Design & Drafting Technology, Civil Engineering Technology

Based on academic achievement and demonstrated interest in the field

For students enrolled at SAIT only!

Karen Drummond
Awards and Partnerships Coordinator
SAIT Alumni Relations & Student Awards
MA113 Heritage Hall
1301 - 16 Avenue N.W.
Calgary, AB T2M 0L4
Phone: (403) 284-8858
Fax: (403) 284-8394

E-mail: karen.drummond@sait.ca
Web: sait.ca/pages/alumni/awards/studentawards/

University of Alberta

University of Alberta:

Adrian Hope Awards

Billy Mills Award

Chief Harvey Behn Bursary

Darcy Tailfeathers Award

Harry A. and Francis Lepofsky Friedman Scholarship

Johnny Samson Prize

Ralph and Isabel Steinhauer Scholarship

Saddle Lake Steinhauer Entrance Scholarship

Shell Canada Limited Aboriginal Science Award

Shell Canada Limited Aboriginal Engineering Award

Stan Daniels Award

Tkachenko Prize

Tom Wegmann Award

John Baldwin Visual Communications Award

Canadian Western Bank Entrance Award

Canadian Western Bank Transfer Award

Information:
Office of Student Awards
University of Alberta
103 Administration Building
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M7
Phone: (780) 492-3221
Fax: (780) 492-4380


Aboriginal Student Services Centre (ASSC)
Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries
University of Alberta

APPLICATION DEADLINE: OCTOBER 15, 2013

KEN AND BETTIE DITZLER AWARD FOR ABORIGINAL STUDENTS
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $1,000
Conditions: Awarded to a student of Aboriginal descent (as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35(2), or a person accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community) with satisfactory academic standing continuing in an undergraduate degree at the University of Alberta. Selection based on demonstrated involvement in the preservation of traditional Aboriginal culture and/or leadership within an Aboriginal community.
Donor: Endowed by Ken (BSc Agriculture 1960) and Bettie (BSc Home Economics 1962) Ditzler


SUSAN AGLUKARK AWARD
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $1,000
Conditions: Awarded to a student of Aboriginal descent, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35 (2) or a person accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community, who is entering the University of Alberta from high school with satisfactory academic standing. Selection based on demonstrated interest in the preservation of traditional Aboriginal culture and/or demonstrated leadership within an Aboriginal community. Preference given to an Inuit student with demonstrated interest in environmental issues.
Donor: Multiple donors


HARRY A AND FRANCES LEPOFSKY FRIEDMAN AWARD
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $3,000
Conditions: Awarded to a student of Aboriginal descent, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35(2) or a person accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community, who is entering the University of Alberta from high school on the basis of satisfactory academic achievement (70% or better).
Donor: Endowed by Ruth Bernice Friedman, daughter of Harry A. Frances Lepofsky Friedman.


DOROTHY LESLIE MEMORIAL AWARD
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $2,000
Conditions: To be awarded annually to a University of Alberta student with satisfactory academic standing who is of Aboriginal descent as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35(2) or persons accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community. Selection will be made on the basis of academic standing.
Donor: Endowed through the Estate of Dorothy Leslie


SADDLE LAKE STEINHAUER ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIP
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $2,000
Conditions: Awarded to a student with superior academic achievement entering the first year of an undergraduate degree program. Recipient will be selected on the basis of demonstrated community service with or among Aboriginal peoples. Preference will be given to Aboriginal students.
Donor: Endowed Anonymously


RALPH AND ISABEL STEINHAUER SCHOLARSHIP
Field of Study: Agriculture and Forestry, Home Economics, Agricultural Engineering or Animal
Science
Awards Available: 1 @ $2,000
Conditions: Awarded to an Aboriginal student with superior academic achievement entering the first year at the University of Alberta on the basis of superior academic achievement and financial need.
Donor: Endowed by the Steinhauer family


THE BARBERA NIELSEN DE LUNA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: Variable @ variable to a max of $500
Conditions: Awarded to students with superior academic achievement who are enrolled in an undergraduate degree program who are of Aboriginal descent as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35(2) or are accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as members of their community. Recipients will be selected on the basis of academic achievement.
Donor: Former Chief Harvey Behn


CYRIL HERBERT TOBIAS BURSARY
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: Variable @ variable to a max of $2,000
Conditions: Awarded to Alberta, Manitoba, and/or Saskatchewan residents with satisfactory academic standing entering or enrolled in the second, third of fourth year of an undergraduate degree program who are of Aboriginal decent as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35(2) or persons accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community. Recipients will be selected on the basis of demonstrated financial need and academic standing.
Donor: Endowed by the Estate of Cyril Herbert Tobias


The Metis Elder Marge Friedel
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $500
Conditions: Awarded to a full-time student of Metis ancestry with satisfactory academic standing continuing in an undergraduate degree. Selection based on academic standing. Primary preference given to a graduate of Amiskwaciy Academy, and secondary preference given to a student with demonstrated involvement in First Nation, Metis and/or Inuit (FNMI) university and/or community events.


The RBC / Royal Eagle Award for Aboriginal Students
Field of Study: Open
Awards Available: 1 @ $1,000
Conditions: Awarded to a student of Aboriginal descent, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, Section 35 (2), or a person accepted by one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada as a member of their community, who is completing a University of Alberta degree with satisfactory academic standing. Selection based on academic standing. Preference given to a student with demonstrated interest in the preservation of traditional Aboriginal culture and/or demonstrated leadership within an Aboriginal community.
Donor: RBC Foundation

 

For the above awards, tudents can contact :

Tricia Beaudry - Aboriginal Student Advisor
Aboriginal Student Services Centre
University of Alberta
2-400 Students' Union Building
Edmonton, AB T6G 2J7
Phone: (780) 492-5677
Email: tbeaudry@ualberta.ca


University of Alberta invites Undergraduate Academic Scholarships

Candidates must have achieved first class standing (7.5 GPA) on a full normal course load (eg.30 course weight) taken at the U of A during the previous academic year (Sept - April) or equivalent of full course lad by end of Spring/Summer 2001. Must be continuing in an undergraduate or professional program at University of Alberta in September 2001.

For application or more information visit: www.registrar.ualberta.ca.


Tom Wegmann Award - University of Alberta

Award: $750

Deadline: Nomination by U of A Aboriginal Health Careers program.

Eligibility: Awarded annually to a student enrolled in the Native Medicine Program at the University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine, on the basis of satisfactory academic standing and a demonstrated interest in native health care.


Chief Harvey Behn Bursary - University of Alberta

Award: $500

Deadline: October 31

Eligibility: Applicant of Aboriginal heritage entering their second, third or fourth year in Faculty of Engineering. Must be involved in the Native community and have financial need. Alternately, students in Faculty of Science may be considered.


Shell Canada Limited Aboriginal Science Award - University of Alberta

Award: $2,000

Deadline: October 1

Eligibility: Student of Canadian Aboriginal ancestry entering third or fourth year of a Bachelor degree majoring in Physics, Geophysics, Electrical Engineering, or Geology. Satisfactory academic standing of 6.0. Preference given to students interested in a career in the oil and gas industry.


Shell Canada Limited Aboriginal Engineering Award - University of Alberta

Award: $2,000

Deadline: October 1, 2000

Eligibility: University of Alberta Aboriginal student with academic standing of 6.0 entering third or fourth year of a BSc degree, or to a student in an MEng or MSc degree program in the Faculty of Engineering majoring in Chemical, Mechanical or Civil engineering. Based on financial need, academic standing, and involvement in extracurricular activities.


Adrian Hope Awards in Cree Language and Culture - University of Alberta

Awarded annually to a student with outstanding academic achievement in Advanced
Cree 352 and a student with outstanding academic achievement in Native Issues and
Insights 210/211.

Amount: Two awards of $500 each

Eligibility: Outstanding academic achievement in one of the above courses.
Duration: N/A.
Application

Deadline: Application not required


Billy Mills Award - University of Alberta

To a graduate or senior undergraduate Aboriginal student in the preparation of a
thesis or major paper.

Amount: $500

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry. Academic achievement. Documented involvement in the Aboriginal community. Students from all faculties are eligible.

Duration: N/A.

Deadline: April 15 each year


Darcy Tailfeathers Memorial Award in Medicine - University of Alberta

To a student of Aboriginal ancestry who has shown commitment to pursuing a
career in medicine.

Amount: $1,000

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry.
Has completed at least one year of the M.D. program with satisfactory academic
standing. Emphasis on leadership qualities and athletic ability.

Duration: N/A.

Deadline: By nomination of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Alberta.


Harry A. and Francis Lepofsky Friedman Scholarship - University of Alberta

Description: To an Aboriginal student entering the University of Alberta.
Amount: Varies each year.
Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry.
Superior academic achievement.
Community involvement.
Duration: N/A.

Deadline: April 15 each year


Johnny Samson Prize in Native Studies - University of Alberta

Offered annually to a student demonstrating superior achievement in two or more
courses at the School of Native Studies.

Amount: $750

Eligibility: Entering second, third or fourth year of an academic program.
Superior academic achievement in at least two courses of the School for Native Studies. Financial need. Extra-curricular involvement.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: April 1 each year


Ralph and Isabel Steinhauer Scholarship - University of Alberta

Awarded to an Aboriginal student entering the University of Alberta.

Amount: $500 and up to $1,900

Eligibility: Aboriginal student beginning studies in one of the following faculties:
. Agriculture and Forestry
. Home Economics
. Agricultural Engineering
. Animal Science.
Superior academic achievement.
Financial need.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: July 15 each year


Saddle Lake Steinhauer Entrance Scholarship - University of Alberta

To a student entering the first year of any undergraduate program at the University
of Alberta.

Amount: $1,000

Eligibility: Superior academic achievement.
Good record of community service with or among Aboriginal people.
Preference will be given to Aboriginal students.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: April 15 each year


Stan Daniels Award - University of Alberta

Métis student attending the University of Alberta

Amount: One award of $500

Eligibility: Métis student. Financial need. Good academic performance.
Active participation in Métis community affairs and activities.

Duration: N/A.

Deadline: April 15 each year


Tkachenko Prize in Native Studies - University of Alberta

For study of the Cree language.

Amount: One award of $500 in each of two Cree language courses at the University of
Alberta.

Eligibility: Highest academic standing in Introductory Cree NS 152 and highest academic
standing in Intermediate Cree NS252.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: April 1 each year


John Baldwin Visual Communications Memorial Award - University of Alberta

To reward an Aboriginal student enrolled in a Bachelor.s in Applied Arts and Design or in Design who has demonstrated originality in visual communications concepts.

Amount: $200

Eligibility: Aboriginal ancestry.
Duration: N/A

Deadline: Application not required. Nomination by the Faculty of Art and Design.


Canadian Western Bank Entrance Award - University of Alberta

Amount: $6,000 (payable over 3 years)

Deadline: October 1

Conditions: University of Alberta student of Canadian Aboriginal ancestry entering first year of Faculty of business. Based on academic merit and financial need.


Canadian Western Bank Entrance / Transfer Award - University of Alberta

Amount: $4,000 (payable over two years)

Deadline: October 1

Conditions: University of Alberta student of Canadian Aboriginal ancestry transferring into the faculty of business after completing two years at a local or regional college. Based on academic merit and financial need.

Information:
Office of Student Awards
University of Alberta
103 Administration Building
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M7
Phone: (780) 492-3221
Fax: (780) 492-4380

University of British Columbia

 

University of British Columbia:

BC Tel Native/Indian Teacher Education Program

Cannon Memorial Bursary

Dofasco Inc. First Nations Fellowship

Dr. Gordon Butler Bursary

Jessie Manning Bursary

Mary and James Fyfe-Smith Memorial Bursary

Clarence Ludwig Musclow Bursary

Native Brotherhood Jubilee Scholarship

St. Philip's Anglican Church Bursary

Westcoast Energe Inc. First Nations Fellowship

Wilson Duff Memorial Bursary

Khot-la-cha Award

Michael and Sonja Koerner Fellowship

Gene Joseph Scholarship

Verna J. Kirkness (Ni-jing-jada) Award

Information: Awards and Financial Aid Office
University of British Columbia
Brock Hall, 1875 East Mall, Office 1036
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1
Phone: (604) 822-5111
Fax: (604) 822-6929

Value: $ 9000.00

Number: One

Eligibility: Available to UBC Graduate student(s) ... Preference given to students of
Commerce and Business Administration.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: N/A.


Gene Joseph Scholarship - University of British Columbia

Value: $ 1900.00

Number: One

Eligibility: Given to student(s) in the UBC School of Library, Archival, and
Information Studies.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: N/A.


Verna J. Kirkness (Ni-jing-jada) Award - University of British Columbia

Value: $ 1700.00

Number: One

Eligibility: Award is made on the recommendation of the First Nations House Of Learning and Faculty of Education and, in the case of graduate students, the Facul;ty of Graduate Studies. Preference is given to student(s) involved in academic projects or research that will advance the cause of Aboriginal education.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: N/A.


Khot-la-cha Award - University of British Columbia

Eligibility: Awarded is made on the recommendation of the First
Nations House of Learning, and in the case of graduate students, in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Offered to First Nations
students working with or guided by First Nations Elders in their studies.


BC Tel Native/Indian Teacher Education Program- University of British Columbia

To assist Native students in the NITEP program at the University of British
Columbia. Awarded in consultation with the Faculty of Education.

Value: Bursaries to a total of $3,250

Eligibility: Status or Non-Status Indian.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: N/A.


Cannon Memorial Bursary - University of British Columbia

To Native students enrolled in the Faculty of Education.

Value: One or more annual bursaries to a total of $675, normally not less than $250 each.

Eligibility: Status or Non-Status Indian. Has completed at least one undergraduate year. Good academic standing.Financial need.


Dofasco Inc. First Nations Fellowship - University of British Columbia

Two fellowships endowed by Dofasco Inc. With the support of the Province of
British Columbia for First Nations students in any field.

Value: Two fellowships of $8,000 each

Eligibility: First Nations student at the University of British Columbia.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: Awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.


Dr. Gordon Butler Memorial Bursary - University of British Columbia

To Status Indians, Non-Status Indians or Inuit who are enrolled in or currently
majoring in health and social sciences at the University of British Columbia.

Value: Normally two bursaries of $500 each

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian or Inuit.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: N/A


Jessie Manning Bursary for Native/Indian Students - University of British Columbia

To assist Native students.

Value: One bursary of $1,050

Eligibility: Preference is given to a Non-Status Indian in the Native Indian Teacher Education
program.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: N/A


Mary and James Fyfe-Smith Memorial Bursary - University of British Columbia

To Native students entering or attending the School of Social Work or Nursing, theFaculty of Education or the Faculty of Law.

Value: One bursary of $1,500 to each of the three faculties listed above.

Eligibility: Native student.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: N/A


Clarence Ludwig Musclow Bursary - University of British Columbia

This bursary has been endowed by the estate of Clarence Ludwig Musclow for a First Nations student from British Columbia.

Value: $3,000

Eligibility: First Nation student from British Columbia.
Must be studying First Nations culture, history, language or any other topic which
will help to preserve the culture of First Nations people.

Duration: N/A

Deadline: N/A


Native Brotherhood of British Columbia Jubilee Scholarship - University of British Columbia

To a First Nations student from a British Columbia coastal community.

Value: One scholarship of $800.

Eligibility: First Nations student from a coastal community.
Enrolled in an arts or science faculty at the University of British Columbia.
Duration: N/A

Deadline: N/A


St. Philip's Anglican Church Bursary - University of British Columbia

To assist Native students.

Value: One or more bursaries to a total of $1,000

Eligibility: Preference given to a Non-Status Indian.


Westcoast Energe Inc. First Nations Fellowship - University of British Columbia

To First Nations students in any field on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.

Value: Two fellowships of $6,000 per year.

Eligibility: First Nations student.
Enrolled at the University of British Columbia.


Wilson Duff Memorial Bursary - University of British Columbia

To students in the field of Native history and culture.

Value: One or more bursaries of $1,500

Eligibility: Studying Indian history and culture. Preference given to students of Native ancestry.

Information: Awards and Financial Aid Office
University of British Columbia
Brock Hall, 1875 East Mall, Office 1036
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1
Phone: (604) 822-5111
Fax: (604) 822-6929

University of Calgary

University of Calgary:

Royal and Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada Scholarships

New Sun Education Award

Raytheon Systems of Canada Ltd. Scholarship

Ross A. MacKimmie Bursary

S.M. Blair Family Foundation Scholarship

Roland MacDonald Memorial Award

Sheila McDougall Award

Travel Cuts Native Bursary

Madam Valda Bursaries

Ellen McNail Hamilton Bursary

Hughes Aircraft of Canada Limited Scholarship For Aboriginal Students

I.C. Hutton Bursary

Information: Student Awards and Financial Aid
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: (403) 220-6925
Fax: (403) 284-0069

Web: www.ucalgary.ca/nativecr/awards


Royal and Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada Scholarships for Aboriginal Students - University of Calgary

Value: One scholarship of $1,000.

Eligibility: Offered annually to a student of Native Canadian ancestry (Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit) who is entering his or her third or fourth year in the Faculty of Management with a concentration in risk management and insurance. The award is based on academic merit. In the event there are no eligible applicants in the RMIN program, students of Native Canadian ancestry registered in third or fourth year of other programs are eligible.

Deadline: June 15


New Sun Education Award - University of Calgary

Value: One scholarship of $1,500.

Eligibility: Offered annually to a continuing student of Native Canadian ancestry (Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit)who has completed at least one full year in any undergraduate faculty at the University of Calgary. The award is based on academic merit, financial need and a demonstrated involvement in he preservation
of traditional Native culture. To be eligible students must be registered full-time, but need not be carrying a full course load.

Deadline: June 15


Raytheon Systems of Canada Ltd. Scholarship for Aboriginal Students - University of Calgary

Value: One scholarship of $1,000.

Eligibility: Offered annually to a student of Native Canadian ancestry (Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit) entering he hird year at he University of
Calgary in either electrical engineering or computer science.The award is based on academic merit. In the event there are no eligible applicants in electrical
engineering or computer science, Aboriginal students enrolled in he following disciplines are considered in the order listed: engineering (any department),
mathematics, physics,or any undergraduate faculty at the University of Calgary.

Deadline: June 15


The Ross A. MacKimmie Bursary - University of Calgary

To a student of Native Canadian ancestry entering first year in any faculty at the
University of Calgary. North Canadian Oils Limited in memory of Ross
MacKimmie.

Amount: One bursary of $1,000

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit.
Academic merit. Financial need. Entering first year in any faculty.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: July 15 each year


S.M. Blair Family Foundation Scholarship - University of Calgary

Offered to a student of Native Canadian ancestry entering the Faculty of
Engineering at the University of Calgary. Donated by the S.M. Blair Family
Foundation.

Amount: $3,000

Renewable in the second, third and fourth year providing the recipient maintains a minimum grade point average of 2.60 as a full-time student.

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit.
Entering the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Calgary.
Must have attended high school in one of the western Canadian provinces, the
Yukon or the Northwest Territories. Academic merit. Extra-curricular activities involving contribution to the Native community.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: March 15 each year


The Roland MacDonald Memorial Award - University of Calgary

Offered to a student of Native Canadian ancestry enrolled in second, third or fourth year at the University of Calgary. Donated by Frederick R. MacDonald in memory of his brother Roland.

Amount: One award of $800

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit.
Enrolled in second, third or fourth year at the University of Calgary.
Financial need. Academic merit. Preference will be given to a student enrolled in the Faculty of Fine Arts. Must be enrolled in full-time studies but need not be carrying a full course load.
Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 15 each year


The Sheila McDougall Award - University of Calgary

Offered to an Aboriginal Canadian registered in the Faculty of Social Work in the BSW program. Donated by family, friends and colleagues in memory of Sheila McDougall, who received her BSW from the University of Calgary in 1987 and was working on her MSW at the time of her death.

Amount: $200

Eligibility: Aboriginal Canadian registered in the Faculty of Social Work in the BSW program. If there are no suitable applicants in the Faculty of Social Work, then students who meet the criteria specified but are registered in the Faculty of Education, the Faculty of Nursing or the Faculty of Social Sciences with a major in psychology will be considered. Academic merit. Intent to pursue a career in an area that will provide a service to Native people and/or further cross-cultural awareness and understanding. Financial need.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 15 each year


The Travel Cuts Native Bursary - University of Calgary

To a Canadian student of Native ancestry enrolled in second, third or fourth year of any faculty at the University of Calgary.

Amount: One award of $500.
Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit.
Academic merit. Financial need.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 15 each year


The Madam Valda Bursaries - University of Calgary

Offered to students entering second, third or fourth year of any faculty at the University of Calgary. Donated by the estate of the late Olga Valda Kavaner.

Amount: Three bursaries of $1,000 each.
Eligibility: The awards will be based primarily on financial need with academic merit also considered. Preference will be given to a student of Native Canadian ancestry (Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit) for one of these awards.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 15 each year.


Ellen McNail Hamilton Bursary - University of Calgary

Offered to a student of Native Canadian ancestry enrolled in second, third or fourth year of any faculty at the University of Calgary. Donated by Jessie Symons in memory of her mother Ellen McNeil Hamilton.

Amount: Three bursaries of $2,000 each

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit.
Financial need. Extra-curricular activities. Academic merit.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 15 each year.


Hughes Aircraft of Canada Limited Scholarship For Aboriginal Students - University of Calgary

Offered to a student of Native Canadian ancestry entering third year at the
University of Calgary in either electrical engineering or computer science.

Amount: One scholarship of $1,000

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis, or Inuit.
Entering third year in electrical engineering or computer science.
Academic merit. In the event that there are no eligible applicants in electrical engineering or computer science then Aboriginal students enrolled in the following disciplines will be considered in the order listed:
. Engineering (any department)
. Mathematics
. Physics
. Any undergraduate faculty at the University of Calgary.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 15 each year


The I.C. Hutton Bursary - University of Calgary

Offered to students of Native Canadian ancestry enrolled in second, third or fourth year of any faculty at the University of Calgary. Donated by I.C. Hutton in memory of her parents, Robert W. And Mary C. Hutton.

Amount: Two bursaries of $1,000.

Eligibility: Status Indian, Non-Status Indian, Métis or Inuit.
Academic merit. Financial need. Must be registered full-time but need not be carrying a full course load.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: June 15 each year

Information: Student Awards and Financial Aid
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: (403) 220-6925
Fax: (403) 284-0069

 

University of Lethbridge

Lethbridge University:

Peigan Nation Scholarship

Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship

Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Part-Time Studies in Native American Studies

Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Fine Arts

Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Part-Time Studies in Fine Arts

Shell Scholarship In Native Management

Imperial Oil Limited Scholarships

ATCO Gas Bursary in Business Enterprises and Self-Governing Systems

Vern Eagle Bear Memorial Scholarship

Information:
Scholarships and Student Finance
4401 University Drive
Lethbridge Alberta T1K 3M4
Phone: (403) 329-2585
Fax: (403) 382-7110



Peigan Nation Scholarship - University of Lethbridge

Value: One at $500

Eligibility: Preference to students who have at least second year standing. Must be a registered member of the Peigan Nation.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Financial need may be considered.

Deadline: May 31


Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - University of Lethbridge

Value: Two at $1,000

Eligibility: A Native student majoring in Native American Studies.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Financial need may be considered.

Deadline: May 31


Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Part-Time Studies in Native American Studies - University of Lethbridge

Value: One at $500

Eligibility: A Native student majoring in Native American Studies. A minimum of two and no more than 7.5 graded courses in the Fall and Spring semesters immediately preceding the granting of the award.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Financial need may be considered.

Deadline: May 31


Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Fine Arts - University of Lethbridge

Value: One at $2,000

Eligibility: A Native student majoring in Art.

Criteria: Academic and artistic achievement. Financial need may be considered.

Deadline: May 31


Lubov Alexandra de Grandmaison Scholarship - Part-Time Studies in Fine Arts - University of Lethbridge

Value: One at $5000

Eligibility: A Native student majoring in Art. A minimum of two and no more than 7.5 graded courses in the Fall and Spring semesters immediately preceding the granting of the award.

Criteria: Academic and artistic achievement. Financial need may be considered.

Deadline: May 31


Shell Scholarship In Native Management - University of Lethbridge

Value: Variable at $1,000

Eligibility: New and continuing students in the Faculty of Management Business Enterprises and Self-Governing Systems of Indian, Inuit and Metis People (B.E.S.S.) certificate or degree program.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Overall performance and commitment to the objectives of the Native Management program.

Deadline: Application not required.


Imperial Oil Limited Scholarships - University of Lethbridge

Value: Variable at $1,000

Eligibility: New and continuing students in the Faculty of Management (B.E.S.S.) certificate or degree program.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Overall performance and commitment to the objectives of the Native Management program.

Deadline: Application not required.


ATCO Gas Bursary in Business Enterprises and Self-Governing Systems - University of Lethbridge

Value: One at $250

Eligibility: New and continuing Aboriginal or Native students from within the Province of Alberta in the Faculty of Management (B.E.S.S.) certificate or degree program.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Extra-curricular contributions to campus or community. Financial need.

Deadline: Application not required.


Vern Eagle Bear Memorial Scholarship - University of Lethbridge

Value: One at $250

Eligibility: New and continuing students in the Faculty of Management (B.E.S.S.) certificate or degree program.

Criteria: Academic achievement. Overall performance and commitment to the objectives of the Native Management program.

Deadline: Application not required.

Information:
Scholarships and Student Finance
4401 University Drive
Lethbridge Alberta T1K 3M4
Phone: (403) 329-2585
Fax: (403) 382-7110

 

University of Manitoba

Scholarships and Bursaries at the University of Manitoba

The University of Manitoba offers a wide range of scholarships and bursaries for Aboriginal students.

By self-declaring as a person of Aboriginal descent you will automatically be eligible for a number of awards. Self-Declaration forms are available from the Aboriginal Student Centre, or you can check the box that applies to you on your University of Manitoba application form.

*Bursary awards are based primarily on financial need; students must submit the University of Manitoba Bursary Application.

*Academic scholarships will be automatically given to the students who meet the criteria. Specific applications are not required unless otherwise noted.

For more information on any awards, please contact:
Financial Aid & Awards
422 University Centre,
Ph: 474-9531, Fax: 474-7543
email: awards@umanitoba.ca
Visit: www.umanitoba.ca/student/awards

The following awards at the University of Manitoba are available to Aboriginal (First Nation, Status or Non-Status, Inuit, and Métis) students:

All Faculties at the University of Manitoba

Marguerite and John Burelle Memorial Aboriginal Scholarships
- four awards of $3,000

Mary and Louis Finkle Aboriginal and Immigrant Scholarship & Bursary
- $450 (per award) - application required

Sonia and Ralph Kaplan Aboriginal and Immigrant Scholarship & Bursary
- $450 (per award) - application required

Winston Samlalsingh Scholarship
- one renewable scholarship of $1,175 for the student entering the University of Manitoba from high school with highest average

Frances E. Ross Bursary
- $500 (estimated) available for a Métis student in any program

Louis Riel Bursaries at the University of Manitoba
- 84 awards at $1,500 for any student in any program who holds membership in the Manitoba Métis Federation

Louis Riel Bursary
- $150 (estimated) offered every two years to a student in any program

Honourable Mitchell W. Sharp Bursary
- $3,425 available for multiple awards for U1 students

Cyril Tobias Memorial Bursary
- $2,875 available for multiple awards for students in any program who are from Manitoba, Saskatchewan, or Alberta

Farm Credit Canada Scholarship
- one award of $1,500 for a student in either the I.H. Asper School of Business or the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences

Joan and Dean Sandham Scholarship in Aboriginal Health Professional Leadership
- $6700 available for multiple awards for medical doctors and nurses in any undergraduate or graduate program who demonstrate leadership skills and a commitment to developing a career in medicine or nursing

Johnston Bursary
- $5,200 available (variable numbers and values) for students in Law or Medicine

Centre for Aboriginal Health Education Student Support Fund
- $5,000 to offer multiple emergency bursaries ($50 to $500) to undergraduate students in Dentistry, Dental Hygiene, Medical Rehabilitation, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy

Wiciwawin Aboriginal Alumni Emergency Bursary

- $2,125 available for multiple awards for students in any program


School of Art

George Swinton Memorial Scholarships
- $750 for a student in the B.F.A.(Honours), B.F.A., or Dip. in Art


Architecture (Environmental Design)

Frank and Marjorie Silver Bursary
- $800 bursary for a student in Master of Architecture, City Planning, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture program

Allan Waisman Aboriginal Architecture Scholarship
- one award of $4,950 for a student in Master of Architecture, City Planning, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture Program


Asper School of Business

Aboriginal Business Education Program (ABEP) Awards
- multiple scholarships & bursaries of $500-$2,000 to ABEP students

North West Company Aboriginal Student Scholarship in Management
- one award of $1,125 for U1 student who intends to enter Management - must submit letter of intent

Vision Quest - Steve Prince Memorial Bursary
- $1,000 for a student in the I.H. Asper School of Business who has demonstrated community involvement

Linda K. Park Memorial Bursary
- two bookstore credits of $200 available for students in ABEP


Faculty of Architecture

Allan Waisman Aboriginal Architecture Scholarship
- one award of $4,000 for Master's student


Faculty of Education

Manitoba Association of School Superintendents Bursary
- one award of $600

Manitoba Teachers' Society Aboriginal Bursary in Education
- one award of $2,400
Faculty of Engineering

Engineering Access Program (ENGAP) Awards
- multiple scholarships based on grade point average and multiple bursaries from $500 - $2,500


Faculty of Graduate Studies

Right Honourable Brian Dickson Graduate Fellowship
- one award of $5,350 for Masters of Law student who is Aboriginal or whose focus is Aboriginal rights

Ph.D. Studies for Aboriginal Scholars (PSAS) Fund
- variable amount of $5,000-$20,000 for students in first four years of any Doctoral program

President's Graduate Scholarship for First Nations, Inuit, Métis Students
- *beginning in 2009-10 - for a student in first four years of any Doctoral program or first two years of any Masters program


Faculty of Human Ecology

Human Ecology Endowment Fund Scholarship for Aboriginal Students
- up to three scholarships (minimum value $1000)

Jean Goodwill - Jean Steckle Bursary in Human Ecology
- one award of $2,900 for student involved in Aboriginal community


Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management

NFL/Budweiser Recreation Services Aboriginal Student Development Award
- one award of $670


Faculty of Law

Michael and Joy Phelps Bursary
- one award of $1,000

Petro-Canada Manitoba Law Foundation Bursary
- one award of $1,675


Faculty of Medicine

Jack Armstrong Memorial Bursary
- $1475 for a student in the Faculty of Medicine

Victoria and J. Stuart Downey Entrance Scholarship in Medicine
- $4,050 total given to one undergraduate student entering the Faculty of Medicine
- $3,037 given upon admission to the Faculty of Medicine
- The remaining balance, $1,013, given in the summer if the student is admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Medicine program, in the Faculty of Medicine


Faculty of Social Work

Elizabeth Hill Scholarship
- $5,450 available for one or more awards

Esther Seidl Scholarship
- $4,875 available for one or more awards for graduate students in Social Work

MASW Affirmative Action Bursary
- three awards of $1,000

Margaret Mary Burns Award in Social Work (Scholarship)
- $16,425 available to offer scholarships for Masters and Doctoral students in Social Work

Margaret Mary Burns Award in Social Work (Bursary)
- $8,075 available to offer bursaries for pre-Masters and Masters students in Social Work



Awards Related to Aboriginal Studies (open to non-Aboriginal students)

Aboriginal Issues Press Scholarship

- variable number and value; for graduate students with research focus on Aboriginal Issues

James Gordon Fletcher PhD Fellowship
- one award of $16,000 for student researching Aboriginal communities and persons - submit application

D.A. Thompson, Q.C. Prize for Aboriginal Peoples and Land Claims

- one prize of $100 for student graduating from Law

D.A. Thompson, Q.C. Prize for Aboriginal Peoples and Law

- one prize of $100 for a student graduating from Law

Oakes-Riewe Aboriginal-Environmental Studies Research Award
- $10,750 to offer multiple awards of $500 to $5,000 for master's and Doctoral students conducting interdisciplinary environmental research within an Aboriginal context

George A. Schultz Bursary in North American Native History
- $2,000 for a Masters or Doctoral student in History whose research focus in North American Native History

External Awards Available for Aboriginal Students

Manitoba Hydro Bursaries in Business, Engineering and IT
- multiple awards ($1,500 to $2,500 each) plus offer of summer employment with Manitoba Hydro for students in Business, Engineering, Computer Science, and University 1 (with a focus on IT) October 1st application deadline

Manitoba Hydro Employment Equity Bursary
- multiple awards of $1,500 each, plus offer of summer employment with Manitoba Hydro for students entering first year Business, Engineering, or Computer Science who belong to an Employment Equity Designated Group (see website for definition)
October 1st application deadline.Visit Manitoba Hydro at www.hydro.mb.ca for applications and more information.

MB Business Council Bursary
- multiple awards of $3000 each for students who demonstrate financial need and are in good academic standing. March 30th application deadline.Visit Manitoba Business Council at www.businesscouncil.mb.ca for applications and more information.

For more information on any awards, please contact:
Financial Aid & Awards
422 University Centre,
Ph: 474-9531, Fax: 474-7543
email: awards@umanitoba.ca
Visit: www.umanitoba.ca/student/awards

University of Regina

University of Regina:

Aboriginal Student Awards

Northern Resident Awards

Female Student Awards

Students with Disabilities Awards

For complete information on any of the above scholarships please go directly to the University of Regina's web site: www.uregina.ca/awards/scholarships/


Aboriginal

* Aboriginal Kinesiology and Health Studies Award
* Barber, Dr Lloyd Scholarships
* Birks Family Foundation Bursary for the Aborginal Co-Operative Education Program and Employment Services **NEW**
* Blakeney, A.E. SaskTel Bursary
* Bosgoed, Gary Scholarship for Aboriginals in Engineering
* CIC Aboriginal Bursary
* Faculty of Business Administration Aboriginal Student Award
* Howe, The CD Mature Student Achievement Awards for Excellence
* Indigenous Peoples' Health Research Centre (IPHRC) Summer Undergraduate Research Awards 2006
* John Deere Foundation of Canada Award
* Lowery, Teal Scholarship
* Mike Jake Memorial Scholarship Fund
* Purcell, Gil Memorial Journalism Scholarship for Native Canadians
* Regina Chamber of Commerce Award
* Regina Research Park Aboriginal Scholarship
* SaskWater Scholarship
* Scholarship for Aboriginal Canadians
* Shoebridge, Jean Memorial Prize
* University of Regina Aboriginal Student Fine Arts Award **NEW**
* Wolstein, Dr Edward Award for Students of Aboriginal Ancestry
* Wood, Morley Memorial Scholarship for Aboriginal Female Students

For complete information on any of the above scholarships please go directly to the University of Regina's web site: www.uregina.ca/awards/scholarships/


Female

* Blakeney, A.E. SaskTel Bursary
* Brennan Office Plus Cougar Women's Basketball Athletic Award
* Brennan Office Plus Cougar Women's Hockey Athletic Award
* Canadian Federation of University Women-Regina Scholarship
* CIS Women's Hockey Championship Legacy Scholarship
* Communications, Energy, and Paper Workers Union of Canada - Non-Traditional Scholarships
* Coolidge, Shelley Cougar Women's Hockey Athletic Award
* Cougar Women's Basketball Athletic Award
* Cougar Women's Hockey Athletic Award
* Cougar Women's Soccer Athletic Award
* Cougar Women's Volleyball Athletic Award
* Cowin, Jack Basketball Athletic Award
* Fedoruk, Sylvia Scholarship
* Gavel, Robyn Mason Memorial Bursary
* Haughton, Willa Athletic Award
* Lorenzen, Professor Fyola Scholarship
* Morris, Helen Mary Award for Women in Engineering
* SaskWater Scholarship
* University of Regina Faculty Association Dr Sarah Shorten Memorial Scholarship
* University of Regina Women's Centre Bursary for Women
* Welwood, Muriel Scholarship for Women in Education
* Wickenheiser, Doug Cougar Women's Hockey Leadership Athletic Award
* Wood, Morley Memorial Scholarship for Aboriginal Female Students

For complete information on any of the above scholarships please go directly to the University of Regina's web site: www.uregina.ca/awards/scholarships/


Northern Resident

Part-time

* Alexander, Milnor Award for Women
* Blakely, Leonard & Winnifred Memorial Award
* Captive Audience Scholarship **NEW**
* Connell, FJ. Music Scholarship
* Couse, Keith Award in Human Justice
* Faculty of Social Work Legacy Bursary
* Family Life Saskatchewan Book Prize in Human Justice
* Gavel, Robyn Mason Memorial Bursary
* Grant, Shirley Memorial Award
* Justice & Corrections Prize
* Larsen, Corporal Ole R Memorial Scholarship
* Muir, Gloria Memorial Award
* O'Brien, Sister Ann Scholarship
* Shaw, Elmer Part-Time Bursaries
* Shoebridge, Jean Memorial Prize
* University of Regina Alumni Association Dr John Archer Scholarship
* University of Regina Part-Time Studies Undergraduate Bursary **NEW**
* Usick, Garth Edward Memorial Bursary

For complete information on any of the above scholarships please go directly to the University of Regina's web site: www.uregina.ca/awards/scholarships/


Disability

* 35 Lions Club of Regina Scholarship
* Blakeney, A.E. SaskTel Bursary
* Epilepsy Scholarship Awards 2006
* Fox, Terry Memorial Scholarship
* Ottley, Jim & Elizabeth Award
* SaskWater Scholarship
* Teale, Lottie V.M. Bursary
* Teale, Lottie V.M. Scholarships
* University of Regina Celebration Award
* Usick, Garth Edward Memorial Bursary

For complete information on any of the above scholarships please go directly to the University of Regina's web site: www.uregina.ca/awards/scholarships/


City of Regina - Henry Baker Scholarships

The City of Regina offers six scholarships to students at the University of Regina including one at SIFC in Regina

Value: 2 @ $1000 and 4 @ $2,000

Eligibility: Varies

Deadline: August 1st

Information:
Phone: (306) 777-7800

Application form: www.cityregina.com

Return completed application to:
City of Regina
Public Affairs Division
City Hall, 14 th Floor
P. O. Box 1790
Regina, SK S4P 3C8

University of Saskatchewan

University of Saskatchewan

Information: Scholarships and Awards
Office of the Registrar
University of Saskatchewan
105 Administration Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A2
Phone: (306) 966-6748
Fax: (306) 966-6730
E-mail: awards@usask.ca
Internet: www.students.usask.ca/aboriginal/

 

Pre-Medicine Awards for Aboriginal Students

Chase Memorial Scholarship

Louis Riel Scholarship

Aurora Awards

Gordon McCormack Memorial Scholarship

Harvey Bell Memorial Prize

Roger Carter Scholarships

Henry Favel Scholarship

Diana Leis Bursary

Siberman Filer Bursary

TD Bursary Program

Nexen Awards for Aboriginal Students

Entering Awards - Business Economics

Continuing Awards - Business Economics

Entering Awards in Land Use and Environmental Studies (LUESt) or Environmental Earth Sciences (EES)

Continuing Awards in LUESt or EES:


Pre-Medicine Awards for Aboriginal Students - University of Saskatchewan

Value: $2500

Number: Varies

Deadline: August 15th

Eligibility: Students of Aboriginal ancestry who are entering or continuing full-time studies in the College of Arts & Science, pursuing pre-medical studies. Students must be Saskatchewan residents.
First-year recipients will be eligible to have their award renewed for a second year.

Selection: Academic achievement and biographical essay

Information:
Heather Mandeville, Administrative Coordinator
Admissions and Student Affairs
College of Medicine
Room A204 Health Sciences Building
107 Wiggins Road
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5
Phone: (306) 966-6143
Fax: (306) 966-2601

Email: heather.mandeville@usask.ca
Internet: www.medicine.usask.ca/specialprograms/aboriginal


Chase Memorial Scholarship - University of Saskatchewan

Provided to Aboriginal students of North American ancestry to assist with
registration at the University to pursue undergraduate studies.

Value: Seven scholarships of $1,500

Eligibility: North American Aboriginal ancestry and resident of Saskatchewan.
Financial need.

Duration: Annual (renewable)

Deadline: April 15 of each year for new students. June 01 of each year for undergraduate students.


Louis Riel Scholarship - University of Saskatchewan

Assists an Aboriginal student of Métis ancestry to obtain a university degree.

Value: One scholarship of $1,500

Eligibility: Saskatchewan or Manitoba Métis.Preference given to students entering their first year of university. Academic achievement.

Duration: One of the four years of a Bachelor.s degree.

Deadline: April 15 for students completing high school. June 1 for undergraduate students.


Aurora Awards - University of Saskatchewan

Offered to students of Native ancestry graduating from the Indian Teacher
Education Program.

Value: $500; number of awards varies.

Eligibility: Academic achievement. Aptitude for teaching.
Integrity and an enquiring mind. Pride in being a graduate of the Indian Teacher Education Program.

Duration: Annual.

Deadline: No application required. Award winners will be selected in consultation with the Director of Indian Teacher Education Program.
     


Gordon McCormack Memorial Scholarship for Native Students - University of Saskatchewan
Offered to a student entering the third year in the Indian Teacher Education
Program.

Value: One award of $500

Eligibility: Academic achievement. Native student entering third year in the Indian Teacher Education Program.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: September 30 each year. Applications must be submitted to the Assistant Dean (Student Affairs), College of Education.


Harvey Bell Memorial Prize - University of Saskatchewan

Offered to a student of Native Canadian ancestry receiving an LL.B degree in
Canada.

Value: Total of $1,200 available, number awarded varies

Eligibility: Native Canadian ancestry. Must be receiving an LL.B degree in Canada.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: May 31 each year

Information: The Director
Native Law Centre
Diefenbaker Centre
University of Saskatchewan
101 Diefenbaker Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7B 5B8


Roger Carter Scholarships - University of Saskatchewan

Offered to students of Native Canadian ancestry entering the second or third year of studies in a Canadian law school.

Value: To be determined

Eligibility: Native Canadian ancestry, entering second or third year of studies in a Canadian law school Academic achievement in law studies. The students. past and expected contribution to further the needs, concerns and aspirations of Native people and their communities in Canada.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: No application required


Henry Favel Scholarship - University of Saskatchewan

Offered to a full-time student of Treaty Indian ancestry who has successfully
completed a year of undergraduate study as a full-time student in the diploma or
degree program in agriculture.

Value: One award of $2,000

Eligibility: Academic achievement, persistent effort and overall academic progress of the student. To be eligible the student must return as a full-time student for a minimum of one term. Full-time student of Treaty Indian ancestry.
Must be in the diploma or degree program in agriculture.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: No application required


Diana Leis Bursary - University of Saskatchewan

Open to Aboriginal students who are residents of northern Saskatchewan and who have graduated with the previous five years with complete secondary-level standing from specified school divisions.

Value: One award of $800

Eligibility: Aboriginal student must have graduated within the previous five years with complete secondary-level standing from one of the following school divisions:
. Northern Lights School Division No.113
. Île à la Crosse School Division No.112
. Creighton School Division No.111.
Students must have completed at least one year of study in any degree program
offered by the University of Saskatchewan and must intend to return to northern
Saskatchewan on graduation. Academic achievement. Financial need.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: June 1 each year

On General Application for Undergraduate Awards available from the Office of the Registrar. Submit to the Office of the Registrar, together with a written statement of intention to return to northern Saskatchewan on graduation.


Siberman Filer Bursary - University of Saskatchewan

To assist eligible students with the opportunity to pursue studies in the College of Law, and ultimately to serve their community and country, thereby enriching life for many others.

Value: One award of $600

Eligibility: Student who has successfully completed the program of legal studies for Native people and is registered in the first year of study in the College of Law. Demonstrated financial need. Financial need.

Duration: Annual

Deadline: Students are notified about application procedures in the fall.

Information: Scholarships and Awards
Office of the Registrar
University of Saskatchewan
105 Administration Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A2
Phone: (306) 966-6748
Fax: (306) 966-6730
E-mail: awards@usask.ca
Internet: www.students.usask.ca/aboriginal/


Nexen Aboriginal Student Energy Awards - College of Arts and Science - University of Saskatchewan

Business Economics, Aboriginal Public Administration, Land Use and Environmental Studies, Environmental Earth Sciences, Archaeology B. Sc., Geological Sciences, Geophysics, or Public Administration.

The bursary is $2,000 per year for new students and $5,000 per year for continuing students (maximum of 4 years).

Entering students

Value: $2,000 each (ten awards)

Entering students who have self-identified on their application for admission to the University of Saskatchewan are automatically considered.

Course requirements

Criteria: will be based on high school or secondary level academic
achievement and a written interest in pursuing an undergraduate degree
in one of the areas of study noted above.

Deadline: July 31


Continuing students

Value: $5,000 each (6 awards)

Aboriginal Public Administration or Public Administration

Archaeology (B. Sc)

Environmental Earth Sciences (EES)

Geological Sciences or Geophysics

Land Use and Environmental Studies (LUEST).

Applications

Deadline: July 31

Charlotte Ross;
Coordinator of Academic Programs for Aboriginal Students
College of Arts and Science - Dean's Office
University of Saskatchewan
9 Campus Drive
Rm. 265 Arts Building
Saskatoon SK, S7N 5A5

Phone (306) 966-4754 Fax (306)966-7171

E-mail: charlotte.ross@usask.ca

To obtain an application form for any of these awards, please use the following link: www.arts.usask.ca/aboriginalstudents/

University of Toronto

University of Toronto (11):

Gladys Watson Aboriginal Education Fund

First Nations House Grant Program

Kathleen Green Savan Bursary

The President's Award for the Outstanding
Native Student of the Year

Lillian McGregor Award of Excellence

City of Toronto Scholarships in Aboriginal Health

Faculty of Social Work Chancellor Rose Wolfe Scholarship

Faculty of Pharmacy Colonel F.A. Tilston Admission Scholarship

General Motors Scholarships / Grants for Native Students

Métis Nation of Ontario Bursary

University of Toronto Advanced Planning for Students Students (UTAPS)

Information:
The Financial Aid Counsellor
First Nations House
University of Toronto
563 Spadina Avenue, 3rd Floor
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1
Phone: (416) 978-1290
Toll Free: 1-800-810-8069
Email: fnh.info@utoronto.ca

 


Gladys Watson Aboriginal Education Fund - University of Toronto

Awarded to Aboriginal students enrolled in graduate programs at the masters or doctoral level, and to second-entry professional programs (law, medecine, education, etc.)

Preference will be given to those students who demonstrate financial need.

Deadline: July 1


First Nations House Grant Program - University of Toronto

Grants are available for Aboriginal students. Grants are non-repayable awards ranging in amount, which assist students who have demonstrated financial need.

Students are eligible to apply in both the fall and winter terms.

Information:


Kathleen Green Savan Bursary - University of Toronto

Awarded to an Aboriginal student enrolled in the Transitional Year Programme at the University of Toronto.

Deadline: End of November


The President's Award for the Outstanding Native Student of the Year - University of Toronto

Awarded to an Aboriginal student enrolled in the third or higher year of an undergraduate programme or in any year of a graduate programme or second-level entry professional programme ( ie: Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine).

Deadline: November


The Lillian McGregor Award of Excellence - University of Toronto

Awarded to an Aboriginal woman studying at the University of Toronto and is based on academic excellence, community service and financial need.

Deadline: July


City of Toronto Scholarships in Aboriginal Health - University of Toronto

Two scholarships awarded to Aboriginal students studying in any of the health professional programs, undergraduate or graduate, on the basis of financial need, academic merit and demonstrated community leadership skills.

Deadline: September


Faculty of Social Work Chancellor Rose Wolfe Scholarship - University of Toronto

One award to a registered M.S.W. or Ph. D. Native Student based on proven scholastic ability. Financial need may be a consideration.


Faculty of Pharmacy Colonel F.A. Tilston Admission Scholarship - University of Toronto

One award to an Aboriginal student


General Motors Scholarships / Grants for Native Students - University of Toronto (Victoria College)

A number of scholarship/grants to Native students registered at Victoria College. Awards will be given on the basis of financial need and academic excellence.

Deadline: September


Métis Nation of Ontario Bursary - University of Toronto

Registered MNO students can apply - based on financial need and contribution to the Métis community.


University of Toronto Advanced Planning for Students Students (UTAPS)

In April 1998, the Governing Council approved a new pPolicy on Student Financial Support. The Policy states, as a fundamental principle, that "No student admitted to a program at the University of toronto should be unable to enroll or complete the programme due to a lack of financial means." The University will assess financial need and will, if the need is demonstrated, provide additional assistance in the form of a non-repayable grant called UTAPS.

Information:
The Financial Aid Counsellor
First Nations House
University of Toronto
563 Spadina Avenue, 3rd Floor
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1
Phone: (416) 978-1290
Toll Free: 1-800-810-8069
Email: fnh.info@utoronto.ca

 

University of Windsor

University of Windsor:

Leroy Freeman Altiman Memorial Award

Stuart H. Surlin Bursary for Aboriginal Students

University of Windsor Turtle Island Bursary

Geoffry H. Wood Native Bursary

Windsor-Essex Metis Council Bursary

 

Apply on-line: www.uwindsor.ca

Turtle Island House / Aboriginal Education Centre
University of Windsor
496 Sunset Avenue
Windsor, Ontario
N9B 3P4

Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext. 3481
Fax: (519) 971-3689
Email: turtleisland@uwindsor.ca


Leroy Freeman Altiman Memorial Award - University of Windsor

Deadline: October 31

Eligibility: One or more bursaries to be awarded on the basis of merit and need to full-time students in a program of studies concerned with or of direct benefit to the Indians, Inuit, and Metis of Canada. Established in 1983 in memory of Leroy Freeman Altiman, member of Walpole Island Indian Band.


Stuart H. Surlin Bursary for Aboriginal Students - University of Windsor

Deadline: October 31

Eligibility: In recognition of Dr. Surlin's interests in Aboriginal culture and values, a bursary fund has been established in his name to assist in-course Canadian/Permanent Resident students of Aboriginal ancestry residing in Ontario in completing their studies at the University of Windsor.


University of Windsor Turtle Island Bursary - University of Windsor

Deadline: October 31 (Fall Term), February 15 (Winter Term) and June 15 (Summer Term)

Eligibility: In-course students of Aboriginal ancestry (Non-status, Metis, Bill C-31, Status, Innu, Inuit) who can demonstrate financial need may apply for this bursary. value $500 - $1000 per term. Candidates must be Canadian citizens/Permanent Residents residing in Ontario.


Geoffry H. Wood Native Bursary - University of Windsor

Value: $250

Up to four (4) awards annually.

Deadline: October 31 (Fall Term), February 15 (Winter Term)

Eligibility: Candidates must be of Aboriginal ancestry (Non-status, Metis, Bill C-31, Status, Innu, Inuit) who maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 5.0 and demonstrate financial need.


Windsor-Essex Metis Council Bursary - University of Windsor

Value: $1000

Two (2) awards annually.

Deadline: October 31

Eligibility: Awarded annually based on academic achievement (minimum GPA 5.0) and financial need, to full-time undergraduate and graduate students who are members of the Metis Nation of Ontario.

Application forms available at the Student Awards Office.

Apply on-line: www.uwindsor.ca

Turtle Island House / Aboriginal Education Centre
University of Windsor
496 Sunset Avenue
Windsor, Ontario
N9B 3P4

Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext. 3481
Fax: (519) 971-3689
Email: turtleisland@uwindsor.ca

Search Tips

Aboriginal scholarships and bursaries: how to find them

By Allison Kydd
Windspeaker Contributor
EDMONTON

With winter session over and spring and summer sessions either underway or soon to be, this is a good time for students and prospective students to start planning for September.

Finances are always a consideration, but there are a number of scholarships and bursaries offered specifically to Aboriginal students. These awards come from both the public and the private sector; however, new awards are being developed and other awards updated, so it is sometimes difficult for both individuals and institutions to keep abreast of all the possibilities.

There are, however, some logical sources of information on scholarships and bursaries. Many post-secondary institutions offer awards themselves. For instance, Grant MacEwan College in Edmonton has formed partnerships with various other organizations in order to offer special incentives. One new award offered through the Grant MacEwan College Foundation is the Aboriginal Business Leadership Award.

As Lori Hanasyk of Grant MacEwan says, the award is "business-driven". It came about because 10 or fifteen organizations, some of them large corporations, identified the need and put together the funding. It will offer a minimum of four awards [$1,500 each] annually, and the deadline for applications is June 15 for the following academic year.

This particular initiative is not only directed to a special area of study, one leading to a certificate, diploma or degree in business or commerce, but also targets three groups of applicants. First priority will be given to one or more self-employed Aboriginal students who are attending an Alberta post-secondary institution for the first time. The next priority is for one or more mature students attending such an institution for the first time. The third priority opens up the award to one or more Aboriginal students registered in such a program and also at a public post-secondary educational institution in Alberta.

Another place for a student to go for information on education awards is his or her regional office of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. In Edmonton, the person fielding general inquiries about educational programs is Delbert Dahl. Regina Holehouse, communications officer for the same office, would also recommend the Native Counselling Centre.

The University of Alberta offers both the Native Student Services office and the Aboriginal Student Council as resources. There is also an excellent handbook which lists awards, and application forms for many of these scholarships are available at Native Student Services [Student Union Building.] Students in other parts of the country or at other institutions should make enquiries at equivalent student services organizations.

Aboriginal students should give special attention to the Northern Alberta Development Council bursaries, offered through the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund. Though the bursaries are not offered exclusively to Aboriginal students, the latter often have an advantage, having lived and worked in northern communities. Audrey DeWitt, of Peace River, development officer and contact person for the bursaries, suggests that information and applications are distributed to all Aboriginal communities, Métis settlements and Native cultural centres. Besides having experience living and working in the north, desirable candidates for the award have a clear idea of what they want to do, have contacted prospective employers and are near the conclusion of their university or college programs

There are other community resources, such as public libraries, which are storehouses of material on awards. One such resource is Winning Scholarships: a Students' Guide to Entrance Awards at Western Canadian Universities and Colleges (1994). There are two other volumes, one for Ontario universities and colleges (1992) and one for universities and colleges in Atlantic Canada and Quebec (1992). All are published by the University of Toronto Press. The books themselves are not user-friendly - plan to sit down and work out the codes for the institutions which interest you. However, there are separate listings for scholarships for Native students, so time spent would probably be worthwhile.

Many university libraries and public libraries also have access to the Internet by way of the World Wide Web. This is a growing source of information on practically everything.

Besides the awards offered through government programs and educational institutions, there are a number of private sector scholarships, generally offered by certain industries to those students enrolled in (or planning to enroll in) related courses of study. Indian Affairs in Ottawa published a directory of private sector funding in 1994. Though there are a limited number of copies available, and some of the awards mentioned might no longer be available, it would still be worthwhile to check in at the regional office and ask to see it.

For most of these private sector awards, status Indians, non-status Indians, Inuit and Métis all qualify; however, some requirements are more specific. For instance, eligibility for the Native Scholarship Award of the Alberta Energy Company Ltd. not only depends on candidates being first accepted into a program related to the oil and gas industry at an accredited technical school, college or university, but also stipulates that candidates have "resided in the Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta, Blackfeet Reservation or Fort Berthold Reservation for the last year." For those who do qualify, however, it appears to be an excellent opportunity, since each year five $3,500 scholarships are presented.

Another private sector sponsor, the Royal Bank, has just awarded five scholarships of $1,000 per year (maximum of four years at university or two year college program) in disciplines "relevant to the banking industry." This scholarship, called the "Royal Bank Native Student Awards Program" has been active since 1992 and has awarded scholarships to 25 students. Royal Bank representatives suggest that the scholarship "provides an opportunity for the Royal Bank to strengthen its relationship with the Native community."

Xerox Canada's Aboriginal Scholarship Program is, predictably, for full-time students registered in approved Canadian institutions and pursuing academic programs "which could lead to careers in the information technology industry." This program is also generous. Four scholarships, each worth $3,000 per year, will be awarded. The deadline for applications is June 15. Study programs mentioned are computer/math sciences, business administration/commerce or engineering.

Since there are new scholarships and bursaries being offered every year, by levels of government and by the private sector, as well as by educational institutions themselves, Aboriginal students should follow up on all leads. Furthermore, if band/community organizations do not have information and applications available, candidates should request that they be made available.


 

Jumping the hurdles on the scholarship run

By Allison Kydd
Windspeaker Contributor
TORONTO

Lois Edge of Native Student Services at the University of Alberta regrets that only a handful of Aboriginal students apply for scholarships and bursaries. Says Edge, "the norm is not to apply because I may not have been successful enough."

Another difficulty for students attempting to access awards is that the "criteria for the awards is often too rigid." She offers the example of mature students, especially women, often single parents with children to support. A grade point average of 88 per cent is simply not a reasonable expectation. A better method, says Edge, is to ask for a "satisfactory grade point average," which encourages more people to apply.

She also says those funding agencies who want to help Aboriginal students might consider how there are a disproportionate number of awards given to the sciences, while the majority of Native students tend towards arts, education and Native studies. The directory of Aboriginal Students' Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards put out by Native Student Services at the University of Alberta lists about 60 awards, but Edge says that the average student would probably only find one or two for which he or she could apply.

At the same time, certain companies and funding organizations have complained of too few applications. A lucrative award - up to $10,000 for graduate students and $5,000 for undergraduates - known as the "John Paul II" and offered under the auspices of the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund until 1994, was discontinued because there were too few applications.

Other funding organizations, such as CanCom, who with the Canadian Native Arts Foundation and Television Northern Canada (TVNC) offer the Ross Charles Award, have asked themselves whether a decreased number of applications might be an indication that the award needs to be changed or expanded.

For instance, the Ross Charles Award was initially created in 1987 as an achievement award directed at northern communities. Two years ago, it was transformed into a training award intended to offer "young northern Aboriginal professionals" experience in the broadcasting industry. Next year, the award intends further, so it can accommodate applications from all Inuit, First Nations and Métis communities in Canada.

Similarly, the law school scholarship program offered by the federal Department of Justice to non-status Aboriginals and Métis - an award for which there are no lack of applications - has changed its emphasis since it began in1973. At first it funded a specific number of students. More recently, an amount of money has been allotted to the program every year, and the committee - with the best applications on the table - makes a decision whether to fund specific candidates for one, two or three years.

Another innovation by the justice department award program was the inclusion of funding for pre-law as well as law programs themselves. This summer program helps prepare students to compete for law school. The office of the scholarship program manager, Mireille Provost, says the program always receives more applicants than it is able to fund. The criteria used by the committee in making its choices attempt to be sensitive to a variety of circumstances.

"Need and potential for success are considered as well as merit." Moving expenses are also taken into account where applicable

Another impediment for Aboriginal students in Canada who are seeking financial assistance in the form of scholarships and bursaries appears to be that the information is sometimes hard to find. There is no one comprehensive catalogue of scholarships and bursaries to which they can refer. What there is instead is a collection of newspaper advertisements, various lists and handbooks, some of them out of date, put out by companies and institutions themselves, as well as by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

Ellen Neumann of Native Student Services at the University of Alberta says that Native students regularly come to the office to use their handbook - which is scheduled for an update this summer - and can obtain many of the application forms right there as well. Those application forms which are not on hand can be obtained from the companies which offer the scholarships. Neumann says she hasn't seen any reluctance about applying for the awards.

Audrey de Witt of Peace River, spokesperson for the Northern Alberta Development Corporation Bursary program, hasn't noticed that Aboriginal students display any reluctance to apply for awards either. She says, "from our perspective, we get a lot of applications . . . many of them from Aboriginal students. And many are successful."

De Witt also says that Aboriginal students need not be discouraged from applying because the bursaries are not targetted specifically towards First Nations, Métis and Inuit students. Having lived in northern communities is by itself a definite advantage. Candidates are asked detailed questions about their plans and their commitment to living and working in the North, including what prospective employers they have contacted. So here again knowledge of specific communities and the opportunities in them gives an edge.

Rob Ireland, corporate affairs manager for Xerox Canada, who also widely advertise their Aboriginal Scholarship Program, which offers scholarships of $3,000 per year to four students in academic programs which could lead to careers in the information technology, also says they have no shortage of candidates. This year they had 113 applications. Since the program started in 1994, they have given out 16 awards.

Bernie McKee, education manager with the Native Education Project of the Alberta Department of Education, takes note of the scholarships and other awards which come across her desk. However, since she immediately passes them on to the schools in her area (formerly northern Alberta, now southern Alberta), and candidates apply to the agencies and private companies personally, she doesn't get an overview of the response by either students or schools. She too feels that having a comprehensive catalogue of such awards would be useful.


Check out the web

By Cheryl Petten
Windspeaker Contributor

According to one scholarship web site on the internet - www.scholarshipscanada.com - there are more than 60,000 scholarships, bursaries and awards available from organizations across Canada. The question is, what is the best way to find them and, once you have found them, how can you increase the chances that your application will receive a favorable response?

Stuart Dunn is assistant to the director with Alberta Learning, the provincial government department that administers the Alberta Scholarship program. One of the major scholarships administered by the department is the Aboriginal Health Careers Bursary, awarded to Aboriginal students in a health care field.

According to Dunn, the best place to start in a search for scholarship information is the internet.
The Alberta Learning site is located at alis.gov.ab.ca/scholarships, and contains links to the department's scholarship page, as well as to Alberta Agriculture's scholarship page. The site also includes links to colleges and universities in Alberta, as well as links to other scholarship sites.

Scholarship information is also available from a number of independent web sites, Dunn added.

Once someone has identified a few scholarships they might be interested in applying for, Dunn suggests they get a copy of the application form, and read it over. If they have any questions at all about the application, they shouldn't be afraid to ask them.

"From what I understand from my selection committee, which is made up of Aboriginal people, people in general don't like to call and ask questions, because they're afraid it makes them sound dumb. And I think, again from what my selection committee has told me, I think Aboriginal people feel this way even more strongly, because they feel that it's probably not really so much their world as somebody else's world. No question ever comes across as dumb. We're talking about money here. This is the way you get money. This is what we do, this is our job, so we get paid money to answer these questions. If anything doesn't make any sense at all, call and ask the question," Dunn said.

Another piece of advice Dunn offers to students applying for scholarships is take the time to do a good job filling out the application forms.

"One thing that really destroys applications, really ruins a good application, is just not taking a little bit of time to fill it out right. Make it neat, make it legible."

Dunn said that, with some scholarship applications, the information is sent off to a selection committee to review.

"We ask the students to send photocopies because we send the photocopies off to the selection committee and keep the original. It gives the selection committee a chance to review everything on their own time. If it's not legible, the committee isn't going to come back to the student and say, 'What did you say here? What did you mean here?' They'll just suffer through it as long as they can, and then they'll give up on that person," he said. "It really makes a world of difference - make it neat. Even if you've got nothing to say, say it neatly.

"A lot of people, by the time it comes to scholarship status, a lot of what they've done, and a lot of what's behind them, is remarkably similar. The marks are in the same range, they've accomplished certain things by the time they get to applying for a scholarship, so what really makes a lot of difference is what they say and how they say it. And that's the only thing they can influence by the time they apply for the scholarship anyway."

Dunn said most of the scholarships his department administers have a deadline for application two or three months before the next school year begins. To provide themselves with enough time for adequate preparation, he advises students to start applying for scholarships at least six to eight months before the beginning of the school year, adding that even a year in advance is not too early, especially for high school students.

"I would strongly recommend high school students start talking to their high school counsellor, even in Grade 10. At Grade 10 they can make sure they're taking the right courses that will get them into scholarships, as well. I mean, if they have two courses that they're equally interested in and they have to chose one, it makes a difference for a scholarship."

"It's like so many other things, you know, you can always make up more time before hand, you can't make it up afterwards,"he added.

Another source of information about scholarships is the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation. The foundation awards scholarships to Aboriginal students in the arts, business, sciences and health careers. Last year, scholarships and educational and cultural grants handed out by the foundation totalled $1.68 million.

Lorre Jensen is director of education for the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation. According to Jensen, the scholarships offered by the foundation fall into three categories - arts, health and general education.

Applications in each of the three categories are judged by a jury made up of Aboriginal people working in that specific field.

For a scholarship application to be successful in the arts category, Jensen indicated the most important factor is the quality of the work sample submitted by the applicant. With an arts application, students must send in a sample of their work - drama students would send in a videotape of themselves performing a scene or monologue, creative writing students would provide a sample of their writing, students in visual arts would send in slides showing samples of their work, and musicians would send in an audio tape.

"In the arts category, the thing that everyone really needs to pay best attention to, is the work sample. To do your very best - everyone must do their very best - and that's what the jury will place the most prominence on when they are reviewing."

In applications for health careers or general education scholarships, what the juries will be looking at is the applicant's academic performance. However, when reviewing a student's academic standings, the juries will take into consideration any mitigating circumstances. For instance, Jensen explained, a student who is a single parent and is getting marks of 65 per cent would be viewed by the jury as being as successful as a student with no dependents who is getting 80 per cent.

"The juries view that as real success," Jensen said. "Getting 80 per cent is a lovely thing to have happen to us all, but we do look at the individual student."

The other deciding factor in awarding scholarships in all three categories is financial need, as well as the applicant's willingness to contribute financially to his or her own education.

"We're not promoting people to get way in debt over this, but most often if students have a summer job and they're able even to save up $300, juries will view that in a very favorable way as a sign of commitment on the part of the student," Jensen said.

The deadlines for scholarship applications in the arts are March 31 and Sept. 30 of each year. The deadline for scholarships in health is May 1 each year, and the deadline for general education scholarships is June 1.

For more information about how to apply for scholarships through the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation, visit the foundation's web site atwww.naaf.ca. According to Jensen, the applications have been revised this year and are on the web site ready for downloading. Forms are available in both English and French. Applications can also be obtained by calling the foundation toll-free at 1-800-329-9780, where you can talk to Jensen or another staff member and have the appropriate application form sent out.

 


 

Increase your chances, be neat and thorough

By Joan Black
Windspeaker Contributor

It is no secret that the cost of education can leave students with a debt burden that is into the tens of thousands of dollars. People pursuing a post-secondary education, therefore, are looking for all the financial help they can get. Windspeaker contacted several people with professional experience in academic institutions to find out how students can prepare for and acquire a scholarship or bursary.

The Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund was at the top of everyone's list for students in Alberta. The fund publishes a brochure that lists 40 scholarships administered by them. Stewart Dunn, assistant to the manager at Edmonton Advanced Education and Career Development, which manages the fund, had some advice for students wanting to increase their chances of getting a scholarship.

Dunn stressed the need to take time to proofread and revise your scholarship application before submitting it.

"Do a rough draft first," he said. "Edit it and then put it down. There are simple little mistakes I'll see on scholarships and I know the committee will get this and think, well this person's illiterate, in spite of the fact that the transcript may say they're the most wonderful person in the world.

"If people spell things wrong, or miss words or something like that, it makes them look like they aren't scholarship material. You know the people are a lot smarter than this, but we can't tell the committee 'Assume the person is smarter than the application.'

"There are things you can't affect," Dunn continued; "[for] most of our scholarships we look at transcripts and that is set. You've gone to school, you've earned your marks; there's nothing you can do at the point of applying for a scholarship that's going to affect your transcript.

"Some of the scholarships ask for reference letters . . . . It's really up to you to make sure you choose a good reference, somebody who'll give you a good letter. Encourage them to say as much as they possibly can. We have a lot of people who will say this is a wonderful kid, but if you say that in one or two sentences on a reference letter, it's not that strong.
"What I really like to encourage students [to do] is sell yourself; tell the committee why, if they have to choose between people, why they would choose you over somebody else."

It's not enough, though, to include everything about yourself you can think of.

"Some people, " Dunn said, "go on and on forever, and that's not going to work either. At some point, whoever is reading it, whether it be a job reference or a scholarship one, they're going to get tired of reading about you. Hit the details, but do it right, do it nice - legible, clean.

"Most of our scholarships, we ask them to send in a photocopy or several photocopies of the application. We keep the original and we mail the photocopies off to committee members. Some people send in photocopies that I can't read - if we catch that, we'll re-photocopy, but they shouldn't rely on that. They should make sure that they print, don't write, make it legible. Go out of your way, because those are the little things you can influence the committee with."

Asked if there was a general rule as to how much marks count as compared to other factors, Dunn said it was difficult to be specific about percentages.

"It does vary so much from scholarship to scholarship. The scholarship we give out the most, the Alexander Rutherford, is solely based on marks; the only way they can mess it up on the application form is, you know, we still get people who don't even know their own address and things like that, and even that doesn't disqualify them; it just means we can't get money out to them.

"For most other competitions where it's beyond marks, it usually becomes a question of where they will rate marks into it. One third of it may be marks; one third of it may be other accomplishments; and one third of it going on to an essay or something like that. In all of these things, what I find consistently is that [in] the essay-type questions, the students could do a lot better than they do.

"At the higher level of scholarships we ask them if they've ever had publications, other awards . . . they can't change that [either]. What they can change, though, is illegibility, the whole tone of their application. They can make that neat and crisp."

Dunn sums up his advice by saying students should consult their high school counsellors or the awards office in their university or college for the latest information about availability of scholarships and how to apply.

Corey Crewe, a placement testing co-ordinator at Alberta College, agrees that the institution you are attending is the best place to start. He asked some students what they thought about seeking scholarships. They told him that every school should have a display board for scholarships and that educators should remind the students to review it frequently for new information. As do most schools, Alberta College keeps a list of scholarship sources known to them - the government ones and many private ones. They urge students to ask their parents about their employers' scholarships and bursaries, too, Crewe said. Many companies offer educational support that people don't even know about.

The Royal Bank is one corporation that since 1992 has granted educational awards through its Native Student Awards Program. Five students receive $4,000 annually for their educational expenses to a maximum of four years at university or two years at college. Recipients who are interested may also be considered for summer and post-graduate employment with the bank. An independent committee of Aboriginal academics reviews the applications and selects students according to personal and academic achievement and financial need. The awards are available to status and non-status Indians, Inuit and Métis.

The biggest problem Crewe sees is that students are not always aware of who should be applying for what. He stresses talking to your school's scholarship advisor, rather than going on your own. Sometimes advisors know about additional scholarships for which you should apply, and they can help with resumes, which may be required.

The other thing Crew encourages is for students to prepare their grades at least a year before applying for a scholarship, in order to beat the competition. Personal qualities, such as leadership, volunteerism, and good recommendations from teachers and community leaders also count, he said.

Jack Fuller, a spokesman with Continuing Education Services at Edmonton Public Schools, reiterated that about 80 per cent of scholarships are based on academic merit, but that personal attributes also matter.

Fuller identified the Rutherford Scholarship from the Alberta Heritage Trust Fund as the largest in this province, benefiting students who have an average of 80 per cent over five courses. Six thousand people qualify for the Rutherford every year and may receive $1,500 each over three years of study. People who have completed Grade 12 can apply, he said, even adults who graduated with high averages years ago.

"Go for it even if you think you're not qualified," Fuller advises. "A number of scholarships are not claimed every year - the board may waive some of the requirements."

In Edmonton, Fuller said, there are 300 to 400 scholarships administered by organizations such as the Masons, and corporations such as MacDonald's, to which students can apply. About 5,000 scholarships are available across Canada. Every public school has a book listing available scholarships, Fuller added. Finally, he noted that many post-secondary institutions put their scholarship information on the internet.


Scholarships by School

Brandon University: 6 listings

Camosun College: 10 listings

Confederation College: 9 listings

Dalhousie University: 3 listings

First Nations University of Canada (FNUC): 30+ listings

Georgian College: 3 listings

Grant McEwan College: 16 listings

Lakehead University: 9 listings

Laurentian University: 2 listings

Nipissing University: 4 listings

Northern Alberta Institute of Technology:
NAIT Aboriginal
Student Club

Okanagen University College: 2 listings

Queen's University: 2 listings

Sault College: 7 listings

SIAST: Gabriel Dumont Award

Simon Fraser University: 3 listings

University of Alberta (UofA): 17 listings

University of British Columbia (UBC): 15 listings

University of Calgary: 12 listings

University of Lethbridge: 9 listings

University of Manitoba: 45 listings

University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC): 3 listings

University of Ottawa: 1 listing

University of Regina: 20+ listings

University of Saskatchewan: 13 listings

University of Toronto: 11 listings

University of Windsor: 5 listings

USA Scholarships


Pete Steffens Native American Scholarship

Value: $1,000

About the Scholarship: The Pete Steffens Native American Scholarship was established to honor the legacy of journalist, professor and advocate Pete Steffensby providing opportunities for Native American and other Indigenous students to study journalism at Western Washington University.          

Eligibility:

  • Students must be admitted to Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA.  Please visit http://admissions.wwu.edu/ to apply for admission to Western Washington University by January 31st.  
  • Students are eligible to receive this scholarship in any year of their studies, from their

freshman year through graduate studies.

  • Preference given to Native American and other Indigenous students who are US or Canadian citizens.
  • Preference given to those with financial need.
  • Preference given to students interested in studying Journalism.

Application: In addition to your Western Washington University admissions application, please complete the Pete Steffens Native American Scholarship application, found here:

http://www.wwu.edu/journalism/scholarships.shtml

Contact Information:

Angie Vandenhaak, Director of Development
WWU Foundation/WWU Office of University Advancement
MS 9034
Bellingham, WA 98225-9034

 Angela.vandenhaak@wwu.edu

(360) 650-7647 (office) (360) 927-0457 (cell)


Presidential Diversity Scholarship - St Lawrence University

Value: $15,000/year scholarship
Dedicated to Aboriginal, hispanic, black and Asian Americans and Canadians, including a US$15,000/year scholarship, as well as additional favourable aid
based on family need.

For more information contact:
Skip Staats
Office of Admissions
St Lawrence University
Canton NY 13617
1 800 285 1856

A website specific to the program is currently under construction.


Government Finance Officers Association Minorities in Government Finance Scholarship
Value: One scholarship of US$3,500.
The Minorities in Government Finance Scholarship is funded by J.D.Edwards, Fidelity Investments Government Services Division,Financial Guaranty Insurance Co., Georgia GFOA, ICMA Retirement Corporation, MBIA, Girard and Lynn Miller Foundation, Minnesota GFOA, and Nations Bank. It recognizes and encourages outstanding minority students enrolled in a course of studies preparing for a career in public finance.
Eligibility: This scholarship competition is for Canadian or U.S.minority students of public administration,(governmental) accounting, finance, political science, economics or business administration (with a specific focus on government or nonprofit management)at the upper-division undergraduate or graduate level. Candidates must belong to one of the following groups (as defined by the U.S.Census Bureau): Black, Indian, Eskimo or Aleut, Asian or Pacific Islander,or Hispanic.Candidates should have a superior record of academic achievement and/or job performance and show promise of completion of their studies at a high level of
performance. In addition,candidates should have plans to pursue a career in s ate or local government finance.

Deadline: February 13
Government Finance Officers Association
Scholarship Committee
180 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 800
Chicago, Illinois 60601-7476
Phone: (312) 977-9700
Fax: (312) 977-4806


American Planning Association APA Planning Fellowship

Value: Several scholarships from $2,000 to $5,000.
The goals of the APA Planning Fellowship are both to encourage students of certain minority backgrounds to enter the planning profession, and to help such students who would otherwise be unable to continue their studies in planning. The program is open to first-and second-year students. First-year students who receive fellowships are eligible to compete for an award the following year.

Eligibility: In order to be eligible, applicants must: be a member of one of the following minority groups: Black,Mexican-American, Native American/North American Indian or Puerto Rican; be a citizen of the United States or Canada; be enrolled or accepted for enrollment, in a graduate planning program that has been accredited by the Planning Board. Preference is shown to full- time students; and document the need for financial assistance.
Deadline: May 15

Attention: Assistant for Division and Student Services
APA Planning Fellowship Program
American Planning Association
1776 Massachusetts Avenue N.W.
Washington, DC 20036 U.S.A.


American Indian Scholarship Fund, Inc.
The Native American Scholarship Fund was founded in 1986, and has made awards to a total of 131 carefully selected students. Out of the 131, only six have dropped out, for a retention rate of 96 percent, the highest rate of retention of Indian students of any college or scholarship program in the nation. The dropout rate for Indian students at the University of New Mexico, for comparison, is 83 percent for freshmen alone. Our priorities are math, engineering, science, business, education, and computers.
Native American Scholarship Fund
8200 Mountain Rd, NE, Ste 203;
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110
Phone: 505-262-2351
web site: www.collegefund.org


Canada- US Fullbright Program
Student must be American or Canadian with Native Heritage and attending a post-secondary education institution studying countries relations between other countries. Value of award is $15,000.00 for student and $25,000.00 for faculty members enrolled in graduate studies.
For more information contact:

Ste. 2015, 350 Albert Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 1AP
Phone: (613) 237-5366
Fax: (613) 237-2029


AISES - Schuyler M. Meyer, Jr Scholarship Fund
Value: $1,000
Deadline: June 15

Download application from: www.aises.org

Eligibility: Must be Aboriginal and a member of AISES. Students must be pursuing studies in the following: sciences, engineering, health related fields, business, natural resources, math or science secondary education.
AISES Scholarship Department
5661 Airport Boulevard
Boulder, Colorado USA 80301
Phone: (303) 939-0023


AISES - A.T. Anderson Memorial Scholarship
Value: $1,000 Undergraduate and $2,000 Graduate
Deadline: June 15

Download application from: www.aises.org

Eligibility: Must be Aboriginal and a member of AISES. Students must be pursuing studies in the following: sciences, engineering, health related fields, business, natural resources, math or science secondary education.
AISES Scholarship Department
5661 Airport Boulevard
Boulder, Colorado USA 80301
Phone: (303) 939-0023


AISES - EPA Tribal Lands Environmental Science Scholarship
Value: $4,000
Deadline: June 15

Download application from: www.aises.org

Eligibility: Must be a member of AISES. Must pursue studies in the following: chemical engineering, biochemistry, chemistry, toxicology, biology, entomology & related environmental disciplines.

AISES Scholarship Department
5661 Airport Boulevard
Boulder, Colorado USA 80301
Phone: (303) 939-0023

Aboriginal Links

The Links Pages

Bill's Aboriginal Links/The Big List - This is a comprehensive list of Aboriginal links for both Canada and the U.S. It has finally been updated!

Canadian Aboriginal Portal - There's been a great deal of talk regarding the startup of this project. It looks comprehensive - but it's not the most comprehensive - and some of the links are already outdated. It remains to be seen if there will be a commitment to maintain and update the site in the future.

Native Web - Current information and links for education, culture and a great deal more. Great place to access listings of Aboriginal / Indigenous resources on the internet.

Lisa Mitten's Link Page - An additional resource for links to Native American resources on the internet.

Arctic Circle - A site whose objective is to stimulate a greater interest in the peoples and environment of the Arctic and Subarctic region.

Johnco Native Links - Very nice arrangement of links and fairly comprehensive.

 


 

 

Art & Artists

Joane Cardinal-Shubert - multi-media visual and installation artist, writer, lecturer, free-lance curator and director of film and video.

Wayne Lavallee - Official website of Cree/Metis singer/songwriter Wayne Lavallee:

James A. Simon Mishinbinijima - world-renowned native artist from Wikwemikong, Ontario. Through his art he demonstrates the connection and harmony with Mother Earth.

Natalie Rostad Desjarlais - Saskatchewan based Aboriginal artist.

Blue Raven Native Art - Online gallery features the works of several prominent West Coast Native artists

Bearclaw Gallery - A gallery featuring the works of contemporary Aboriginal artists including paintings, sculptures, prints, jewellery and crafts and artifacts.

Canadian Art Treasures - Online gallery features only First Nation, Inuit and Métis artists and is Aboriginal owned and operated. Layout and design makes it a joy to browse through all the art works.

Land InSights - Founded in 1990 Land InSights is the driving force behind the First Peoples' Festival, making Montreal a meeting place for the indigenous creativity of the three Americas for ten days in June.


Employment Resources On the Internet

Aboriginal Careers Page - Sure we're biased, but here is the best up-to-date listing of careers specifically targeted to Aboriginal people - updated every few days.


Government / Political Links

Anishinabek Nation - The Anishinabek Nation, founded in 1949 as the Union of Ontario Indians, is a political advocate and secretariat to 43 member First Nations across Ontario.

American Indian Movement -

Assembly of First Nations - Check out what the AFN is up to.

Congress of Aboriginal Peoples - An organization representing the rights and interests of off-reserve Aboriginal people in Canada.

Indian and Northern Affairs - Everything you wanted to know about INAC, programs services, history documentation etc.

 


 

 

Health & Wellness Links

Health Canada On-line - A comprehensive site with information, resources to improve the health of all Canadians.

Health Canada - HIV-AIDS - A collection of resources, information, links and interested groups.

Bent Arrow Traditional Healing Society - is a non-profit, charitable
organization established in November 1994 to provide direction and support for a variety of services targeting Aboriginal children, youth and their families.

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse - a non-profit organization working to minimize the harm associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.

Four Quarters Institute - an educational institution that serves to empower the growth and development of its students, faculty and staff. Respect, honour, dignity and integrity are the guiding principles to instil a harmonious outlook on life.

National Clearinghouse on Family Violence (NCFV) - The National Clearinghouse on Family Violence of Health Canada is a national resource centre for all Canadians seeking information and solutions to violence within the family.

Red Road Healing Society - Red Road HIV/AIDS Network Society. Support and advocacy for Aboriginal people with HIV/AIDS and their families.

Round Lake Treatment Centre - a 36-bed residential program for alcohol and drug dependent persons of First Nation's descent. Operations are governed by the Interior Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Society.

Visions & Nechi Centre - Brings together diverse communities, health promotion programs and funding sources to build healthy Aboriginal communities. Look here for technical and organizational support for Aboriginal health promotion initiatives.


Youth Links

Aboriginal Sports Circle - Canada's national voice for Aboriginal sport, which brings together the interests of First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples.

Aboriginal Youth Network - AYN has changed over the last few years - it's still worth a look. Check back periodically!

National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation - information on training, scholarships and of course the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards.

nextsteps - services youth between 15-24 years and have an excellent site and also a monthly magazine. Includes an Aboriginal link site (for Calgary and surrounding areas) in areas like employment, education/training, self-employment, funding and job search.

Turtle Tracks - a bi-weekly newsletter for kids from a Native American view.

Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth -


Economic Development

Aboriginal Business Canada - Plenty of information on starting, developing or fine-tuning your business.

Aboriginal Resource Centre - ARCNet is a not-for-profit venture whose sole purpose is to promote, specifically, Canadian Aboriginal businesses and organizations.

Aboriginal Youth Business Council - AYBC is a non-profit organization for the sole purpose of providing support to young entrepreneurs. If you have your own business, want to start one, take advantage of the resources at this site!

CANDO - The Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers provides valuable information on economic development initiatives and training.

CCAB - Canada Council for Aboriginal Business - Alberta Chapter. Find out about developing full partnerships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal business.

Métis Settlements General Council of Alberta - has legislated law making authority over membership, hunting, fishing, trapping, timber, and other matters relating to land.

Spirit of Aboriginal Enterprise - This web site provides information and contacts for both existing and aspiring Aboriginal entrepreneurs.


Cultural Sites

Alberta Friendship Centres Career Information - Represents 20 friendship centres throughout Alberta and works to improve the quality of life and increase opportunities for urban Aboriginal people.

British Columbia Association of Friendship Centres - find out what's happening at Friendship Centres throughout BC and, via links, throughout Canada.

Canadian Aboriginal Festival - a veriety of cultural and entertainment events to be held at Toronto's Skydome from November 23 - 26, 2000. Check the site for details and updates.

CopperEagle - The copper eagle canoe is an attempt to carve a 50' authentic Northwest Coast dug-out canoe at the Britannia Heritage Shipyard site.

Cree Culture - web site of the Cree Cultural Institute - the regional cultural organisation
of the nine Cree communities of Iiyiyuuschii, also known as the James Bay region of Quebec.

First People's Cultural Foundation - (FPCF) is a crown corporation that was created in 1990. The focus of the Council is to preserve and enhance the language, culture and heritage of Aboriginal people in B.C.

Land InSights - Founded in 1990 Land InSights is the driving force behind the First Peoples' Festival, making Montreal a meeting place for the indigenous creativity of the three Americas for ten days in June.

Manitoba Friendship Centres - Home of the Manitoba Association of Friendship Centres.

Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Centre - a tribally owned complex, brings to life the Native American and natural history of New England and of the Eastern Woodlands region through extensive permanent exhibits, cultural demonstrations and performances.

National Association of Frienship Centres - Committed to improving the quality of life for Aboriginal peoples in an urban environment by supporting self-determined activities.

NWT Friendship Centres - The site of the NWT Council of Friendship Centres.

Odawa Friendship Centre - positively effecting the quality of life for Aboriginal people in the Capital region.

Ontario Friendship Centres - The site of the Ontario Federation Of Indian Friendship Centres.

Quebec Friendship Centres - Regroupement des centres d'amitié autochtones du Québec -The RCAAQ represents the interests of its affiliated Centres with the National Association of Friendship Centres (NAFC).

Saskatchewan Friendship Centres - Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Saskatchewan's (AFCS) represent member Centres at the provincial and national levels by sharing expertise, resources, exchanging ideas to assist our Centres.

Dene Cultural Institute - Mandate is to work with the people of the Dene Nation, and with other organizations, to preserve, protect, and promote the Dene culture, languages, spirituality, heritage, traditions and customs.

Edmonton Metis Dance Cultural Society - formed in the fall of 1987, with young people taking dance classes at the Canadian Native Friendship Centre (CNFC). Site includes upcoming schedule and booking information.

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump - Located near Fort Macleod, Alberta, Canada at a place where the foothills of the Rocky Mountains meet the great plains, is the world's oldest, largest and best preserved buffalo jump known to exist.

Creenet - The official web site of the James Bay Cree.

Maskwachees Cultural College- It is our vision that the College be a well-spring from which the revival, retention and advocacy of the Native Culture shall flow. Located in Hobbema, Alberta.

Mashantucket Pequots Schemitzun Powwow 96 - Is this the biggest/most well-known powwow? Well it's in the top 5!

Métis Site - New Métis site featuring information on Métis from across North America, but focusing on Métis outside the prairies.

The Métis - A collection of sites and information dedicated to Métis interests.

Métis Gathering Point - A fine online resource of Métis related material.

Métis Geneology Site - genealogy resource site that adheres to the specific needs of the Aboriginal ancestry.

Louis Riel Home Page - A great deal of what you wanted to know about Métis leader Louis Riel. Plus a chronology of events and related links.

BC Métis Communication Centre - Lots of online links and resources of Métis related material.

Michif Cultural Preservation Society & The Louis Riel Métis Council -

Nishnawbe-Aski Nation (Treaty 9) Ojibway and Cree Cultural Centre -

Paul Gowder's Native American Powwow Dancing -

Saskatchewan Indian Cultural Centre - seeks to help maintain the cultural identity of the five cultures of the province. Includes cultural products, library and other information.

Saskatchewan Elders - A great section on Aboriginal Elders of Saskatchewan plus excellent links to some obscure Aboriginal sites.

Wachiay Aboriginal Friendship Centre - Friendship Centre in Courteney, BC.

Whetung Ojibwa Crafsts and Art Gallery- Experience the traditions of the past reflected in the present. Located in the heart of Curve Lake Indian Reserve only two hours north east of Toronto, Ontario.


Education

AMMSA bursary page - Of course you want to go to school, but you could also use some financial assistance. There has to be a scholarship or bursary available, right?

Anishinabek Educational Institute - Offers full-time diploma and professional development certificate programs.

Banff Centre for the Arts - Information for Aboriginal students wishing to enroll at the Banff Centre's Aboriginal Arts programs.

Banff Centre for Aboriginal Leadership and Self-Government - Information on Aboriginal Leadership programs, courses and workshops.

Canadian Education on the Web - brings together everything relating to Canada and education that has a presence on the World Wide Web.

Classroom Edition - Windspeaker - Special educational supplement designed for students to explore Aboriginal issues more in-depth.

Cradleboard Teaching Project - turns on the lights in public education about Native American culture - past, present, and most important for the children - the future.

Canada's First Nations - Native and Inuit Internet Resources - Education links and information specific to the Aboriginal people of Canada.

Great Minds - Educational Resources for Aboriginal Studies, First Nations Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Native American Studies. View on-line catalogue of Aboriginal and Native American Educational Resources for schools and the general public.

First Nation's School Net - A great site for students of all ages.Rich source of resources of all types for Aboriginal students and teachers (educational, curriculum, school websites, organizations, etc.).

First Nations Technical Institute - an Aboriginal owned and operated education and training facility located in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory in Ontario.

Indian Teacher Education Program - a four-year teacher education program designed for First Nations students interested in obtaining a Bachelor of Education degree. The goal of ITEP is to prepare First Nations teachers who will respond to the challenges associated with the educational needs of Aboriginal students.

Macrolink - A Registered Private Post Secondary Institution - a Prince George based company offering professional training services in all communities throughout northern and central British Columbia.

National Aboriginal Document Database - Offers comprehensive list of Aboriginal Treaties and landclaims in downloadable formats. Great resource for research and study!

Native Access Program for Engineering - Information for Aboriginal students on the Faculty of Engineering at Lakehead University - Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Native American Index - Education links, maps, arts, stories, and information to Aboriginal (Native American) people on both sides of the border.

Native Studies University of Alberta - Course outlines, schedules, student profiles, graduates and more.

Purich Publishing - small publishing house in Saskatchewan that specializes in academic books
on Aboriginal issues, Aboriginal history, politics and legal issues such as treaty rights, self government and native land claims.

Saskatchewan Indian Federated College - Canada's only accredited First Nations controlled university is on-line.

Turtle Island - A very thorough site on Canadian and North American Native Peoples. A place to exchange news, information, perspectives facing Native Peoples.

University of Alberta - School of Business Aboriginal Careers Initiative Web-site provides prospective and current Aboriginal business students, as well as employers and the general public, with information to increase the enrollment, retention, and success of Aboriginal people within the School's Undergraduate program.

UVic Indigenous Governance - University of Victoria's Indigenous Governance program was
founded in 1998, building on UVic's highly successful Administration of Aboriginal Governments program. The IGOV program provides its students with a framework of critical understanding and advocates a strategic approach to decolonization.

Visions Centre for Innovations - (Neechi Centre) Committed to developing and communicating an understanding of Aboriginal health issues.


First Nations on the Net

Anishinabek Nation - throughout Ontario.

Canim Lake First Nation - the people of Tsqescen (Broken Rock), part of the Shuswap Nation of the Interior Salish people of British Columbia.

Carrier Sekani Tribal Council - situated in BC's northern interior. Eight member nations stake out a larger role in today's political and economic climate.

Membertou Mi'kmaq - This is the web site for the Mi'kmaq community of Membertou. It provides insight into Membertou, provides information on the current issues confronting the Mi'kmaq Nation including other First Nations.

Nisga'a People of British Columbia -

Old Crow: Land of the Vuntut Gwitch'in -

Salt River First Nation - The home page of the Salt River First Nation located in Fort Smith, Norwest Territoties.


Special Interest

Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples - Everything you wanted to know about the final report. Plus you can download information free of charge.


Media

Canada's Aboriginal Communications Societies - links page to put you in contact with Canada's Aboriginal communications societies/groups.

Canadian Native Publication Links are here...

Canadian Native Radio Station Links are here...

American Native Publication Links are here...

APTN - The Aboriginal Peoples Television Network - Check it for for program info and schedules.

Native Recording Artists are here...

 


 

 

Veterans

Tribute to Canada's Aboriginal Veterans - details the history of Canadian Aboriginal's overseas military service - Native soldiers in WWI,WWII and Korea. Links to "Profiles of Aboriginal veterans"- their service biographies and awards.

First Nations Veterans Assoc of Southern Alberta -


Affiliated Associations

Canadian Magazine Publishers Association (CMPA) - Dozens of Canadian Magazines of every interest are available for browsing on-line or subscription. Windspeaker is proud to be a member of the CMPA.

Native American Journalists Association - NAJA is composed of Native print, broadcast and new media journalists from the United States, Canada and Latin America. Members represent both Native and mainstream media.


Commercial Sites

Abenaki Associates - provides professional training and computer-based services to communities and organizations to facilitate self-reliance, management efficiency and resource development.

Aboriginal Mall - Buy or sell Aboriginal made products through this secured site. Also a convenient online source of Aboriginal news, events, programs/services and business listings.

Aboriginal Mapping Network - A collection of resource pages to help share information throughout the Aboriginal mapping community.

CIBC Aboriginal Banking - A new web site dedicated to assisting Aboriginal people attain financial self-sufficiency.

First Nations Networking - 100% Native owned and operated Information Technology (I.T.) Company based in Thunder Bay, Ontario - offers premier computer networking services for First Nation communities, businesses, organizations, and dwellings.

First Nations Bank - Full service bank owned by Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN) and TD Bank.

Makivik Corporation - Corporation owned and controlled by the people of Northern Quebec.

Native Reflections - Aboriginal owned company specializing in calendars, posters and greeting cards. Themes range from traditional to contemporary.

Native Design Services - a wholly aboriginal-owned company, dedicated to providing computer graphics, desktop publishing, web design and web hosting services for entrepreneurs, the SOHO (Small Office/Home Office) market, small to medium size businesses and non-profit organizations.

Peace Hills Trust - Canada's Native-owned financial institution. Check it out for branch locations, interest rates and more.

Pemmican Publishing - A not-for-profit Métis publishing house located in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Quaaout Resort & Conference Centre - Along the shoreline of Little Shuswap Lake lies a place so rich in tradition and hospitality, it is unlike any other resort on earth. The Quaaout Resort & Conference Centre is the pride of the Little Shuswap Indian Band. Unique sights, aromatic delights and people as warm as the sun await you.

Tachini Drums - Makers of Native American drums - complete or in frames in a variety of sizes and finishes.


International Indigenous Issues

Aborigine News - check out this great resource for news and information for indigenous peoples worldwide - not just Aborigines.

Cultural Survival - a non-profit organization founded to defend the human rights and cultural autonomy of indigenous peoples and oppressed ethnic minorities.

Samefolket - The journal of Sami affairs, the oldest native and indigenous controlled publication in the world.

The Sami - A site created to share information on Sami culture, language, arts, current issues and history.

Saami Web - new site on world indigenous issues, rights and news.

New Zealand - University of Waikato Library collection of Native Maori related material.

Australia and More - Collection of information and links pertaining to indigenous peoples throughout the world.

South Pacific Peoples Foundation - SPPF has developed into Canada's principal organization working with Pacific Island peoples.

Achievers

Welcome to Windspeaker's collection of articles featuring the achievements of outstanding individuals










Book Reviews

Each year AMMSA and Windspeaker reviews dozens of books relating to Aboriginal/ Native Canadian news, issues and culture. Those reviews are published in print and online.

If you are an author or publisher and would like us to consider a particular book for review, you will need to send us a promotional copy.

Please contact us at news @ ammmsa.com for shipping information prior to sending us a review copy. We are not responsible for books lost or misdirected in nthe mail and due to time limitations we cannot review all books.


2014 Review: Medicine Walk

Medicine Walk

Medicine Walk

Richard Wagamese

(Published by McClelland and Stewart.)

Review by Shari Narine

 

Set with the backdrop of the BC wilderness, author Richard Wagamese
intricately weaves the hardship of the physical journey with the
emotional journey as estranged father and son travel a rocky ascending
path to the beginning of understanding and forgiveness.

Franklin Starlight has grown up knowing little about his father Eldon
and nothing about his mother.  Frank’s caregiver, or the old man, has
provided “the kid” with everything he needs, from a grounding in First
Nation’s culture that the old man is not part of to an understanding of
the value of hard work. The old man’s need to care for the kid becomes
clearer as the story unfolds.

Eldon Starlight is a man haunted by his decisions and the love he
lost. When Eldon asks Frank to take him on his final journey so he can
be laid to rest in the traditional Ojibway manner, Frank grudgingly
complies out of duty and not love.

What transpires is an awakening for both the 16-year-old and his
dying father.  After years of bottling up his feelings and experiences,
Eldon finally lives up to his name. Starlight, he was told by his
boyhood friend Jimmy, is the name “given to them that get teachin’s from
Star People” and these people are meant to be teachers and
storytellers. But up until this point, Eldon has only been able to deal
with the harsh secrets he holds through alcohol and it is dying through
“the drink” that has spurred this final journey.

Eldon tells Frank the secret he has kept about Jimmy, both of them
having served in the Korean War, and he also tells the story of Frank’s
mother.  These incidences combine to lead Eldon to delivering a newly
born baby into the arms and home of the old man. It is the old man who
names the baby Franklin, after Benjamin Franklin, who “was trying to
catch lightning. Said he knew the world would change if he caught it.
Took courage … to want something for others like that.”

In the end, Frank is left with a feeling he cannot understand, but
the start of forgiveness for the man, who has always let him down. Frank
also comes to put into words what he has always known: that the old man
is his father.

The pieces slot together to deliver the larger story of what has
brought Eldon to the point of dying from the drink and in so doing,
Wagamese is careful to relate the tale of a man, who initially the
reader judges as just another drunk and deadbeat dad, but for whom the
reader comes to feel compassion and empathy. 

Wagamese raises questions about how we move throughout life. Is it
what we prove each day, as the old man says, or is whether we choose to
run away or run to, as Eldon says. Or is what Frank has learned – that
loss can be dealt with in different ways and both define how life is
lived.

Wagemese’s tale of love and loss and moving into forgiveness is
strengthened by the depth of his characters. It is a harsh life that
Eldon lives, and a hard-working life that the kid and the old man lead
and Wagemese’s choice of language, the beauty of his words convey their
reality.

2014 Review: We Are Born with the Songs Inside Us

We Are Born With The Songs Inside US

We Are Born with the Songs Inside Us

By Katherine Palmer Gordon

(Published by Harbour Publishing)

Review by Shari Narine

 

Recent health developments surrounding former Vancouver Canucks’
hockey player Gino Odjick is a clear indication that he is a man, who
has broken through the racial divide.

Odjick is one of 16 First Nations people in British Columbia
highlighted in Katherine Palmer Gordon’s book We Are Born with the Songs
Inside Us. And Odjick’s song is strong.

Odjick, who is Algonquin from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nations
in Quebec, is claimed by Gordon as a west coast face because upon
retiring from hockey in 2002, Odjick made B.C. his home. Gordon refers
to Odjick as “put(ting) his money where  his mouth is, investing in
numerous initiatives and partnerships supporting First Nations
development and employment.” Odjick’s commitment to bettering other
peoples’ lives was recognized by fans, who gathered outside Vancouver
General Hospital to show their respect when Odjick made it known through
the Canucks website that he had been diagnosed with AL amyloidosis, a
rare terminal disease.  And Odjick, despite shortness of breath, went
outside to acknowledge his fans, once more showing his commitment to
others.

“I believe that seeing us as human beings, as people with our own
unique perspectives and lives, is a fundamental first step toward
understanding who we are, rejecting false and imposed stereotypes, and
ultimately reaching reconciliation,” writes former Assembly of First
Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo in the foreward of We Are Born with
the Songs Inside Us.

It is this connection between First Nations people and the rest of
Canada that Gordon strives to relay through the array of people, whose
lives she celebrates.

Reading about these people, who range from artists to
environmentalists to scientists to actors, it is clear that they have
one thing in common: a belief in the importance of their cultural
heritage in all aspects of their lives. However, not all of them were
raised with this belief. Some of them came to this understanding through
trial.  But all of them are now at that point and it is no accident
that they are successful both in their professional and personal lives.

Gordon does not gloss over the struggle that continues for First
Nations people when it comes to etching out a place for themselves.
Individual stories talk about growing up in the face of racism and
continuing the battle to be respected.

What stands out about Gordon’s collection of people is that they
exist in the modern-day realm and whether the reader is Aboriginal or
non-Aboriginal, references to such events as the 2008 residential school
apology from Prime Minister Stephen Harper or the Idle No More
movement, are relevant today. This is not a collection to be considered a
history book.

By highlighting the people she has chosen and their variety of
careers, Gordon also highlights that First Nations people are active
participants in today’s society and have a bright future.  First Nations
people are by no means to be relegated to the past.

Writes Gordon, “… there really are literally thousands upon thousands
of creative, energetic, ordinary and extraordinary and inspirational
people in this country who happen to be of First Nations heritage and
are simply living their lives…”

Writes Atleo, “We need these stories to be told, read and celebrated.”

2015 Review: A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle

 Cree Healer and His MEdicine Bundle

 

Healer passes his knowledge on to youth

Written by Russell Willier

Reviewed by Dianne Meili 
Windspeaker Contributor

Hoping to help young people, Indigenous healer Russell Willier teamed
up with anthropologist David Young once again to produce an excellent
book — A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle: Revelations of Indigenous
Wisdom – Healing Plants, Practices, and Stories—that preserves Cree
medicinal knowledge, plant by plant.

Following the 1989 release of Cry of The Eagle, a book tracking
Willier’s life as a traditional healer and his treatment of 10 patients
afflicted with psoriasis, the duo this time enlists botanist Robert
Rogers to provide commentary on folk uses and the explicit properties of
61 plants in Willier’s repertoire.

As a teenager, the healer rejected the responsibility that came with
accepting his grandfather’s medicine bundle. In his 30s, however, aging
medicine people convinced him to abandon his everyday life in favour of
studying their healing methods to help preserve their knowledge.

Cree cosmology figures large in Willier’s approach to healing; he
describes his spiritual views with the help of diagrams. He also
discusses how and where he finds his plants and herbs, offers practical
advice on how to approach a healer, and laments the loss of natural
habitats where his wild medicines grow.

Willier’s favourite healing stories are engaging, especially the one
about the call he received from the family of a dying Elder who saw
spirits emerging from a round flying vehicle “with little windows” to
collect him.

Through Young’s research diary, we ride along with them on a 1,000 km
journey across northern Alberta to collect plants in July. The men slog
through bogs and ride quads on rutted roads to locate medicine, along
the way visiting with Willier’s old mentor, and taking photographs of
flowers, stems and roots.

From “ice cream trees” (Trembling Aspen whose sweet-tasting cambium
tastes like honeydew melon) to “frog pants” (the carnivorous pitcher
plant), Russell provides information about how traditional Cree people
interacted with various †plants, herbs and trees. Rogers provides
additional information about uses and properties of each plant, while
nearly 200 of Young’s color photos illustrate how they appear in the
summer and fall.

The authors revisit their 1986 Psoriasis Research project in the
book’s final section, relying on dramatic before-and-after photos to
help demonstrate the effectiveness of natural plant medicine on severe
skin eruptions.

Six of 10 patients improved significantly over the course of seven
months, one of whom was completely cured of psoriasis on his hands.

Maps and descriptions of Northern Alberta locales where Willier finds
his medicine plants underscore his generous wish to guide young people
in using them. There’s also an index of referenced plants in English,
Latin and Cree, plus a list of references cited in the book, published
by North Atlantic Books, 2015.

Fully accomplishing what it sets out to do, the book offers evidence
that traditional medicine really works, and aspiring healers can
reference text, pictures, and maps to identify and locate them.
Providing, that is – as Willier repeatedly stresses in the book – that
humans stop destroying the habitat of wild, medicinal plants.

Photo caption:
A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle: Revelations of Indigenous Wisdom
– Healing Plants, Practices, and Stories - Written by Russell Willier

2015 Review: Autumn Leaf

 Autumn Leaf

 

Action-packed and breezy read with Autumn Leaf

Written by Ken Gervais 
Published by Pemmican Publications

Reviewed by Shari Narine 
Windspeaker Contributor

 

Autumn Leaf is the story of a friendship that develops when
three people are thrown together by circumstance in remote British
Columbia. However, like the leaf that floats on the wind, author Ken
Gervais chooses to keep the story breezy instead of delving into the
psyche of three troubled individuals, who choose not to be blown in
every direction but to take control of their paths.

The story, published by Pemmican Publications Inc., revolves around
one-time Commonwealth middleweight boxing champion Victor, now 54. It’s
easy to assume that Victor is a washed up boxer, never having been able
to recover from his bout of fame. But that isn’t the case. As the story
unfolds, it is revealed that Victor’s medic-on-the-move gig came about
because of the tragic loss of his son followed closely by the death of
his wife. Victor had a life after boxing, has money from boxing, and has
a grown daughter, who lives in Vancouver with her two children and
husband. As Victor later tells Pauline, one of the two young people he
befriends, he chose not to be around his grandchildren because they
didn’t deserve to be exposed to a man, who was always sad.

Pauline is a young, recovering drug addict, whose brother, a drug
dealer, has disappeared. She expects he has been murdered. Pauline takes
to Victor’s lessons of self-defence in only the way a woman fighting
for her life can and she repays Victor, grudgingly, by helping Victor
steal painkillers so Victor can properly treat the workers at the camp
he is stationed at.

Sean is the third member of this motley crew. He is the good looking
First Nations man that talks Victor into heading up to Fort Nelson to
work at the camp and introduces Victor to Pauline. Sean ends up
idolizing Victor and hooking up long term with Pauline.††

Autumn Leaf is not short on action. It moves quickly from
one action scene to the next, from Victor being knocked out in the bar
brawl that opens the story to Pauline knifing Victor’s attacker at the
work camp. Gervais establishes the physical setting of the work camp
well, which is where most of the story takes place, but he fails to set
up the emotional and mental aspects of working in an isolated camp. Had
he connected the characters in their isolation to the barrenness of the
wintry north, the story would have been rich.

Gervais only skims the surface of Victor and Pauline and barely
touches on Sean. Pauline is the character with the most growth, changing
from a drug addict to someone, who decides to live a clean life. Her
motivations are unclear and her struggle is not chronicled. Victor’s
attachment to these two twenty-somethings is equally unclear. He bemoans
connections and being hurt by relationships, yet he accepts the
friendship that Pauline, in particular, wants to give.

Autumn Leaf is a novella and Gervais’ debut work. Novellas
are a tricky length of work. They don’t have to be as tightly woven as a
short story but there’s not as much room to play as with a novel.
Gervais’ characters are flawed but endearing, and the setting of the
story is compelling. Deeper writing and stronger editing would have
produced an absorbing study in characters and settings. Instead, Autumn Leaf is an easy-read action novel.

2015 Review: Bearskin Diary - A novel

 Bearskin Diary

Honest, profane, difficult look at the 60’s Scoop

Book written by Carol Daniels


Reviewed by Andrea Smith 
Windspeaker Contributor

A novel recently published by well-known Canadian journalist Carol
Daniels brings to light issues surrounding missing and murdered
Indigenous women.

Bearskin Diary is the story of a young girl who was taken
from her family by the Canadian government, and placed in foster care
during the 1960’s. To Daniels, the “60’s Scoop” was one of the last
great efforts at the assimilation of Aboriginal Canadians, but the
effect of that historic act left a devastating mark.

“There’s lot of things people aren’t going to like… there’s
sexuality, and some really ugly behavior,” said Daniels. “Not
necessarily from the main character, though she does her fair share. But
it’s a really frank look at racism, and a brutal look at what First
Nations have to go through,” she said.

Daniels, who often writes children’s literature and short stories,
acknowledges the book is much darker than many of her other works. But
she also acknowledges because the issues raised in the book are real
issues, faced by real people, being honest and sometimes even profane is
important.

The plight of the main character, which includes broken family ties,
experiences with abuse, and the erasure of her identity—all
after-effects of the 60’s Scoop—is talked about candidly in the book,
and according to Daniels, for good reason.

“Sometimes I think ‘What if anyone had done that to me?’ I was a
single Aboriginal woman with children, and if they came and said ‘You’re
not married, you’re not capable of taking care of these kids,’ I think
‘Oh my God, that would have destroyed me’,” said Daniels.

The novel has actually been in the works for nearly eight years, but
raising three children, and working as a full-time news anchor kept her
from finishing earlier. Her children being her biggest concern in life,
gave her extra empathy for her characters’ griefs, and outside research
added fuel to her fire.

“The young lady in the novel is placed with a Ukrainian family, so I
had to do research on the customs you would have in your family… I
didn’t know Ukrainian families were put in concentration camps in Canada
during World War I. That made for a good story because the grandmother
could identify with her granddaughter (the main character) who was
Cree,” she said.

Even Daniels’ own artwork is featured on the cover. The piece, in
real life, is a 5-ft by 4-ft painting modelled after a story told to her
by an Aboriginal Elder. The Elder vividly recalls running to hide as a
child, every time he heard the Indian Agent’s vehicle driving up along
the road near his home.

The man’s experiences took place before the 1960’s, but because the
government was already taking Aboriginal children from their families to
be placed in Indian residential schools, that fear was already
commonplace.

“It’s made with dirt, and acrylic, and all sorts of materials,” said
Daniels of her painting. “And if you look closely, there are skulls in
the body of the Indian Agent. I’m happy they went with my image, because
for the story of the scoop up, it was the same thing…” she said of the
similarities between stolen children in the residential school system,
and the stolen children of the 1960’s.

Daniels’ novel has actually been placed on the winter syllabus at the
First Nation’s University in Regina. And she is eager to educate the
public about the larger picture behind her novel.

As for her favorite part of the story, she is most proud of the fact
that the main character, Andy, at one point is finally able to come to
terms with her life experiences, and challenge some of the identity
issues she has picked up along the way.

“She goes to a powwow,” said Daniels. “And she’s terrified because
she doesn’t know what to expect. But before you get to that part you
realize she’s got a lot of ideas that are not hers that have come to her
because of her brown skin...† And she’s touched by her experience, in a
good way that changes her life,” she said. 

This is where Daniels really hopes she’ll be able to reach people.
While the novel is only one year of the main character’s life, it’s the
year that is most significant. Daniels hope that as the main character
unravels some of her trauma, readers, too, will find a new understanding
of themselves, or people they might know.

“If there are people out there who don’t know anything about our
culture, it might serve as a starting point to learn about us,” she
said.

“And if you happen to be an adult who doesn’t know anything about the
culture because of the 60’s scoop, I’m hoping they’ll say ‘Gee, I need
to learn, and undo some of the things that were said to me…’ And stop
believing somehow they aren’t worthy’,” she said.

2015 Review: Languages of our land - Indigenous Poems and Stories from Quebec

 Languages of our Land

Rich and compelling, writers reach emotional depth

Languages of Our Land 
Published by Banff Centre Press

Reviewed by Shari Narine 
Windspeaker Contributor

Languages of Our Land is a compelling collection of works by
12 emerging and established Indigenous writers living in Quebec,
published by Banff Centre Press.

The original work is in French, which is included side-by-side with
the English translation. For English only readers, the English
translation is rich and captivating.

And for lucky readers of French, one can only imagine how much richer
and more captivating both the prose and the poetry – especially the
poetry, with the special attention that must be paid to rhythm and flow–
must be.

And what if the stories could have been related in the true first
languages of the authors – Wendat, Innu-aimun, Cree or Algonquin? The
writing would have been even more beautiful. However, although the
writers did not use their mother tongues, it is evident that the writing
is influenced by the lived culture and the original language.

The writers have all been touched by the Indian residential school
experience. Indeed, a couple of the poets use the word “genocide” to
talk about what happened to their families, their communities, their way
of life.

“Cultural genocide” was the phrase spoken by Truth and Reconciliation
Commission Chair Murray Sinclair to sum up the federal government’s
policy of Indian residential schools.

In “Dust of our Blood,” poet Jean Sioui writes, “My father … /One day
you were the trapper/the next day you were the trapped/My father …/One
day you were the hunter/the next day you were the hunted.” It is easy to
feel the loss of a way of life and of culture in those few simple
lines. The work of Sioui, who is Wendat from the Bear Clan, is the first
in the collection and sets the tone for what is to come.

In “Lost Origin,” Manon Nolin’s despair is clear in her words: “I
turned away from my origins/I lost my heart of a child/I don’t know who I
am/Am I Innu?/Am I other? I am rootless.”

The way of life, of what it has become, is captured honestly in the
thoughts of an old woman:  “Poor Marie trying to get away from her man
when the bottle turned him mean.” Simple, straightforward, and bare is
the work provided by Carole Labarre in the short story, “Pishimuss.”

These poignant words capture the struggle of a people who have lost
seven generations to Indian residential schools. With no culture, no
language, no spiritual practises, where does the strength and direction
come from to move beyond hurt and self-destructive coping techniques?

Not all the poems and short stories are about loss.

“Though the shadows of residential schools/hovers still over our
communities/I know today’s youth will find there/a way to free
themselves,” writes Real Junior Leblanc in the poem “Uprooted
Childhood.”

And in “Day by Day,” Melina Vassiliou writes about hope: “my son’s
pure gaze/his winning smile/my son’s pure gaze/my winning smile/day by
day.”

In the greys and blacks of loss, the writers also share the bright colours of hope.

Writes Virginia Pesemapeo Bordeleau in the poem “Women’s Declaration
of Peace,” the final selection of the anthology, “Peace is an answer/to
all the wounds inflicted/on our dignity,/day after day./Peace is the
condition of our healing.”

Languages of Our Land was written at the Banff Centre in
Alberta. Says editor Susan Ourious in her introduction, “In the majestic
setting of the Rockies, the chosen Canada Council writers were given an
opportunity to reunite with the land, the river, the forests and the
sky.” That reunion has created a stirring collection of prose and
poetry.

2015 Review: My Story: The Riverton Rifle

 The Riverton Rifle

Hockey’s Reggie Leach a straight shooter in new book

Written by Reggie Leach

Reviewed by Sam Laskaris 
Windspeaker Contributor

 

When he was in the prime of his professional playing days, Reggie
Leach was one of the National Hockey League’s most prolific scorers.

It’s little wonder then that Leach continues to be a straight shooter
these days. His recently released autobiography published by Greystone
Book called The Riverton Rifle tells it just like it was.

He manages to stay humble and doesn’t omit the bad parts, which
included his excessive drinking, the breakup of his first two marriages
and a stint at a rebab facility in New Jersey.

The Riverton Rifle concludes with a chapter titled Full Circle, in
which Leach, who has been sober for 30 years, talks about his current
life. Married for a third time, Leach lives in Aundeck Omni Kaning on
Manitoulin Island in Ontario.

He spends a good chunk of his time assisting his son Jamie, who was
also a pro hockey player, with the Shoot To Score hockey school. The
elder Leach is also a sought after motivational speaker, who prides
himself on being an Aboriginal role model.

Leach preaches the importance of making good choices in life. As he
himself knows, at times bad decisions are made. He stresses to never
blame anyone else for those choices.

Leach, a member of the 1975 Stanley Cup champion Philadelphia Flyers,
netted a career high 61 goals in 80 matches the following season.

The Ojibwe, who grew up in the Manitoba community of Riverton, played in more than 1,000 games during his 13-season NHL career.

Leach devotes a chapter in The Riverton Rifle (a nickname he acquired
for his accurate shooting) to his championship season with the Flyers.

The chapter, simply dubbed The Cup, includes numerous recollections
of the Flyers’ playoff run. Though he was part of a Philadelphia club
nicknamed The Broad Street Bullies because of their aggressive and
intimidating play, one can’t help but secretly cheer for him as he
describes the pandemonium inside the club’s locker room after clinching
the Cup.

Leach also details the bedlam in the ensuing championship parade
through Philly streets, which included a nude woman running alongside
the players on the route.

Even those who did not grow up as Flyers’ fans can be forgiven for
feeling happiness for Leach as he concludes the chapter by stating how
special it was – even more so today than back then – to have his
childhood dream come to fruition thanks to plenty of hard work.

The expression It Takes A Village To Raise A Child is certainly true
in Leach’s case. He was born to a pair of young unmarried parents in
Winnipeg. But when he was a mere few weeks old he was sent to live with
his paternal grandparents who raised him in Riverton.

Starting from a young age, members of the community would give Leach some odd jobs to do.

It wasn’t until Leach was 11 years old that he found out the man who
would drop by for visits for a few days was his biological father.

Despite ups and downs, The Riverton Rifle details how Leach became a winner on and off the ice.

Personalized signed copies of The Riverton Rifle ($35, plus shipping)
are available by contacting Leach directly at zreg27@yahoo.com or by
sending him a message via Facebook through his page at
www.facebook.com/reggie.leach.16

Photo caption: My Story: Reggie Leach, The Riverton Rifle, Written by Reggie Leach, Published by Greystone Book

 

Reggie Leach

2009 Review: Meshom and The Little One

Meshom and the Little One Book Review Cover

Children’s book promotes culture and respect
Meshom and The Little One
By Elaine J. Wagner
Illustrated by: Marie-Micheline Hamelin
Theytus Books
56 Pages, (sc)
Ages 3 and up

Review by L. Christine Suthers

Meshom and The Little One is published by Theytus Books, a First Nations publishing house based in Penticton British Columbia. Theytus Books produces and promotes Aboriginal authors, illustrators and artists. Meshom and The Little One is Elaine J Wagner’s first book.

It is full of vivid descriptions of landscape and expresses the feelings of her characters’ with we can relate. In Meshom and The Little One,  Wagner has found a way to enlighten us to some of the Ojibwa culture and language that adds an educational element and enhances the story.

The illustrations in this book are the work of Marie-Micheline Hamelin. They complement the story of Meshom and The Little One perfectly. The drawings are playful and full of life.  Hamelin has captured the essence of the story and the love shown by the characters in her drawings.

Meshom and The Little One is a story about a young Ojibwa girl, Shawna, and her difficult time adjusting to moving across the country with her mother. Her new home is very different from what she is use to. The small town on the prairies in Manitoba changes to a city near the mountains of British Columbia. Ten-year-old Shawna is sad and lonely. She misses her friends and cousins but she misses her grandparents the most.

Shawna sees her Meshom (Grandfather) and Kokum (Grandmother) when they fly in to visit and to celebrate her birthday. Her grandfather gives her an unpainted plaster figure of a Ka-agashinshidig, a Little One, to watch over and protect her. He explains to her how the Little Ones’ were tricksters and how they liked to play jokes and mischievous games. Meshom told Shawna that the Ka-agashinshidig was as unique as she was and that she should paint it by herself.

After her grandparents leave, Shawna and her mother visit a craft store and buy paints. Shawna sets about painting her Little One. She paints him in the colours that remind her of the traditional clothing of the Ojibwa. While she is painting she thinks of her Meshom and Kokum, the Elders, the lake her grandfather fished, and the colour of her father’s eyes who died when she was very young.

Shawna talks to the Little One while she is painting. She tells it of the colours she is using, what she is feeling, and the friends she was looking forward to making when she started school. Shawna was happy.

She names her Little One Ogi-ma, which means Man of Esteem. As Shawna finishes painting Ogi-ma, Meshom and Kokum surprise her with a return visit. Her grandfather brought another a Ka-agashinshidig to paint and as a friend for Ogi-ma. Shawna names her new Little One Ogi-ma-kwe which means Woman of High Esteem.

Meshom and The Little One is an endearing story with characters full of love for each other and the Ojibwa culture. You and your children will enjoy this book. It is definitely worth the read.

2009 Review: Motorcycles and Sweetgrass

Trickster plays with small-town minds in Otter Lake

Book Review
By Christine McFarlane
Motorcycles and Sweetgrass
Author: Drew Hayden Taylor

Award-winning playwright, columnist and comedy-sketch creator, Drew Hayden Taylor from Curve Lake First Nation, Ont., is at his fast-paced, comedic best with his latest book

Motorcycles & Sweetgrass, which is set in the fictional sleepy Anishnawbe community of Otter Lake.

The premise addresses many issues that First Nations people currently deal with, including community politics, identity, mythology and intergenerational legacies—the impact of children removed from their communities to attend residential school, and the problems that caused, including alcoholism, lost retention of traditional ways, repressed memories of long ago hurts, and rifts in familial relations. Throw in a few Windigos and a new government granted land parcel for the band that unleashes a swarm of local lobbyists with competing schemes for development and you’ve got the makings of a funny and compelling story by Hayden Taylor.

The reader is allowed into the life of Maggie Second as she tries to juggle several roles, including motherhood and the stresses that come with being in a very public role as chief, a position she inherited after the sudden loss of her husband in a boating accident.

Maggie finds that the issues she often deals with in her political life drift into her personal life. She is distracted by the demands of her job and the impending loss of her mother and a wayward son Virgil, who tends to skip more school than he attends.

Maggie also finds that the paperwork involved with the newly-acquired land parcel is more of a hassle than it should be. She has to deal with “three levels of government, four, if you included the reserve, that has to sign off on the transfer. She finds that most non-Natives believe the idea of granting the band more land is an absurd concept. After all, “five hundred years of colonization had told them you took the land away from Native people, you didn’t let them buy it back.”

The stage is set as Maggie’s focus shifts when a six-foot-plus dreamboat riding a 1953 humdinger of an Indian motorcycle arrives in the community. The motorcycle rider is possibly the mischief-making incarnation of the Ojibwa’s trickster figure Nanabush, and the town of Otter Lake turns upside with a silliness that they have never experienced before.

No one really seems to know what’s going on except for the raccoons that track this bike around like a posse, and they’re not happy.

Taylor writes this book with comedic ease, but he pokes at some very serious issues, such as language. In one scene, Maggie Second and her dying mother are speaking in their native Ojibway and the book reads “she spoke it like all the old-timers did, with strength and confidence, not hesitantly and softly like the youngsters who took the language in university, if they took it at all.”

Hayden Taylor’s book generates much thought about small-town small-mindedness, and he mixes it with the problems brought by a trickster figure let loose in a community already preoccupied with fooling itself.

The book’s real strength is the underlying account of a community struggling to weave a traditional past with some kind of meaningful future. In these matters Taylor’s humour yields to a tone that is variously caustic and melancholy.

Hayden Taylor’s Motorcycles and Sweetgrass was the Governor General’s Award nomination for fiction in 2010.
It is published by Alfred A. Knopf Canada, and can be purchased at your nearest bookstore.

2009 Review: Shedding Skins

Shedding Skins Book Review Cover

Poetry book breaths inspiration and reflection

Shedding Skins
By Trevino L. Brings Plenty, Steve Pacheo, Joel Waters, and Luke Warm Water
Michigan State University Press
123 pages (sc)
$15.95

Review by Thomas J. Bruner

In order to illustrate the power of poetry, one should have passion, must know pain, and must be able to breathe it onto the page. Shedding Skins is poetry in the truest sense of the word.

Shedding Skins is the brilliant result of a consortium of four Sioux poets. Each one of them bring something unique and powerful to the pages. Some of the poems play with the mind, while others punch you in the stomach with their brutal honesty.

“I don’t dream anymore, I only remember.” – an excerpt from Building Rooms To Sell Dreams, by Trevino L Brings Plenty.

The first of the poets is Trevino L. Brings Plenty, who not unlike his name brings plenty of thoughts to the book. His poetry is both clever and sharp, in the way that he conveys a thought and could force one to either laugh or cry, but at the same time, could have you shaking your head in disbelief at how he managed to say it. His poetry manages to be the words when everyone else is speechless.

“The afternoon smell of fish frying in the kitchen, masking the smells of the night before” – excerpt from Indian Country, by Steve Pacheo.

Steve Pacheo, as second contributor to this book,  cleverly speaks of old family memories, and you kind of get the feeling that he wishes that his past didn’t hold so much pain and dysfunction while at the same time you sense a thinly veiled fondness for it as well. It is yesterday’s memories spoken from today’s mind.
“I will never put anything before the importance of my own skin” – excerpt from Wannabe, by Joel Waters
The third poet is Joel Waters who conveys either the pride of being Native American or the lack thereof. The anger, pain, or impatience with the world can be felt with every carefully chosen word.
“This has been the gospel according to Luke Warm Water” –excerpt from The Jesus Of Pine Ridge, by Luke Warm Water.

Last, but certainly not least in the quartet of poets is Luke Warm Water who appears to be the most seasoned of the poets. His poems are the “full meal deals” of poetry and require a sit down and read regimen to gather the true meaning. Shedding Skins is like walking through four abandoned homes with every memory in tact. All four poets are brilliant  regarding their ability to turn something as ugly as the past into something as beautiful as a poem.

2010 Review: America's Gift

America's Gift Book Review cover

Review by Shari Narine
America’s Gift
By Kathe Rothe and Denis Vaugeois
Published by Baraka Books

December 2009

Originally published in 1992 in French, America’s Gift, by Kathe Rothe and Denis Vaugeois, came out in English in 2009.

The authors say the book “started with the idea it would be built on etymology,” and while it is, it’s also a strong testament to what Native Americans contributed to European culture and the enduring quality of those contributions.

The goal of the book is twofold, say Rothe and Vaugeois: to both point out what the Indigenous people gave (both willingly and unwillingly) to the explorers and to look at what the “discovery” of the Americas meant to the rest of the world.

The fact that the first Europeans, who arrived in the Americas, tried to learn the Indigenous language, is one reason why many words spoken by the Indigenous peoples became part of the mainstream language. It is believed that the Native people of the Americas spoke 2,200 different dialects.

It is fascinating to learn that the food we eat, the clothes we wear, our system of government, the animals we watch and the stars above our heads all have a heavy influence in the Indigenous language.

The book lists approximately 300 words in easy-to-follow alphabetical order and includes the language of origin. As well, an easy-to-use reference in the back of the book separates the words into their languages of origin as well as subjects such as animals, plants and objects.

The Algonkian language supplied the most words to French and English, just a small sampling being the common North American animals woodchuck, opossum, moose and raccoon.

Much of our fruit and vegetables have their roots in Native American words: papaya (Carib), avocado (Nahuatl), squash (Naragansett), and potato (Taino).

Other words that are common in the mainstream household include toboggan (Micmac), barbecue (Taino), tobacco (Maya), and hammock (Carib).

Even obviously Native American words are part of the mainstream language: sasquatch (Salish), moccasin (Ojibway), and anorak (Inuktitut).

Authors Rothe, who is a translator, and Vaugeois, who is a historian, have worked together for 15 years producing history books.

America’s Gift is a strong collaboration that uses the strength of both Rothe and Vaugeois to present an interesting look at Native American linguistics, its longevity and its adaptability and how it has made the English and French languages stronger, and in some ways, poetic.

The way in which America’s Gift is organized makes it not only an easy read but also an easy reference guide.

2010 Review: Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong

Everything you know about Indians is Wrong Boor Review cover

Review by Shari Narine
Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong
By Paul Chaat Smith
Published by University of Minnesota Press 2009

December 2009

Paul Chaat Smith's Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong is a hard hitting collection of essays that examines mainstream society's inability to clearly understand the significance of Indian civilization prior to the coming of the Europeans and mainstream society's need to continue to perpetuate the myths and stereotypes.

While Smith's essays are compelling, they are at times confusing and contradictory.

Perhaps the most important point to keep in mind is Smith's comment in his Afterword:  "I continue to find buried history, pop music, failed revolution, television, and future that never quite arrived subjects of endless interest. But the truth is, I'm not really the same guy who wrote these essays." The changes in Smith can be seen in this very collection, which spans from 1992 to 2008.

Smith lambastes mainstream culture in its depiction of Indians in media, all the way through from film and television to history books and art – and hence the title of his collection of essays. However, Smith doesn't offer answers and perhaps he doesn't because he believes filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk is correct when he approaches his work with questions and not statements. Writes Smith, "Too many Indian artists approach their work with statements, not questions. And the statements are along the lines of: This is who we are, and this is what happened to us."

However, on one hand Smith clearly states that much of the depiction of Natives is through the hand of the white man and thus must be approached with healthy skepticism. But in noting that there is now a first generation of Indian artists, Smith vacillates on whether this new generation is doing any better of a job in depicting Indians. Too many Indian artists, he says, attempt to walk the two worlds of mainstream and Indian and only succeed in producing confusion.

Smith is probably no more critical of the media than he is in his take on film. He points out that the early westerns depict Indians in the stereotypical fashion, moving from savage to noble savage. He also notes that westerns are the creation of white men not Indians. Smith is vocal in his dislike of the critically acclaimed "Dances With Wolves." While he says, "An Indian film aesthetic must challenge the manufactured images if it seeks to represent our lives and experiences," he knocks Indians for taking the movies too seriously. Says Smith,  We've crossed the line somewhere and forgotten that it's entertainment and not a vehicle invented to first denigrate and then uplift our race."

However as critical as Smith is of the various media that are used to depict Indians, whether it be at the hand of whites or Indians, he does point out a handful of Indians that he thinks are getting the job done. Along with Kunuk, Smith mentions conceptual artist James Luna and in particular his "outrageous and brilliant" installation The Artifact Piece; Kanai artist Faye HeavyShield and her installation blood, which premiered in the Southern Alberta Art Gallery in Lethbridge; and Baco Ohama's Miyoshi, which also opened in Lethbridge.

Smith's essays also touch on the Indian demonstrations in the United States, particularly the take over of Alcatraz Island in 1969; the creation of the American Indian Movement; and the significance of the Nixon administration.

Smith's writing could be seen as a throwback to the title of his book. Indian people are known to have a dry wit and caustic sense of humour; throughout Smith's early essays that wit and sarcasm comes through. It makes the reading of his essays interesting, but also challenging, because with his tongue-in-cheek approach it's sometimes difficult to know exactly what he's being serious about.

Smith, a Comanche, is the associate curator at the National Museum of the American Indian of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

2010 Review: Fatty Legs, a true story

Young girl lets nothing stop her from reading

By Lillian Blackstar
Windspeaker Contributor
TORONTO

Fatty Legs a true story - book cover

Fatty Legs, a true story written by Margaret Pokiak Fenton and Christy Jordan Fenton, has been chosen as the First Nation Communities Read program 2011/12 selected title.

It’s a story of courage and great endurance.

The story was selected by a six-member jury of librarians from First Nation public libraries in Ontario, with support from the Southern Ontario Library Association. It was selected from 29 titles submitted by 13 publishers from across Canada and timed to fit with Ontario Public Library Week (Oct. 16 to Oct. 22).

First Nation Communities Read encourages family literacy and intergenerational storytelling, and promotes the publication, sharing, and understanding of Aboriginal voices and experiences.

Fatty Legs provides readers with a glimpse into the residential school experiences of a young Inuvialuit girl named Olemaun, later known as Margaret Pokiak.
Margaret, now 75, grew up in the northern community of Banks Island in the Northwest Territories. Her family consisted of 16 kids and her parents and subsisted on hunting and trapping.

One day at the age of seven, as her older sister was reading to her, Margaret began to want to go to school. With much pressure put upon her parents from little Margaret, she was allowed to go to the Immaculata Catholic School in Aklavik where she attended from age eight to 12 years of age.

After a few days there, however, she says she wished she had never gone and wanted to return home. She was immediately targeted by a nun who would bully her, and who gave her red stockings to wear to embarrass her in front of everyone. She was the only girl at the school forced to wear them.

From the time of the customary cutting off of the hair, to the other humiliations of institutionalization, Margaret decided to fight back. In the face of bullying and oppression, she learned to knit and sew, an occupation she still does today.

Margaret decided to allow her story to be written when her daughter-in-law convinced her that her story would take others on an empowering journey.

“At first I did not like the idea. I was worried that my grandchildren would know I was naughty at one time,” said Margaret.

She said she was also reluctant for her son to know about her having to wear red stockings. Now Margaret is happy that by sharing her story she is helping others.
Margaret married in 1962 and with her husband had six children. Her co-writer, and wife to her son Garth, is Christy Jordan-Fenton. Christy wanted Margaret to write her touching story, so she helped her to write it.

Today, Christy and Margaret live on little farms beside each other in Fort St. John, B.C. They share their stories, and Margaret still does her baking and does traditional crafts to sell at the local market garden.

Public libraries in Ontario, Nova Scotia, Manitoba, British Columbia, and the Yukon will receive the 2011/12 First Nation Communities Read poster promoting Fatty Legs; A True Story, and 19 other titles recommended for adults and young adults.

Fatty Legs, written in 2010 and illustrated by Liz Amini Holmes, is published by Annick Press and was shared at the Truth and Reconciliation National Event in Halifax.
There is also a sequel that is called A Stranger at Home, and a music video by Keith Secola coming out. Secola was just inducted into the Native American Music Awards Hall of Fame.

2010 Review: she walks for days inside a thousand eyes

she walks for days inside a thousand eyes Book Review cover

Review by Shari Narine
she walks for days inside a thousand eyes: a two-spirit story
By Sharron Proulx-Turner
Turnstone Press, 2008

December 2009

she walks for days inside a thousand eyes: a two-spirit story is a riveting mixture of prose and poetry, myth and modern day. Sharron Proulx-Turner's combination in telling the tale is part of the beauty and intrigue of the two-spirit story.

The story is ambitious; it's a story of confirmation and pride; a plea for two-spirit people to accept their role in today's society as they accepted it in the past. It's a plea to fulfill the roles of leader, mentor, warrior, protector, provider and mediator. It's a plea to accept that "two-spirit people are not a typo but are here for good, for all time to ensure balance in body, mind, heart, spirit."

she walks for days inside a thousand eyes is told in the voices of many as the "fleshly woman" seeks out understanding of who she is in a sweat lodge. Fleshly woman's journey is told through myth, where she learns of the lives of two-spirited people, what they suffered, what they endured, and what they accomplished. At the end, fleshly woman's visions tell her what she must do:  "what you've learned here will return home with you and you're to share this knowledge as far and as wide as your remaining years will allow you."

Part of Proulx-Turner's myth includes the role of the European in shaming the two-spirits, by forcing man-woman unions "without heart and mindlessly label the union of two-spirits an abomination."

Proulx-Turner follows fleshly woman's movements and growth through the words of Small Spotted Eagle, Young Crow, Maw-Caw and Gopher (With One Eff), and fleshly woman addresses her grandmother Germaine on her journey to discovering who she is and what it means to be two-spirits. Proulx-Turner's literary devices make for interesting reading, in which even the prose is as poetic as the verse. And in the end, Proulx-Turner reveals that all her talking, learning animals are poetic devices, much to Young Crow's disappointment. Explains Maw Caw to Young Crow: "you, because you and your ego were brought back to life by the fleshly woman when she was still a girl and you were just a chick-kak. Small Spotted Eagle because she holds the history for the two-spirit women. And me? Because of our centuries with the Metis."

In revealing the proud history of the two-spirits, Proulx-Turner works to convince two-spirited people that they need "to break out of the mold that's been created by centuries of terror."

she walks for days inside a thousand eyes is a journey about learning about one's self and being open to accept what is revealed. And once accepting what has been revealed, the journey continues in using those gifts of who we are. "The fleshly woman is returned to her home knowing the gifts of the two-spirits, and ever so slowly, she'll begin to understand her role, a crucial role in opening the doors that resist opening."

In she walks for days inside a thousand eyes,Proulx-Turner makes it clear that the history of the two-spirits is proud and the future can be just as proud.

Proulx-Turner is a Metis writer raised in the Ottawa River valley. She has taught writing and literature at the University of Calgary and presently resides in Calgary.

2011 Review: Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools—A Memoir

Broken Circle cover

Light fades to dark in residential schools

Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools—A Memoir

By Theodore Fontaine

Published By Heritage House Publishing Company Ltd

Review by Christine McFarlane

 

“Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential SchoolsA Memoir” is a powerful book that gives testimony to the resilience of one residential school survivor and is also a hopeful and inspirational story that tells its readers that one can pick up the shattered pieces of life and use them for good.

Theodore Fontaine lost his family at the age of seven after his parents were forced to leave him at Fort Alexander Residential School, just days after his seventh birthday. It is poignant how he is able to capture the memory of his trip to the residential school, and the reader can envision Fontaine skipping down a dirt road on his reserve between his two parents and the excitement he felt at being able to go to school.

He writes about how he thought that he was on his way to a new adventure.

“I am going to be a ‘school kid.’ I’ll learn to read; I’ll be where my older brothers and sisters were, where they learned new things, coming back smarter, bigger and ready to find jobs and make money like Dad, my uncles and our older cousins. I will be a school kid, and I am excited!”

The excitement he felt quickly changes, however, and his experiences over the next 12 years would shape and control his life for the next 50 years. He recounts the courage it took him to climb up from a darkness that only a survivor of Canada’s residential school system could understand.

While attending residential school, Fontaine realizes that his life would not be his own.

“I would no longer be a son with a family structure. I would be parented by people who’d never known the joy of parenthood and in some cases hadn’t been parented themselves.”

Fontaine explains how the “pounding into their minds that they were less than their keepers took its toll with more than two-thirds of his schoolmates dying early, mostly from lives lived trying to forget.”

Ways of forgetting took form in many harmful behaviors, and while there are many stories about residential schools and the physical, sexual, spiritual and mental abuse endured there, Fontaine does an incredible job of humanizing the story of his experience.

The book confronts the truth and legacy of the Indian residential school. In its writing, Fontaine not only demonstrates the resiliency required to survive such experiences, he has taught himself that there is hope.

2011 Review: Gabriel Dumont: Li Chef Michif in Images and in Words

 

 

New book examines Métis leader through the eyes of his time

Review by Bernadette Friedmann-Conrad Sage Writer REGINA

A new book called Gabriel Dumont: Li Chef Michif in Images and in Words shows the life and times of the Métis leader through a new and different lens.

Author Darren Préfontaine said he wanted to compile this book because there was so much information about Gabriel Dumont in the oral histories and archival records that had never made it into the public sphere.

“The big story has always been about Louis Riel. There are only a couple of biographies on Gabriel Dumont and they don’t talk about how he was viewed by Métis and non-Métis people. So I thought it would make a compelling story how this old rebel, if I may use that term, became a Canadian hero,” said Préfontaine.

The book is a compilation of images and journalistic accounts of Dumont. With the help of staff at the Gabriel Dumont Institute, housed within the University of Regina, Préfontaine worked for three years to assemble photos, artist renderings and newspaper articles from around the world about this Plains Métis hero who was born in the Red River area in 1837 and died near Batoche in 1906. The book also shows material culture related to Dumont’s life such as his pool table, artefacts he had in his possession, and his gravesite.

During their research, Préfontaine’s team was surprised to discover that the 1885 Resistance and Dumont were very well covered in the newspapers and not just all over Canada but throughout the English speaking world. Préfontaine said he found out many things he didn’t know about Dumont before.

“A lot of things came through serendipity during the research. For instance, there was a rich widow in Montreal who proposed to him; he saved some kids in a fire in the 1890s in Montreal, and he looked after orphans in Montana during 1885 — little vignettes like that. There are also some things in the book people might find unsettling, not so much about Gabriel Dumont, but about how 1885 played out,” Préfontaine said.

Until the 1950s Dumont or the Resistance were hardly discussed in books. Préfontaine said Canadian society in general was under the impression that 1885 was over and didn’t need to be talked about; it also wasn’t going to recognize the bad things that had gone on, like how Métis people were marginalized and mistreated and what happened with the road allowance people. In the 1950s a few things changed however.

 “For one, the prime minister at the time, John Diefenbaker, had met Gabriel Dumont as a young child and considered him one of his heroes. This is especially interesting since John A. MacDonald who smashed the Métis and First Nations in 1885 was Diefenbaker’s hero as well. I think that led a lot of people to think that Dumont, even though you may not agree in the end with the actions he took, could be respected as a man of principle.”

The book also includes a reference section that shows the oral traditions and archival documents about Dumont that were used in researching the book. Préfontaine included these in the hopes that readers may get inspired to write their own stories.

“My hope is that once this book is published more images and more things relating to Gabriel Dumont can come to life, and that’ll only increase our knowledge of the man. Not only that, why not write a story about Madeleine Dumont, Gabriel’s wife, why not about Poundmaker, why not Big Bear or Starblanket, why not any leader? The possibilities are endless; the Internet has made it so easy; all the old newspapers have been digitized. You don’t have to live in Saskatoon, Calgary or Toronto any more to have access to the archives to do a book like this.”

 

2011 Review: Louis Riel: The Heretic Poems

 The Heretic Poems cover

Riel, the icon, humanized through poetry

Louis Riel: The Heretic Poems

By Gregory Scofield

Published by Nightwood Editions

Review by Christine McFarlane

 

Louis Riel is a pivotal figure in Canadian history, and those who have never really understood him are taken on a journey by writer Gregory Scofield.

“Louis Riel: The Heretic Poems” is Scofield’s new four-part book.

Metis poet Scofield draws attention to Riel by juxtaposing historical events and quotes with poetic narrative and this allows his readers a glimpse into each part of Riel’s life, beginning with “Le Garcon (The Boy).

This section shows us Riel as a boy sitting on a train in the poem “Trip To Civilization, 1858” with Scofield recounting Riel’s journey to St. Paul, and relaying the thoughts of Louis Riel from his journal notes.

“Twenty eight days we watch the trees grow sparse, and the oxen sway as if their legs are all tendon and marrow.

Finally we reach St. Paul, thank God

And what an exalted sight; to be a pane of glass

In one of the churches, a step at city hall.”

Scofield gives his readers further insight into Riel’s journey by showing us a glimpse of Riel’s thoughts as travels sails by steamboat.

me, Louis Schimdt and Daniel McDougall

by steamboat

we are three crates of prairie dust

sailing down the  Mississippi to Wisconsin

Then by train we go to Chicago.

Me, in a velvet seat. Louis Schmidt at the window.

Daniel McDougall asleep, Sister Valade

Plucking the hairs on her chin

Oh my! Oh my!”

Within the section titled Le President, we witness a reactive Riel in the poem “The Revolutionary.” A note from Sir John A. Macdonald states “the impulsive half-breeds have got spoilt by this emeute (rioting) and must be kept down by a strong hand until they are swamped by the influx of the settlers” and Riel responds.

“Countrymen-

va chier! I say to him, pointing to all

the puppets of Parliament,

va chier!

I devote myself not to a masterpiece

Of rhetoric, a sermon of permission

Nor flowered admonition

What I declare here, to you

Is a sermon of salvation, a coaxing fire

We must set ablaze

A spark!

A flame!

A storm!

Within the section titled “The Spokesman” Riel is revered, and we are witness to another large figure in Metis history, Gabriel Dumont.

Finally in L’Homme D’Etat (The Statesman), the reader becomes a witness to Riel’s prayer before being hanged.

In the poem“The Request” Riel laments:

“This is my fear.

To be put in a box. A poorly chosen box.

One that is constant quarrel over size and shape.

This is my greatest fear”

Scofield’s ability to make his readers become a part of Louis Riel’s life and journey is amazing. His voice is ideally paired with both the subject matter and Riel’s own poetry and as you read each selection of poetry, the life of Louis Riel’s is humanized.

Readers will see Louis Riel outside of being a folk hero and martyr. They see him within various roles, as a young boy, a friend, a husband, a father, lover, a poet and a visionary.

Louis: The Heretic Poems is 96 pages and published by Nightwood Editions, which is an independent publisher distributed and marketed by Harbour Publishing.

2011 Review: Midnight Sweatlodge

Midnight Sweatlodge cover

Healing and struggle are central themes in new book

Midnight Sweatlodge

By Waubgeshig Rice

Published by Theytus Books

Review by Christine McFarlane

 

“Midnight Sweatlodge” is a collection of short stories written by Waubgeshig Rice, a member of Wausasking First Nation and a CBC reporter based in Ottawa.

It tells the tale of a group of young people who have gathered to take part in an ancient Aboriginal ceremony—the sweatlodge.

Each person who takes part in the ceremony looks for healing and gives us a glimpse into the difficulties in his or her life.

Each story in Midnight Sweatlodge reflects a struggle of sorts, whether it is dealing with isolation, loss, an identity crisis, depression or substance abuse. Each person participating in the ceremony takes his turn in baring his soul, recounting painful experiences that have been witnessed.

Within the very first story, “Dust”, the reader learns about two brothers who grew up on their reserve, their closeness and camaraderie apparent, and how their lives change after a standoff in their community when they witness the police shooting of their father.

The two young boys are catapulted from living carefree, playing baseball and swimming with their friends, to dealing with the grief and loss of their father.

Through this story, Rice discusses an issue that is all too familiar for many First Nations communities these days, the terrible toll that comes with the fight for land rights. The story relays both a personal and political side to hanging “onto identity, tradition, the bond between Mother Earth and her children—us,”  and how the death of the brothers’ father impacts the young storyteller sitting around the fire in the sweatlodge. 

In another story, “Bloodlines”, the reader is exposed to the love between a First Nations man and his non-Native girlfriend in a contemporary urban city and how the young man deals with being amongst people not used to hanging out with an Aboriginal person.

The young man says his presence is still a novelty to the urban community around him and how, with his girlfriend, he wants to draw his own bloodlines, be in control of making life and “being able to control how that life turns out.”

For his first book, Rice does a great job in each story by conveying that, though each situation is unique to the individuals, everyone struggles in one way or another and it is possible to heal through sharing with each other.

Rice also exposes non-Native readers to some of the difficulties that young Native people face in Canada, and attempts to break the negative stereotyping of young Aboriginals. This book is a great collection that gives important issues a platform.

2011 Review: Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red Book Cover

Don’t believe everything you read.

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

By Mark Cronlund Anderson and Carmen L. Robertson

Published by University of Manitoba Press

 

Review by Christine McFarlane

 

“Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers” is a book that examines historical news coverage of formative events in Canada’s history, from Confederation through to the present day, and demonstrates through the authors’ research how overt racism against Natives has consistently existed in Canadian newspapers over this time.

Seeing Red is a groundbreaking study of how Canadian English-language newspapers have portrayed Aboriginal peoples from 1869 to the present day. It assesses a wide range of publications on topics that include the sale of Rupert’s Land, the signing of Treaty 3, the North-West Rebellion and Louis Riel, the death of Pauline Johnson, the outing of Grey Owl, the discussions surrounding Bill C-31, the “Bended Elbow” standoff at Kenora, Ont., and the Oka Crisis.

Cronlund and Robertson write “Canada is home to more than 600 Indigenous nations as well as roughly one-half million Aboriginals living off reserve. Prior to the centuries-long European invasion, these groups spoke dozens of different languages, exhibited wide variety in architecture, child rearing, clothing, diet, gender relations, material culture, religion, rituals—in short they varied in all the ways one might expect of an enormous region occupied by a wide range of cultural groups.”

The authors argue that despite these differences, “the country’s most ubiquitous agent of popular education, the newspaper, has tended to conflate all of these peoples into one heavily stereotyped monolith, patterned on a colonial ideology that flourishes to this day.”

If we were to believe the Canadian Press, Indians would have died off decades ago.

Take, for example, the Klondike press in the 1800s in which papers decided that “Natives were dying off, and, indeed, were intended by evolution to die off—even if the papers periodically reported that scientific study disproved this widely held late nineteenth century view.”

The authors write The Whitehorse Star reported that “Indians…have no idea how to cope…(they) are rapidly disappearing before the unequal struggle for existence side by side with white men.” The “average” Indian, the Star said, could only “mourn for the future of his race.”

The Yukon Sun offered the observation that “Indians are dying off” in spectacular fashion and went on to cite “horrors beyond description among diseased natives.”

“Seeing Red” also looked to today’s writers for their musings on Aboriginal topics, including the writings of Globe and Mail columnist Margaret Wente.

“Wente expresses deep faith in an ideology that you might simply refer to as Canadian liberal pluralism of the latter twentieth century.”

The authors quote Wente as writing “People are inherently tribal, and are inherently inclined to believe they are exploited…The job of civic society is to overcome these tribal resentments and replace them with a set of values and aspirations that are shared.” Wente goes on to state “my own fantasy is of a multiracial society, where we all become pretty much indistinguishable through integration, assimilation and intermarriage. (Imagine how much better looking we would be.)”

The authors state “Wente presents the case for assimilation as an article of faith, that assimilation is necessary because it is tautologically, inevitable.”

“Wente’s columns rely on every imaginable alleged Native shortcoming,” say the authors of Seeing Red, “from sexual depravity to financial corruption, thievery to alcoholism, poor parenting to childish behavior, receiving special rights to reverse racism against whites, inherent violence to being stuck in dying cultures without being smart enough to realize it.”

The conclusion of the authors is that “overt racism has existed in newspaper coverage of 100 or even 50 years ago,” and even in “contemporary newspapers, the same patterns of racism and subjugation continues to dominate how Aboriginal peoples continue to be seen within Canadian newspapers.”

The authors argue that as a result of press content and pre-existing reader bias, the “news constitutes a kind of national curriculum, which emerges organically, as if nothing were more natural. In short, as curriculum news images do not present new material so much as they simply reinforce the status quo.”

2011 Review: UnSettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling and Reconciliation in Canada

 

Usettling the Settler Within cover

Settler education the gap that needs bridging for true reconciliation

 

UnSettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling and Reconciliation in Canada

 

By Paulette Regan

 

Published By UBC Press 2010

 

Review by Christine McFarlane

 

 

 

On July 11, 2008, the Canadian government apologized to the victims of the Indian residential school system and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is tasked with attempting to mend the deep rifts between Aboriginal peoples and the settler society that engineered the system.

 

“UnSettling the Settler Within” by Paulette Regan opens with a foreword by Taiaiake Alfred who states “In a global era of apology and reconciliation, Canadians, like their counterparts in other settler nations, face a moral and ethical dilemma that stems from an unsavoury colonial past.” Alfred explains that Canadians grow up believing that the history of their country “is a story of the cooperative venture between people who came from elsewhere to make a better life and those who were already here.” He writes “Canadians do not like to hear that their country was founded through frauds, abuses and violence perpetrated against the original peoples of this land.”

 

“UnSettling the Settler Within” is a book that gives a counter argument to the peaceful creation myth and offers up the history and legacy of colonial violence that characterizes the Indian residential school system.

 

Author Regan rejects a self-congratulatory version of Canadian history and challenges her readers to re-think the myths that form the basis of settler identity.

 

She argues that in order to truly participate in the transformative possibilities of reconciliation, non-Aboriginal Canadians must undergo their own process of decolonization, and in order for the process of decolonization to happen Regan believes “they must relinquish the persistent myth of themselves as peacemakers and acknowledge the destructive legacy of a society that has stubbornly ignored and devalued Indigenous experience.”

 

“Today’s truth and reconciliation process must make space for an Indigenous historical counter-narrative in order to avoid perpetrating a colonial relationship between Aboriginal and settler peoples.”

 

Regan, a non-Indigenous individual and academic, writes this book from the perspective of her own work within the Canadian government, and as a result of her own learning journey as a Director of Research for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

 

She relays how the 2008 apology to Indian Residential School survivors marked a watershed moment of national truth telling about Canada’s past, and as a settler on these lands in Canada, the apology itself had her asking herself “what would it mean in concrete terms for the settler majority to shoulder the collective burden of the history and legacy of the residential school system.”

 

She argues “history teaches us that, despite the cry of “never again,” societies are quite capable of replicating in new forms the harmful societal attitudes and government policies of the past.”

 

She also questions how non-Indigenous people can make good on the promise to ensure that the attitudes that inspired the residential school system for more than a hundred years will never again prevail in Canada.

 

Interestingly, Regan brings up the issue of “Settler Responsibility: Knowing versus Not Knowing Indigenous People” and asks her readers to consider that if reconciliation was to be conceptualized as an intercultural encounter, it would need to entail “creating a space for critical dialogue-rooted in testimonial, ceremonial, and commemorative practices—between Indian residential school survivors and settlers who are either directly or indirectly implicated in the school system itself, as well as other assimilationist policies.”

 

She reminds readers that it remains challenging to design appropriate truth telling and reconciliation processes when there is a relatively high level of settler ignorance about Native issues in general, and it is this very issue of “claiming ignorance” that is at one of the roots of this rift between non-Indigenous and First Nations people.

 

This book is a must read for anyone who is interested in reconciliation and how it can work.

2012 Review: Discovering Totem Poles: A Traveler’s Guide

 A Traveler’s Guide book cover

Discovering Totem Poles: A Traveler’s Guide
Written By Aldona Jonaitis
Douglas & McIntyre Publishers Inc.

Book Review By Christine McFarlane

“Discovering Totem Poles: A Traveler’s Guide” is the first guidebook to focus on the complex and fascinating histories of the specific totem poles visitors encounter in Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver, Alert Bay, Prince Rupert, Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) Ketchikan, Sitka and Juneau.

Author Aldona Jonaitis says that “this book is intended to present the histories of a number of poles, focusing on how each one came about as the result, in part of the interactions between Native and non-Native people.”
It debunks common misconceptions about totem poles and explores the stories behind the making and displaying of 90 different poles. Each section of this guidebook is titled so that the reader is given an indication of what specific theme will be discussed.

Some of that discussion includes why poles are raised in Native communities, how they communicate information about the history and prestige of the families who own them, and how the actual raising of a pole is a great event.

She speaks briefly about the relationship of the totem poles to laws that limited Native freedoms, the ill effects of colonialism on Native traditions, and the dispossession of Native lands to the current resurgence of Native control over their heritage.

Jonaitis starts with the story of a Seattle totem pole at Pioneer Square and explores the intriguing history behind the raising of that pole, which includes theft, deceit and arson. The story behind this particular totem pole relays how “before 1899, the original of this Tlingit pole stood in the village of Tongass, located in the southernmost region of the Alaska panhandle. That year, a group of Seattle businessmen went north on a steamship trip to investigate possibilities for increasing trade and investment in Alaska,” and “stopping in Tongass and seeing few people, decided the village was abandoned and that they could take whatever seemed interesting.”

The theft of this pole and its transfer to Seattle by steamship and its intriguing journey back home is just one example of the stories collected in this book.

Another story speaks of a time in 1956, when a visionary British Columbian anthropologist by the name of Wilson Duff “traveled to the remote, uninhabited community of Sgaang Gwaii (Ninstints) on the farthest southern tip of Haida Gwaii, where an impressive stand of thirty totem poles still stood,” and how in the late 19th century, missionaries and government officials encouraged the Haida to stop carving poles and to cease all traditional ceremonies like potlatches.

It was by the mid-20th century that this encouragement was being recognized as a larger attempt at cultural destruction that bordered on cultural genocide, and “in part to correct such past injustice and to preserve what had been almost entirely destroyed, Duff and his colleagues wanted to salvage these magnificent carvings, such as the totem poles of Sgaang Gwaii.”

Unlike other guidebooks, this book demonstrates that “the totem pole is not a category of Native art invented hundreds of years ago that maintained its original significance, but is instead, a type of art that has over the decades been transformed by the colonial encounter.”

Discovering Totem Poles: A Guide for Travelers is published by D & M Publishers Inc and is available in paperback and e-book format. It is 112 pages.

2012 Review: Finding A Way to the Heart

 

Finding a Way to the Heart book cover

Influencing the world of scholarship

Book Review:
Finding A Way to the Heart: Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada

University of Manitoba Press 2012

Edited by Robin Jarvis Brownlie and Valerie J. Korinek

Reviewed By Christine McFarlane
Windspeaker Contributor

“Finding a Way to the Heart: Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada” is a scholarly book that examines race, gender, identity and colonization from the early 19th century to the late 20th century and illustrates renowned Canadian scholar Sylvia Van Kirk’s extensive influence on a generation of feminist scholarship and women’s history.

“Finding a Way to the Heart” initially began as a project in 2007 when a Canadian Historical Association Roundtable organized the panel “Many Tender Ties: A Forum in Honour of Sylvia Van Kirk” and brought together scholars, students and colleagues to provide a retrospective assessment of Sylvia Van Kirk’s academic accomplishments.

When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book “Many Tender Ties” in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in women’s, social, and Aboriginal history.

Using Van Kirk’s themes and methodologies, “Finding a Way to the Heart” is an anthology featuring various scholars and how they were impacted in one way or another through Van Kirk’s research.

Van Kirk’s research has included “women’s history, Native-Newcomer history, Canadian history, and has highlighted a number of issues that historians grapple with today still: the construction of racial, gender, and sexual norms in the West, the diversity of women’s history and the way in which white female settlers (those individuals so often romanticized by the settlement histories) were themselves agents of colonialism.”

Van Kirk’s argument that “the fur trade could not have proceeded at all without the active participation of women” has not only “turned the conventional view of history upside down,” but her feminist questions and insights have helped pry open the narrow parameters of historical inquiry to expand the areas of life considered worthy of investigation, and to admit new kinds of questions altogether.

Sylvia’s work has impacted many and this is abundantly clear throughout the essays written for “Finding a way to the Heart.”

Elizabeth Jameson contributed the essay “Ties Across the Border.” She asserts that Sylvia Van Kirk has influenced the writing of American history as few Canadian historians have.  She cites Van Kirk’s influence as “most evident in the histories of the U.S. fur trade, women in the U.S. West, and in histories of Native-Newcomer relations,” and how “the frameworks of these fields shifted in the 1980s through Van Kirk’s influence and that of other path-breaking scholars who placed American Indian women and other women of colour at the centres of history, and whose scholarship established the intertwined significance of race and gender as analytical categories.”

Another contributor, Angela Wanhalla, expresses in her essay “Beyond the Borders: The “Founding Families” of Southern New Zealand” that it is Sylvia Van Kirk’s analysis of “interracial marriage and mixed race peoples in the western Canadian fur trade” that has influenced a generation of scholars working on Native women’s history, the fur trade, Métis communities, and post colonial history in Canada and the United States. But Sylvia’s work has also reached beyond the borders of North America, shaping the scholarship and approaches of those working on the history of interracial marriage, gender, and colonialism in other former frontier societies like Australia and New Zealand.”

Wanhalla further argues “New Zealand has a distinctive history of hybridity where male newcomers entered into interracial relationships, contributing to the development of a hybrid population that was welcomed and celebrated by officials and Aboriginal peoples, and that this history of intermixing is not as well known as the social worlds and societies created out of the North America fur trade.”

It is through this lens that Wanhalla explores this social world, taking Van Kirk’s scholarship and methodology as a point of reference and extends it to the resource economies and frontier space of southern New Zealand while inviting connections with the histories of gender and colonialism in western Canada.

Sylvia’s research was groundbreaking in its attention to race, class and gender and though her research career began before gender history developed as a field, it was Sylvia’s attention to the difference gender made that helped reveal the tremendous potential this analytical framework offered for new insights into human experience and the workings of society.

Contributors throughout “Finding a way to the Heart” reflect on Van Kirk’s influence and how it impacted on their own research and opened their eyes to new methods of inquiry.

These contributors include Jennifer S.H. Brown, Franca Iacovetta, Valerie J. Korinek, Elizabeth Jameson, Adele Perry, Angela Wanhalla, Robert Alexander Innes, Patricia A. McCormack, Robin Jarvis Brownlie, Victoria Freeman, Kathryn McPherson and Katrina Srigley. Finding a Way to the Heart is published by the University of Manitoba Press and is 269 pages.

2012 Review: First Nations 101

First Nations 101 book cover

First Nations 101: Tons of stuff you need to know about First Nations people
Lynda Gray
Published By:
Adaawx Publishing
Pages:  275
Review by Christine McFarlane

“First Nations 101 written by author Lynda Gray is an informative and opinionated guide to First Nations issues. It is written in an accessible style and offers sections on Identity, Social Control, Community Issues, Fairness and Justice, Health and Wellness, Arts and The Road Forward: Forging A New Path.

Gray states in the opening of her book “It is not fair that educating the public about First Nations people, and concerns is left for First Nations people to do.”

First Nation 101 is different from other books written on First Nations issues because a First Nations author writes this book. Gray understands the issues and wants others to envision First Nations people in a more contemporary fashion and does not want the reader to see Native people in the usual stereotypical and stoic ways often depicted in books written by non-Native authors.

The reader is given an overview of the history of First Nations people. Within the overview, Gray touches upon the many ways in which non-Natives and Canada’s ensuing governments have imposed a form of social control over First Nations people through various actions, policies and laws, and the results of these actions.

As an example, Gray brings up community issues about First Nations people’s health, and explains how after being forced to abandon traditional lifestyles, which were more active prior to contact, our physical health has declined due to a more sedentary life and the introduction of new foods.

It is through the introduction of new foods, such as white flour, sugar, and cow’s milk, that our bodies have a hard time processing these foods. Due to the inability of being able to process these new foods, various health problems have arisen and are growing throughout First Nations communities. Health issues such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity are just a few that are named.

She also raises awareness of the many abuses that we all as First Nations have suffered, which have led to poor mental health, which includes low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation, the residential school era, and post-residential school era and the issue of our 500 Missing and Murdered Women.

Juxtaposing negative issues, Gray also speaks of the resilience of First Nations people, stating “it is important to remember that our people have such rich and vibrant histories, traditions and beliefs to draw from that can help us to overcome anything, “and speaks about First Nations artists and how they are our contemporary storytellers, and are at the forefront of First Nations culture, traditions and communities by sharing their work and inspiring others to find their own voices in creativity.

At the end of each section, Gray offers a list of other resources that the reader can draw upon for more information. Educating the non-Native population of Canada is needed in order to foster widespread and long lasting positive change.

First Nations 101 does an excellent job of starting the conversation especially since many First Nations issues have been caused by and/or perpetuated by external forces.

Please visit www.firstnations101.com for more info about the book and where to buy it.

2012 Review: Hope Faith & Empathy

Hope Faith & Empathy book cover

 

 

Book Review

Hope Faith & Empathy
Written By Monique Gray Smith
Published By Printorium Bookworks and Little Drum Consulting
139 Pages

“Hope, Faith & Empathy” is the story of Tilly, a young Indigenous woman growing up in Canada and the many ups and down she learns to navigate in the journey we all call life. The story is also about the people who have helped shape Tilly, her survival and her resilient spirit.

In the prologue to the story, author Monique Gray Smith writes “Hope, Faith & Empathy” will take you on a journey, a journey that is loosely based on my life’s story as an Indigenous woman, of individuals who showed up at a pivotal time in my life to guide and teach me and of characters who came to me as I wrote.”

The journey starts with an older Tilly receiving news at work from her doctor that she has a tumor in her lung and must go for surgery. The fears and anxiety that Tilly experiences with this news immediately pulls the reader into the main character’s life, and has them wanting to learn more about Tilly and how she got the strength she carries within her.

Using the surgery as a backdrop to tell Tilly’s story, the reader is then taken on a “healing journey—not just a physical journey, but also a spiritual journey,” as Tilly revisits some of the pivotal moments in her life and remembers the people who have helped shape her experiences and the woman she has become.

Tilly’s journey is one that a lot of Indigenous people can empathize with—turning to alcohol to mask an inner pain that can’t often be spoken of, experiencing loss and coming to terms with it, and awakening to a cultural identity that family may have inadvertently kept from you.

It is intriguing to read about the various people that have helped shape Tilly, especially when she speaks about her Grandma Tilly, her Auntie Pauline, Mrs. Murphy, her elementary school teacher who took the time out to tell Tilly that she mattered, and later on in life, her drug and alcohol therapy counsellor Bea. Each of these individuals are strong in their own unique ways and the lessons they teach Tilly are not only inspiring but life changing, and something that Tilly takes away with her in her healing.

The story within “Hope, Faith & Empathy” gives a unique perspective of the history of the first peoples in Canada, and includes the Sixties Scoop, Indigenous adoption, Indian Day Schools, Residential Schools, and tuberculosis hospitals.

It shares stories of homecomings rooted in courage and resiliency, and interwoven throughout the book are thought-provoking teachings, humour and wisdom.

Author Monique Gray Smith writes and gives a unique twist to the heavy issues that Indigenous people have unfortunately had to face.

To help Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers understand the book further, there is a glossary of the various terms used throughout the book such as “internalized racism, band, ancestors etc.” A diagram of the Umbrella of First Nations Resiliency that Gray Smith has used in talks is also included, as is a question section for your book club and educational groups.

2012 Review: Indian Horse

Indian Horse
By Richard Wagamese
Douglas & McIntyre
186 pages, $23.00

Award-winning author Richard Wagamese weaves an emotional and endearing story together in his latest novel Indian Horse that confronts the legacy of residential school in a young boy’s life and how the game of hockey serves as a way of coping.

Saul Indian Horse’s young life is marked by tragedy. His parents are residential school survivors, and his mother is so devastated by the experience that she turns so far inward that “she ceases to exist in the outside world.”

Saul’s parents lose their oldest daughter to the residential school. To prevent Saul and his younger brother Benjamin from being taken, they bring the boys into the bush to live off the land with an uncle and Saul’s grandmother.

The family manages to escape the authorities for a while, but Benjamin is eventually snatched by the government officials and placed in a school in Kenora. Benjamin escapes from the residential school a few years later, and returns to his family in the bush, only to die soon after from the tuberculosis he contracted while in the school.
Saul Indian Horse’s life is altered forever when his parents turn to alcohol and leave him with his grandma in the bush to take off for Northern Ontario’s mining and mill towns.

Life in the bush is soon abandoned when Saul’s grandmother decides to make a trip to the town of Minak where her brother Minoose lives. She says “We can stay with him through the winter if we have to,” and she tells Saul that if they stay in the bush it will be where they will die.

Saul and his grandmother make the trek to Minaki, but during the final leg of their journey, the grandmother grows tired. She takes Saul in her arms and says, “We’ll rest a minute.”

The reader’s heart goes out to Saul when, while huddled in the arms of his grandmother, he feels her grow cold and her spirit leave. It is while he is lying in the arms of his deceased grandmother that he is found and taken to the place he has worked so hard to avoid.

Indian Horse is a moving novel that takes readers inside residential school, and provides details of the abuses that went on there, but also talks about the hope that springs from the game of ice hockey, and how one priest takes Saul under his wing.

The reader sees how the game of hockey comes naturally to this young boy, and readers witness Saul’s brutal journey through the racist ranks of minor-league hockey into an alcohol-ravaged adulthood to a place of personal endurance and recovery.

Wagamese is once again at his finest. He takes his readers on an emotional journey; a journey that exposes the horrors of Canada’s residential schools, but also celebrates the triumphs of a young boy and his love for the game of hockey.

2012 Review: Jordin TooToo: The Highs and Lows in the Journey of the First Inuit to Play in the NHL

 

 

Jordin Tootoo book cover

 

Book Review

Jordin TooToo: The Highs and Lows in the Journey of the First Inuit to Play in the NHL
Lorimer Press
Written By Melanie Florence

“Fight your way through.” These were the words of Jordin Tootoo’s father when Jordin left Canada’s Far North to chase his dream of playing professional hockey.

Although Tootoo would become known as fearless on the ice, getting to the NHL took a lot of courage and determination. He had to overcome culture shock and homesickness, discrimination and racism, and the tragic suicide of his NHL bound older brother whom he worshipped.

Hailing from a small Inuit community called Rankin Inlet, Jordin Tootoo was four when he first laced up his first pair of skates. This book tells the story of Jordin Tootoo’s journey to the NHL, the struggles and the positive attitude he learns to adopt.

Hockey was a part of the Tootoo boys’ every day lives.  They learned to play hockey on any frozen surface they could find in Rankin Inlet and they grew up watching their own father play hockey and make a name for himself. Their father, knowing that his boys could only go so far with hockey in Rankin Inlet, had to make the tough decision of allowing his boys to leave home so that they could pursue their dreams of playing with the NHL.
After leaving Rankin Inlet, Jordin encountered racism for the first time.  He was used to Rankin Inlet where everyone looked alike and celebrated the same culture. Jordin recalled “I was the only Inuk in the area (Spruce Grove), and for the first time I experienced racism at school. I was living with a friend who was Aboriginal, and gangs of kids would come to the house yelling that we weren’t going to take over their school.”

To the local kids, there was no difference between Tootoo and his Aboriginal friend. They were both targets of abuse because of the way they looked. The attitude that he adopted to deal with the racism he encountered, was transferred over to his hockey playing. He believed that by taking negative situations and turning it into something to motivate him was what helped him the most in the early days of his career.

Though the primary focus of this book is hockey, the book covers a wide range of topics and issues that a young reader can take away with them, such as the rights of Inuit people on their land, the federal government’s description and recognition of Indigenous peoples, racism and the higher incidence of Aboriginal youth suicide.

To many, Jordin Tootoo is a Canadian hockey hero, because he not only plays for himself but he also plays for his brother and family, and for all the kids who will come after him, and through it all, he never forgets who he is or where he came from.

This book is a part of Lorimer Press’ RecordBooks. RecordBooks are action packed true stories of Canadian athletes who have changed the face of sport.

2012 Review: Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada: Mythic Discourse and the Postcolonial State

Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada

 

Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada: Mythic Discourse and the Postcolonial State
Jennifer Reid
Published By University of Manitoba Press
Pages: 314

Review by Christine McFarlane

Jennifer Reid’s book, “Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada” gets readers to look at a complex and comprehensive history of the Metis peoples, Louis Riel and the ensuing response to Riel’s life and work in the modern and political entity we call Canada.

Louis Riel as a revolutionary and as Canada’s most celebrated ‘traitor’ has been a highly contested subject of debate since Riel’s trial, the Red River uprising of 1869-70 and the Northwest Rebellion of 1885.

Reid notes that the uprisings at Red River and in the Northwest have been the subject of more books than any other in Canadian history; and more histories, biographies, novels and poetry have been written about Riel than any other Canadian figure.

Reid examines Riel’s religious background, the mythic significance that has been ascribed to him and how these elements tie into and influence Canada’s search for a national identity. Reid argues that a lot of why Louis Riel has become such an iconic Canadian historical figure has to do with the concepts of nationalism and the nation in the Canadian situation.

She gives a brief overview of the Metis uprisings and the area in which they transpired, speaks about the historically contested colonial space that became the Canadian West and delves into how all these issues tie into the Canadian mythic imagination.
The book provides a framework for readers to rethink the geopolitical significance of the modern Canadian state. We are also given a glimpse into how the historic role of Confederation played out in establishing the country’s collective self-image, and the narrative space through which Riel’s voice speaks in regard to these issues.

It is also intriguing to read how “in seeking a legitimate place for a Metis presence in Canada, Riel set forth a pattern and paradigm that became the template for all the major subsequent attempts to order the many and various regional, Euro-American ethnics, Metis, and Aborigines, as well as the various economic interests into some kind of ordered Canadian entity.”

“Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada: Mythic Discourse and the Postcolonial State” is an examination of myth and history. Reid examines in great detail “the mythicization of both Riel and the rebellions that have betrayed a desire on the part of many Canadians to locate a source of collective identity in a figure, and an event that are not only historical, but profoundly symbolic and enmeshed in consciously religious language.”

This book is a great read for those with an interest in history, but can be difficult to read for those who do not often engage in historical texts that examine identity alongside a nationalist discourse.

2012 Review: My Mother Is Now Earth

My Mother is Now Earth

Poetic tale of a life of hardship

My Mother Is Now Earth
Mark Anthony Rolo
Borealis Books 2012

Reviewed by Shari Narine

In My Mother Is Now Earth, Mark Anthony Rolo tells the heart-wrenching story of the last three years of his childhood, which coincides with the last three years of his mother’s life. In the way only a young child can view events and people, Rolo is stark in the presentation of his family: his Ojibwe mother, who even in her wedding picture is looking away; his drunk white father, who Rolo refers to as “the old man,” until his mother’s death; his older brothers, whom he both idolizes and criticizes; his only sister Philly, who pushes him away and then clings to him at the time of their mother’s passing; and his younger brothers, who he argues with and then tends when he is thrown in to the role of caregiver.

The autobiography begins with the majority of the Rolo family, including dog Whiskey, making the trip from Milwaukee to Big Falls, Minnesota in the dead of winter in the father’s Oldsmobile in 1971. The Rolo family has been uprooted by a fire and are on their way to a farm, where the house is uninhabitable, because of a fire. For the winter, they live in the garage.

What unfolds is continued hardship. Don Rolo, the family patriarch, is full of big plans – chickens and cows and a farm that can provide for the whole family. But Don’s drinking colours those plans, leaves his wife Corinne and his children on edge. In the end, though, Don does realize his goal. His family is much smaller than when he arrived, the oldest boys moved out, Philly and the youngest son in foster care. Don makes his final payment on the farm four years after Corinne’s death and immediately puts the farm up for sale.

To her death, Corinne Rolo remains a mystery to the young Mark. He is scared of her and the long-handled broom she uses to mete out punishment and he craves her affection. Corinne is always writing letters “to the sisters,” her three sisters who remained behind in Milwaukee. But she carefully edits her letters.  She exudes strength and dignity, but in return gives up the ability to present love openly.

In the summer of Rolo’s tenth year, he goes off to camp. When he returns home, he finds his mother sick. Shortly after that she dies on the operating table. It is her return to him in a dream in 2010 that prompts him to write his memoir.

My Mother Is Now Earth is full of nuances as Rolo stays true to his childhood self, understanding only what a pre-teen can, but in some of those moments his understanding is brilliant, like when he refers to the letters Corinne receives: “we know she likes to think about what’s in the letter, sometimes more than actually reading.” And in this same adolescent way, Rolo is harshly judgmental of his brothers and father, yet soft toward his mother, his fear of her as palpable as his need for her.

The young Rolo must not only navigate the world of his family but he must also navigate the wider world around him. He is an Indian, and although he knows very little of his culture (his mother shares almost nothing of her people’s ways), his Grade 5 teacher forces him to watch the news and orders him to make an oral presentation on the Indian standoff in South Dakota.
My Mother Is Now Earth is beautifully written. It paints the picture of a bleak, wintery landscape yet adds hope with such descriptions as “warm winds return as the winter weakens, drips away from the skies.” This is the same picture that can be painted of Rolo’s life. Although the young Rolo struggled in grade school, today he has a university degree and is a journalist, author and storyteller. He is also an enrolled member in his mother’s band, the Bad River Band of Ojibwe of Wisconsin.

2012 Review: Original People Original Television: The Launching of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network

 The Launching of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network

Original People Original Television: The Launching of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network
Jennifer David
Published By: Debwe Communications Inc.
Pages: 214

Review by Christine McFarlane

“Original People: Original Television,” is a behind-the-scenes look at Aboriginal Canadian broadcasting, beginning with Robert Flaherty’s documentary Nanook of the North in 1922 to the creation and launch of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) in 1999.

The story of how the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network was created is not only intriguing, but it describes the positive leap for Aboriginal peoples of Canada. Before the creation of Aboriginal/native broadcasting, Aboriginal people were often depicted as the Other, “seen as exotic creatures to be observed, and even admired by the audience and narrator,” writes author Jennifer David.

Within mainstream media, how Aboriginal people were portrayed was problematic because this included “decades of Western movies replete with bloodthirsty savages, shifty half-breeds, stoic warriors and exotic Indian Princesses in buckskin.” David curiously asks “Aboriginal people are the original inhabitants of the land we now call Canada. So how did Aboriginal Canadians become the outsiders?

The creation of APTN started with two movements in the 1960s and early 1970s, which were backed by initiatives like the National Film Board’s Challenge for Change program, and the Anik E-1 satellite experiments in northern Canada. Political and policy changes also brought about the creation of northern Aboriginal broadcasters and Television Northern Canada.

With the onset of television becoming Canada’s primary source of information and entertainment, these movements brought together Aboriginal filmmakers and producers in southern Canada and attracted the attention and support of various political bodies, such as the Assembly of First Nations (AFN). This changed the face of media in Canada.

“Original People, Original Television” relays the story of decades of hard work and the dreams of people who wanted their own television network. APTN allowed First Nations people to have their own voice and to tell their own stories, and Jennifer David does a great job of letting reading audiences know about the creation of Canada’s first Indigenous television network.

Original People, Original Television: The Launching of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network is a must read for those interested in media, the arts and culture, contemporary Aboriginal life, grass roots and national politics, and those seeking confirmation that a dream can come true.

2012 Review: Outcasts of River Falls

Outcasts of River Falls book cover

Outcasts of River Falls:
Published By Coteau Books for Kids
Written By Jacqueline Guest
242 Pages
Book Review By Christine McFarlane

Imagine growing up in a well-to-do home but because of a family death, having to move away from what you have always known to Alberta to live with an aunt you have never met. Now imagine learning that your familial roots are not what you were led to believe.

In ‘Outcasts of River Falls,’ the main character Kathryn experiences the loss of her father due to illness and has to leave her comfortable home and upper class school in Toronto to live with an aunt she has never met. Upon her arrival to Alberta, she is shocked to find out where she will be living, that the aunt she is going to be living with is not who she expected and discovers that her father had fled his home community to escape a problem he had no control over- ‘being Metis.’

An historical book, ‘Outcast of River Falls’ details a young girl’s journey of learning about her mixed identity and the troubles that come along with it.† Kathryn’s Aunt Belle does a great job of explaining the history of the Metis people of River Falls to her niece and does everything she can to make Kathryn comfortable with what she has.
It’s almost comical at first but also sad how Kathryn was used to living in a comfortable home and having money, and then upon her arrival in River Falls, she has to learn a whole new way of life. She goes from having people do things for her, to having to learn how to do things for herself, like fetching water to wash the dishes, using an outhouse, building her own bedroom in the shack she now has to live in, and using a horse and buggy for transportation.

Her indignation at how the people of River Falls are treated is typical of how present day relations of First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities can be seen by those who don’t understand a rich and complex history. There is also an element of mystery in ‘Outcast of River Falls’ because there is a mysterious Highwayman that appears, that the local officials want to get rid of. The mystery is discovering who this Highwayman is.

“Outcast of River Falls” is a sequel to Metis writer Jacqueline Guest’s book “Belle of Batoche.” Like other books written by Guest, this book is unique in the sense that the main characters are well drawn out and face issues that are common to every child, such as bullying, blended families, physical challenges, and personal journeys into discovering who they are and what they can be. This book is great for young readers, and is a great page-turner.

2012 Review: Racialized Policing: Aboriginal People’s Encounters with the Police

 Aboriginal People’s Encounters with the Police By Elizabeth

Widen the gaze beyond profiling and racism

Racialized Policing: Aboriginal People’s Encounters with the Police
By Elizabeth Comack
Fernwood Publishing – Halifax and Winnipeg, 2012

Review by Shari Narine

The most disturbing aspect of Elizabeth Comack’s Racialized Policing: Aboriginal People’s Encounters with the Police is not the first-hand experiences it relates in the pages, but the stories it mirrors from today’s headlines.

Take for example a recent case in Ontario which has pushed a coalition of First Nations led by Nishnawbe Aski Nation to file a complaint with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal. The coalition claims that an internal email, written by a Thunder Bay Police Services detective and mistakenly released publicly, is an indication of the lack of respect Aboriginal people face. That email was entitled “Fresh Breath Killer Captured” and referred to a murder investigation that involved a First Nations victim and the arrest of a Thunder Bay man for second-degree murder. NAN pushed for an investigation by the police service. While the police service agreed to investigate, both the chief and the mayor of Thunder Bay (who happens to serve on the police commission and is a former police officer) claimed there was no racism involved. Not expecting a fair inquiry by the police, the First Nations coalition took its concerns to the Human Rights Tribunal.

This sort of incident is exactly what Comack talks about, making the distinction between racism and racialized policing. Says Comack, “While racial profiling and individual racism are significant issues and must receive attention, we need to broaden our gaze to include the ways in which race and racism play out in institutional practices and systemic processes.” This wider picture is what Comack refers to as “racialized policing.”

There is no lack of incidents for her to choose from when making her point. And these cases are not focused in a single province or one region of the country, but right across Canada.

Ontario Provincial Police shot and killed unarmed protester Dudley George during a 1995 standoff with Aboriginal people in Ipperwash Provincial Park. In Winnipeg, there were the shooting deaths by the police of JJ Harper (1998) and 18-year-old Matthew Dumas (2005). In Saskatoon spanning from 1990 to 2000 there is the infamous Starlight tours, in which Aboriginal people were taken from the downtown area and dropped on the outskirts of the city. Such treatment resulted in the deaths of Neil Stonechild (1990) Rodney Nastius (2000) and Lawrence Wegner (2000).

In Comack’s examination of the system, she also looks at why Aboriginal people sometimes react the way they do to police or figures of authority. Many don’t have the expectation of fair treatment, whether that’s based on present occurrences or having grown up with family who were part of the residential school system. After all, it was police who accompanied the priest or school master to the homes to take away the children. The roots of distrust are deep and there is no clear indication that there are reasons for that distrust to change.

Comack also examines the inquiries called as a result of some of the questionable deaths of Aboriginal people. These are as disturbing – if not more so – than the actual incidents. They are more disturbing because there is always the belief that an inquiry starts from a place of wanting answers and will end in a place of getting those answers. However, in a system where the police department investigates the actions of its own police officers, often times the officer is not found culpable or receives a light reprimand. It is no wonder NAN and the other First Nations in the Thunder Bay situation are pushing for an outside inquiry. It is the wider commissions that seem to get results.

Comack is clear in presenting her work that it is not about police bashing but about examining the system.

Comack raises the issues, examines them carefully, and leaves disquieting truths.

And those truths are upheld in today’s news.

2012 review: Hook Up

Hook Up book cover

 

Hook Up
Lorimer Press
Written By Kim Firmston
151 pages
Book Review
By Christine McFarlane

“Hook Up” is a young teenage fiction book that takes readers on a journey with Cody Manywounds, a First Nations teenager from the Tsuu T’ina Nation who is trying to find his place in the world.
In the past, Manywounds had gotten into trouble with two of his best friends Silas and Jarrod, and as a result of that trouble, the police and social services became involved.

After his mother calls on the Elders in his family for advice, and has a talk with his Uncle Tom, Cody takes up the sport jiu-jitsu. Cody figures that taking up jiu-jitsu is a way to honour his people because his nation is “a nation of warriors after all, and mixed martial arts is cool.”

As a Native living in Calgary and not on the reserve, Cody faces a lot of racism at school. He says, “yeah there is an anti bullying policy but that seems to only work on paper.” He is called names like “chief, spear-chucker, or injun,” and if he skips a day of school, the teachers think it’s because he’s been drinking and not because he had a cold.

After taking up jiu-jitsu, Cody’s life turns around for the better. He meets his jiu-jitsu sparring partner’s twin sister Miranda, and thinks she is hot. His grades are good and the escape to university (and more girls) is just around the corner.

Manywounds gets caught up in his feelings for Miranda and loses touch with his friends and what they are going through. It is after one night of fooling around with Miranda that he finds out she is pregnant.

When he gets a text message from Miranda saying, “I’m pregnant, call me” Cody finds that his plans to go to university could be torn to pieces.

Miranda, an athlete herself, is supposed to be going to university in the fall on a soccer scholarship, but with her pregnancy, she finds that she has to make the toughest decision possible—to get an abortion.

Cody then finds himself dealing with conflicting emotions, and discovers how little a say he is given in the matter, and this causes both Miranda and Cody heartbreak.

In one sweep, Cody Manywounds has to grow up and learn that there is more to the world than just himself and his feelings to consider.

Written by Kim Firmston, “Hook Up” is powerful, well written, and suspenseful with characters that are appealing, convincing and complex.

2013 Review: Aboriginal Rights are Not Human Rights

 

Aboriginal Rights are Not Human Rights

Aboriginal Rights are Not Human Rights
In Defence of Indigenous Struggles
Author: Peter Kulchyski

Review by David P. Ball

When hundreds of police raided a Mi’kmaq anti-fracking blockade near Elsipogtog First Nation only days after the United Nations Indigenous rights envoy left the country, many immediately appealed to James Anaya to speak out against the RCMP action.

Over the years, sustained–and successful–pressure was aimed at a recalcitrant Prime Minister Stephen Harper to sign onto the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), which the Conservative leader finally did in 2007.

But the widespread push to hold Canada accountable to international rights norms when it comes to Aboriginal communities caused one University of Manitoba Native Studies professor to examine the celebrated document more closely.

The result: Peter Kulchyski’s provocatively titled new book, Aboriginal Rights are not Human Rights (Arbeiter Ring, 2013). He admits his conclusions about UNDRIP, outlined in one of the 173-page book’s chapters, might raise some eyebrows in Indian Country.

“I took a more serious look at the UN Declaration, and realized that really it confuses Aboriginal rights and human rights,” he told Windspeaker. “Aboriginal rights are distinct.

“Much of the struggle of Aboriginal people is oriented around trying to gain recognition and protection for Aboriginal and treaty rights ... I found (UNDRIP) was deeply flawed. That’s not popular for me to be saying that!”

As he defines them, Aboriginal rights are communally held rights rooted in distinct cultures and practices enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The constitutional document also ensures that the human rights enjoyed by all individual Canadians cannot trump the inherent collective rights and culture of Aboriginal communities.

On the other hand, he argues that human rights are European concepts applying only to individuals, not to communities or cultures.

“There are good things about the UN Declaration,” he argued, “but structurally there’s a problem in that it doesn’t see the fact that human rights can be used to violate Aboriginal rights.”

Former Neskonlith First Nation chief Arthur Manuel, chairman of the Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade, told Windspeaker that Kulchyski argues valid criticisms of UNDRIP, but that international human rights mechanisms are still important because “you need to use all the tools you can access.”

While Kulchyski agreed that both forms of rights can be useful as tactics, Manuel agreed that inherent Aboriginal rights under Charter Section 35 continue to form a backbone of many struggles.

“There have been issues about the UN Declaration,” Manuel acknowledged. “It’s not really a law, but a declaration between nations.

“But UNDRIP does another thing: it applies self-determination to Indigenous Peoples. Canada tried to water it down a bit, but they are accountable, without question, to it ... Section 35.1 hasn’t been able to force the government to recognize and accommodate Aboriginal title, but has given us enough protection that they have to get our approval to modify or extinguish it.
That’s where Canadians have to realize that Canada is a real human rights violator and culprit under the present UN policy – you can’t extinguish title.”

Lest anybody mistake his slim, accessible book’s title for some Tom Flanagan-esque rightwing tract denying Aboriginal people have rights, Kulchyski’s offering is subtitled, In Defence of Indigenous Struggles – struggles to which the scholar, as a longtime non-Aboriginal activist, is no stranger.

His decades of advocacy and accompaniment with Aboriginal communities, including Grassy Narrows First Nation in Ontario, northern Manitoba’s Cree communities, and Inuit on Baffin Island, have shaped his driving call to a “bush philosophy” rooted in rural hunting culture.

His previous book, The Red Indians, explored a history of Indigenous resistance to capitalism in Canada, and as a non-Aboriginal, his close involvement with the group Defenders of the Land has highlighted a strategy of linking together remote rural Indigenous communities in the disparate reaches of the country.

Several chapters explore the controversial politics of his own Manitoba backyard – Indigenous struggles against hydroelectric power projects in the province’s north, an injustice Kulchyski hopes to draw more attention to despite rare media attention nationally.

“Once again there’s a wave of hydro projects in northern Manitoba,” he said, “but they’re not on the national radar because the energy issues we’re more interested in today nationally are tar sands.

“What’s happening here is tragic in many, many ways. They’ve re-engineered the rivers ... They have to flood significant acreages of land, which releases mercury into the water that gets into the food chain through the fish. There are absolutely disastrous local and ecological impacts. Yet they keep advertising (hydro) as ‘clean.’ They should recognize the damage they’re doing.”

Aboriginal Rights are not Human Rights deals with far more than the United Nations or specific protests. Kulchyski brings much-needed and long-overdue attention to anti-hydroelectric movements in his province, which he described as being unfortunately eclipsed by other priority environmental issues, but deserve criticism.

“I learn something from every community I travel to,” he said. “They’re all unique and their particular problems are always unique.

“I find it’s the hunting families in any community I go to where I am going into the bush, and whenever I get a chance I go into the bush with them and see how people are living. It gives me a particular perspective on Indigenous peoples’ struggles.”

As he writes in the book, the “bush ... allows us to think a lived relation to and in this landscape… You can find the bush, even in the Eaton Centre, but first you have to get the mall out of your head.”

As Kulchyski sees it, it’s in the “bush” where we find “the ghosts of this country,” from the violence of Canada’s history; he adds that “no amount of pavement” can pave over that dark history. But the bush is both a philosophical symbol and lived reality for many rural communities, and one Kulchyski hopes might inform a forward-looking strategy for Indigenous peoples seeking liberation from ongoing colonialism.

“We’re in a moment when things are still reactive, as happened out on the east coast,” he said, alluding to events at Elsipogtog First Nation. “A community is responding to a threat, that struggle escalates, and there’s a fairly large solidarity movement.
“We will turn a page when communities decide themselves not to wait for something to happen, but to push the issues and be proactive – to plan coordinated actions that push the government to change some of its worst policies.”

2013 Review: Blasphemy

 Blasphemy

Blasphemy
Author: Sherman Alexie
Published By: Grove Press
Pages: 465

Review by Christine Smith

Author Sherman Alexie never fails to make you laugh when you read one of his books. Blasphemy is an anthology of 15 of his classics, such as “War Dances,” “The Toughest Indian in the World,” and “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven”, and a compilation of 16 new stories.

Thought-provoking and intriguing, Alexie’s characters in each story grapple with such issues as racism, resilience, damaging stereotypes, poverty, alcoholism, broken marriages and single parenthood, domestic violence, the loss of languages and customs, diabetes, dreams of days gone by and homophobia.

It is about resilience, for example, when you read “The Toughest Indian In the World,” and how a fighter relays a story about a battle between himself and a kid to a features newspaper writer while hitchhiking. The kid’s a boy called a Flathead; a kid who would not go down no matter how many times he was hit.

There’s the story of “Whatever Happened to Frank Snake Church,” a 40-year-old Native man who is living on memories from the past as he tries to re-invent himself. With both his parents gone—orphaned at 39-years-old—Snake Church quits his well-paying job as a forest ranger, hires a personal trainer to help him get himself back into shape to play basketball, a game that he was good at in his younger years.

You feel Snake Church’s pain and empathize with the urgency of his grief as he undergoes a physical and emotional transformation. You feel it when he removes art from the walls of his apartment and sells it through want ads and garage sales, disconnects his phone and permanently stops his mail, or when he piles up old blankets and quilts that have been in his family for more than 80 years and gives them away to his neighbors without any thought, or scoops up various knickknacks and sentimental souvenirs and sets them out on the corner for strangers to carry away. You identify with these actions of a grief-stricken man, because it is like he is purging himself of the memories that remind him of his parents and his past, so that he can start anew.

Another story that really plays on the emotions is “Indian Country.” Indian Country is about a Native woman who has fallen in love with a white woman, and how the parents are unable to accept that their daughter is gay. They come from the reserve and try to talk their daughter into leaving her girlfriend, only to get embroiled in a fight with a passing stranger Low Man, and their daughter and her girlfriend. The fight has their daughter walking away, and as the daughter does, the father rushes her and says, “You’re coming with us.” When the daughter says no, the father walks back to his wife in defeat, where they both cry. Low Man calls after the father.

“What are you going to do? “What are you going to do when she’s gone?”

Sherman Alexie is a master at the craft of writing short stories. His stories bring about a blend of emotions. They can have you laughing, crying, angry or sad. This book is highly recommended.

2013 Review: Brighter Days Ahead

Brighter Days Ahead

Brighter Days Ahead
Author: Robert Henry

By Shari Narine
Windspeaker Contributor
SASKATOON

Brighter Days Ahead is a photo voice book that provides a glimpse into University of Saskatchewan Ph.D. candidate Robert Henry’s dissertation on masculinity, identity, Aboriginal men and gangs.

Nine of the 16 men to be featured in Henry’s dissertation are included in the book, which was launched last month.

“Their stories didn’t surprise me. What surprised me was how well they took hold of the project,” said Henry. “It’s a way to give something back because they’ve come to the understanding that they’ve taken so much from the community. Now they need to learn to give back to the community. And that’s the hardest part, being humble, understanding what has gone on and trying to fix it so that other youth… much like themselves don’t get caught up in the same type of lifestyle.”

Henry is familiar with the life that leads men to join gangs. He has been a board member and events helper for a number of years with STR8 UP, a Saskatoon program operated by the John Howard Society, which focuses on helping men and women leave gangs.

Gang members are marginalized individuals, who the system has failed, said Henry. They normally join in their mid-teens (although some join in their 20s) as the gang provides the support system members desperately need and can’t get elsewhere.

Henry spent time building a relationship with the men who participated in the book. Then he gave them digital cameras and asked them to take photos that spoke to who they were before they joined the gang and their experiences with the gang.

“It was really tough for some of them to go back and think about that life that they’re trying to leave behind, that they’re trying to move away from. So it was really tough for them to go back and try to show people what it’s all about,” said Henry.

Photos ranged from places they had lived or been to “spaces of violence” to inclusion of their own children. Henry ended up with almost 600 photos, taken between August 2012 and March 2013. While some participants took 10 to 12 photos and others took hundreds, the majority shot around 40 each.

“Some (photos) reflect metaphors of their lives,” said Henry. “I was looking at the idea of how the gang has come to shape their concepts of masculinity and identity.”

Of the nine that participated in the book, only three are over the age of 30. Four have left the gangs and the other five have made the “conscious decision to get out.” Henry points out that joining a gang is a 12 to 16-year process, while leaving a gang is also a long-term process.

Those that have been successful in distancing themselves from the lifestyle have found something else to hold on to. For two, it is Christianity; one is through renewing his culture; and a fourth has thrown himself into working hard and making money.

“The way in which people are pulled out of the gang is very reflective of their lifestyle before they even got in. How did they connect before-hand?” said Henry.

Henry hopes to have his dissertation completed by April 2014.
The ownership the nine men took of the voice photo book project will be part of his dissertation, which will answer the broader question of “how has the gang-set space come to be an area or space for some Indigenous men to practise their identity and masculinity.”

Henry, who is Métis from Prince Albert, has had his Ph.D. work funded through the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Council, which gives out awards to students whose work relates to Indigenous health research.

IPHRC helped launch Brighter Days Ahead.

“The book is knowledge translation from his research that we wanted to make sure got out there because I think it’s really important what he’s doing,” said Cassandra Ozog, IPHRC research officer in communications and knowledge transfer.

2013 Review: Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity and the National Imaginary

Creative Subversions

Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity and the National Imaginary
Written By Margot Francis
Published By UBC Press
224 Pages

When you think of Canada and the nationalist image it presents to the world, are there certain images that come to mind? And with these images have you ever thought of where they came from, and the secrecy that lies behind them? Have you ever been challenged to rethink these images you have come to know as a part of Canada’s image?

In Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity and the National Imaginary, author Margot Francis explores the national imaginary of Canada using the unique concept of haunting. It is interesting to read that the images we have come to know as a part of Canada have a history and a secrecy behind them that is not considered.

In this text Francis states  “although the intellectual work of this project led, on its own account, to a consideration of haunting, the material conditions of writing offered a parallel process, one that also invited me to consider how the experience of ghosts is implicated in the everyday geography of Canadianness.”

She argues that the images we have come to see as a part of Canada’s nationhood—the beaver, the railway, the wilderness of Banff National Park and Indianness—are all veiled in a secrecy and are haunted by ideas of race, masculinity, and sexuality, and it is these images that stem from Canada’s early formative years that we as Canadians have learned to not question.

Francis says much of her writing on spectres was done after working at Algoma University College (AUC) in Sault Ste. Marie, which is “an institution built, literally, from the bricks and mortar of the now (in) famous Shingwauk Residential School,” in quoting cultural theorist Kathleen Brogan.

Francis argues “one of the most frightening aspects of being haunted is its involuntary nature: we cannot choose our ghosts.” Nor do we choose the open secrets of Canadianness. She goes onto explain how ‘secrets’ can provide a way of thinking through what Robert Jay Lifton calls “the potentially transformative influence of death on theory.”

Francis argues that histories of death and dispossession through Canadian nation building is far from exemplary, and draws upon other scholars work, such as Bonita Lawrence and Victoria Freeman, who have similarly argued that if you were “to do an investigation into the history of Indigenous/Anglo-Canadian relations in southern Ontario,” there would be very similar themes.

Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity, and the National Imaginary is a complex book, and can be difficult to read. It not only explores aspects of haunting and secrecy in the making of the Canadian nation, it also explores the concepts of “how whiteness and Indigeneity are articulated through icons that we have come to associate with Canadian identity.”

It is a text that is heavy on creative theoretical contributions of Aboriginal and Anglo-Canadian artists who wrestle with the ongoing meanings of Canada in its colonial past and present. Francis does a thorough job in investigating Canadian nationhood and challenges her readers to rethink how everyday objects can be reimagined to challenge how we (the Canadian public) perceive the history we are taught, the memory surrounding it and the national identity we have come to know as Canada.

2013 Review: Disinherited Generations: Our Struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and their Descendants

 Our Struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nation

Valuable lessons to be learned from women’s equality rights activists

 

Disinherited Generations: Our Struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and their Descendants
Authors: Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steinhauer as told to Linda Goyette
Published by The University of Alberta Press
Review by Shari Narine

It is only fitting to hear that strong women in Alberta not only furthered the cause of non-Aboriginal women to be seen as “persons,” but that strong First Nations women in Alberta fought for the treaty rights of their own generation and descendants.
Born into the Saddle Lake Cree Nation, cousins Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steinhauer are the founders and long-time activists with Indian Rights for Indian Women. Both women lost their treaty status when they married non-status Indians.

Their struggles, both personal and on behalf of other First Nations women is told mainly through anecdotes, both poignant and humourous, to award-winning journalist Linda Goyette. Steinhauer passed away in 2012 before the book was officially launched, while Carlson, 85, now resides in Edmonton.

In the book’s foreword, activist Maria Campbell points out that, because of Carlson’s and Steinhauer’s relentless work, “170,000 First Nations people benefited from your struggle to restore an inheritance that is about identity, belonging and place.”

Goyette does an admirable job of what had to be a difficult task: sorting through four separate conversations that took place between 2000 and 2011 and distilling the facts of the struggle while keeping the personalities of the women intact.

Writes Goyette, “I am aware that a transcriber shapes the story and becomes part of it as an invisible third author.”

However, Goyette embraces the storytelling aspect of Aboriginal culture and at times that makes the narration somewhat disjointed.

Goyette traces the two women’s fight for justice, which began when they married non-status Indians and lost their treaty rights.
Steinhauer told her husband Gilbert that while she would give up her treaty rights to get married, she would also get them back. In her words: “And I pounded the table. I was really angry, and he knew it. And I said, ‘I’ll get my rights and you’ll get your rights and our children will get their rights.’ He put on his jacket, and I said after him, ‘and all our descendants!’”

Carlson points out that the Indian Act section on women and marriage changed six times over the years and on the sixth time, women and their children lost all rights. She also talks about the promise she made to her dying mother that she would fight for the disenfranchised children.

But it wasn’t only the federal government that Carlson and Steinhauer had to battle; they also had to fight their own people. They fought the leadership of their own First Nation, stood firm against family members, and took on heavily male-dominated First Nations organizations, such as the National Indian Brotherhood (which later became the Assembly of First Nations) and treaty organizations in most provinces.

The creation of Indian Rights for Indian Women occurred in 1971, in the midst of the creation of other Aboriginal organizations, court battles for land and treaty claims, and marches against racism.

“In this lively atmosphere,” writes Goyette, “disinherited First Nations women across the country demanded an end to the sexual discrimination in the membership rules of the Indian Act.”
Indian Rights for Indian Women fought the battle for 18 years, much longer than the leaders or any of the women had anticipated.

On June 28, 1985, Bill C-31 was passed, bringing the Indian Act into line with the equality guarantees in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Disinherited Generations provides valuable insight into the hearts and the minds of the women who led the Indian Rights for Indian Women.

2013 Review: For King and Kanata

For King and Kanata

Author looks at warfare and First Nations involvement [book review]

 

For King and Kanata:
Canadian Indians and the First World War
By Timothy C. Winegard
Published By University of Manitoba Press
Pages: 224
Reviewed by Christine Smith

In “King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War” author Timothy C. Winegard takes a comprehensive look at the history of First Nations people and their experience on the battlefield and home front during this time of war.

Winegard writes about the Indian and Settler-State experience and states early on that “warfare played an important role in the political, social, cultural and genetic frameworks of Indian nations,” and “in pre-contact warfare, raiding parties which were led by proven war chiefs and usually numbered less than 200 warriors, were sent to settle scores, to acquire provisions, or to avenge the deaths of or replace deceased clan members (known as mourning wars).”

But despite earlier warfare experience and the First Nations’ pledge to the Crown that their men would fight to honour their long-standing military alliances with the Europeans during times of war, the Canadian government was of the opinion that “status Indians were unsuited to modern, civilized warfare.”

Under the British North America Act and the Indian Act, Canadian Indians did not have the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and the government of Canada did not expect or need Canadian Indians to take up arms in what they saw as a foreign war.
Another apprehension the Canadian government had was that including Indians in “an expeditionary force could violate treaties, as evidenced by the position of the government during the Boer War.”

Canada’s stance on First Nations soldiers’ involvement in the First World War changed when Britain intervened in 1915. Britain demanded Canada to actively recruit First Nations soldiers to meet the increasing need for more manpower on the battlefields. The number of First Nations soldiers that participated has never fully been disclosed. This is due to the fact that “there were undoubtedly cases of Indian enlistment which were not reported to the department,” and most “status Indians were not recorded as such upon enlistment, as attestation papers did not record race.”

After Britain intervened and demanded that First Nations become a part of the First World War, complications arose between the national and international forces that influenced the more than 4,000 status Indians who served in the First World War. Winegard reports that subsequent administrative policies affected First Nations soldiers at home, the battlefield and as returning veterans.

For history buffs, this book is a must read for the account of just how much Canadian First Nations participated in the First World War, why they participated and what happened to them after the war.

2013 Review: Healing Histories: Stories from Canada’s Indian Hospitals

Healing Histories book cover

Book provides mixture of anecdotes, facts about TB hospitals

 

Laurie Meijer Drees

University of Alberta Press, 2013

Edmonton, Alberta

ISBN 978-0-88864-650-7

244 pages

Reviewed by Heather Andrews Miller

In the early twentieth century, infectious diseases ravaged the populations of Canada, especially in the north. The occurrence of tuberculosis and measles reached epidemic proportions and whole families and often whole communities were devastated.

Laurie Meijer Drees describes the government’s practice of the day to heal those affected Indigenous people by sending them to hospitals in southern Canada, under threat of action by the law if they refused to go. Thus began another institutional experience for Aboriginal people in our country which, when paired with the residential school system, made a vast impact on the living culture of First Nations, Dene, Métis and Inuit people.

Drees, who is co-chair of the First Nations Studies Department at Vancouver Island University, states in her book that 18 hospitals offered treatment including Edmonton, Nanaimo, and Fort Qu’Appelle. The Charles Camsell Indian Hospital in Edmonton was considered one of the best. With 350 beds that later grew to number 500, the Camsell was a former Jesuit College refurbished by the American military during World War Two. However, unlike the hated Indian Residential School, the occupants at the Camsell were encouraged to pursue the making of traditional handicrafts, which were offered for sale in the hospital’s gift shop. Those who were not bedridden were invited to play outside the facility and many overcame their homesickness by developing close friendships with other patients. For the older patients, movies, dances, visiting entertainers and music were provided to help pass the long hours of prescribed bed rest. TB, as tuberculosis is commonly known, can occur in people of any age, and there was a mixed population of children and adults who tried to help each other back to a healthy life and a return to their home communities.

As Drees explains, infection rates for Aboriginal people were 10 times the national average in 1944. The disease was unknown to the population until the European settlers introduced it in the 1700s. With the building of the railway and the establishment of the reserve system, First Nations people were confined in crowded living conditions and were often under-nourished, further facilitating the spread of the disease. Many more developed the condition in residential schools where death rates were high.

In addition to government statistics and commentaries by non-Aboriginal officials and health practitioners, also included are compelling revelations of former patients who benefitted from their stays at the hospitals. Some went on to careers as registered nurses and health care workers, inspired by their desire to improve their communities back home. Indeed, Drees credits these early professionals with spawning the seeds for self-determination in Aboriginal health care. Others stayed to work in the laundry, housekeeping or kitchen areas, making the most of their recuperation by participating in the hospital’s educational and occupational programming.

The patients were usually from small isolated communities and they saw for the first time the bright lights of the city and experienced modern household conveniences. It was often a time of realization about a new world of which they knew nothing.

The intercultural book will be of value by those interested in the history of medicine and nursing, and of Canadian Aboriginal people. Oral histories have been captured to become part of the experience of a diverse group of individuals who were affected by tuberculosis in the middle of the 20th century in Canada and who shared an awakening during their healing. It moves beyond the colonialism, victimization, and cultural destruction of other experiences and leaves the reader well-informed about a period of Canada’s history which changed lives forever.

 

 

2013 Review: Stories in a New Skin: Approaches to Inuit Literature

Stories in  a new skin cover

 

 

Stories in a New Skin: Approaches to Inuit Literature
Author: Keavy Martin
(Published by The University of Manitoba Press)
Review by Shari Narine

Keavy Martin presents a circular argument in her academically-heavy Stories in a New Skin: Approaches to Inuit Literature.

Martin holds that Inuit literature – which she takes as a broad category – demands to be acknowledged by the western world in the same manner that other Indigenous work is. However, she says that for Inuit literature to be understood by broader society it needs to be explained to such a point that it loses its true Indigeneity.

Inuit storytelling not only entertains but imparts a lesson. What the listener takes from the story is dependent on the place the listener comes from. So in true Inuit fashion, when a story is told, the lesson isn’t drawn. However, Martin says, that isn’t the case in the southern world where lessons need to be clearly stated in order for the non-Inuit to understand. In this way, in the need to have to explain not only history and the context of the tale (or song), but also the meaning, true Inuit literature is not what is being shared with the southern reader.

In Stories in a New Skin, Martin examines the literature that comes from Nunavut, looking at its storytelling tradition, its history and its politics – both politics that are true to the Inuit and politics that are forced upon the Inuit by a western political structure. Indeed the very title of her work emphasizes this belief.

She points out that “skins and skin clothing are obviously of enormous importance in Inuit tradition,” yet an imposed political system forces Inuit literature into a broader audience, which if that audience is to understand what it is reading, forces the literature to grow a new skin or shed the old one.

“It represents both the possibility and the discomfort of adaptation,” says Martin.

While the south is quick to think of Nunavut – and some would argue all three Canadian territories along with Alaska and Siberia – as having a “common land, language and culture,” Martin points out that it is this vastness that means this isn’t the case as is clearly seen in a broad array of storytelling in its many forms and detail.

She states the Inuit Circumpolar Council is partially to blame for promoting a single-minded approach to literature (and therefore downplaying the diversity) in the same way it has provided a single, unified voice for Inuit politics.

“The most important national trait is the tradition of telling stories that work to define Inuitness by raising the spectre of Otherness,” says Martin.

While there is a lack of Inuit literature available to the broader audience, there is, perhaps surprisingly, a fairly large collection of Inuit work – songs, poetry and tales - available to scholars dating back almost a century.

While Stories in a New Skin is highly academic reading, reference heavy and therefore sometimes difficult to ascertain where Martin herself stands on the issue of sharing Inuit literature with a broader audience, she does offer food for thought.

She quotes the IQ Task Force report, which asks the question, “Should the Nunavut government try to incorporate the Inuit Culture into itself, or … should the Nunavut government incorporate itself into the Inuit Culture?”

This could be the question Martin intends to leave the reader with: “Should Inuit literature fit into the broader southern context or should the broader southern context work within the Inuit literature?”

2013 Review: The Inconvenient Indian

The Inconvenient Indian

The Inconvenient Indian:
A Curious Account of Native People in North America
By Thomas King

Review by Christine McFarlane

Have you ever really looked at history and the stories behind them? Do you question if these stories are fact or myth or accept them as the absolute truth? You would like to think that what you are reading in your history books is truth, but…

In “The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America,” author Thomas King looks at the stories behind such events as the 1861 Almo massacre by the Shoshone-Bannock, the meeting of Pocahontas and Captain John Smith, the Rebellion of 1885 with Louis Riel, the 1876 Battle of the Little Bighorn with George Armstrong Custer, and many other stories and he points out the inconsistencies in each.

In the stories, we are made to believe facts that are based on tales someone has made up and told someone else. The massacre in the town of Almo did not happen, because at that time in history attacks with such a large number of casualties did not go without mention. Newspapers at that time made no mention of this so-called massacre, nor is there record of this in the National Archives or in the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs that are kept for various states and territories.

King argues that it was not until 66 years after this supposed event that a plaque was erected in the town of Almo as part of “Exploration Day,” which is an event that is designed to celebrate Idaho history and promote tourism in the area.

Similarly, there is the story of how Captain John Smith was saved by Pocahontas. It makes a great story for Disney where a beautiful maiden saves a hero. However, at the time of this meeting, there is questionable evidence as to the background of Smith and how he had been saved before by other beautiful women, not to mention the fact that in 1607, he was 27, and Pocahontas would have only been 10, maybe 12 years old.

History, as Thomas King points out, “may well be a series of stories we tell about the past, but the stories are not just any stories. They’re not chosen by chance. By and large, the stories are about famous men and celebrated events. We throw in a couple of exceptional women every now and then, not out of any need to recognize female eminence, but out of embarrassment. And we’re not easily embarrassed.”

History is not always what we are taught to believe. King argues that our concept of history is often thought of as something grand happening, a national chronicle built upon by authenticities and truths that are melded together into narratives that explains how we get from one end to the other. This very fact is interesting because the stories we read in textbooks are presented as truth and we are taught not to question the stories that are told to us. To do so, goes against the accepted norm.

“The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America” is a book that once you pick up, you cannot put down. It takes you on a historical journey of examining the stories we are told throughout history, speaks about the relationship between non-Natives and Natives throughout the centuries, and has you wondering how we might tell a new story for the future. Thomas King fans will not be disappointed!

The Inconvenient Indian is published by DoubleDay Canada and is 288 pages.

2013 Review: The Manager

The Manager

Road trip romp an easy, predictable read

The Manager
Author: Caroline Stellings
Published by Cape Breton University Press
Review by Shari Narine

The Manager by Caroline Stellings is a quick, easy, no-surprise read. Or, as the boxing world would say, an easily telegraphed shot from family conflict to family resolution with a bit of razzle-dazzle thrown in.

Classified as a fiction for young people, The Manager is set in 1979 and tells the story of the Mackenzies, a boxing family, which struggles to succeed both as a family and in the boxing world.
The story is told in first person by younger sister Ellie. Her mother is dead, her father is a boxing-obsessed man who runs a struggling gym, and her older sister Tina is a boxing-obsessed young woman who suffers from dwarfism.

When Tina hears about a medical procedure that could cure her dwarfism, she convinces Ellie to accompany her to Boston, where the operation will take place. So the pair leaves their home of Whitney Pier, a neighborhood in the industrial part of Sydney, with Bonita, the older daughter of a shop-owner friend who owns a car.

Along the way they meet a young Mi’kmaw boxer, Jesse Mankiller. As fate would have it – or perhaps a simple, straightforward plot – Jesse needs a manager and Tina takes the job. As they move through the boxing circuit, they meet a backwoods family in Maine, complete with lusty boy-crazy, breast-baring twins; fall into the good graces of a mobster; and have sufficient money to eat meals and get hotel rooms.

The characters are all too likeable and their flaws are all surface. Stellings misses the opportunity to dig deeply into what makes them who they are. Or as Tina would say, Stellings misses the combination. She’s “throwing one punch at a time. No good. Jab, jab, hook.”

Stellings has brought together a group of visibly different people but chooses to tell the story from the point of view of the only person who is “normal.” She has a wide array of characters –Bonita, who is black; Tina, the dwarf, and Jesse, the Indian – who could have offered a stronger, more poignant look at life on the road.

At one point, Bonita comments, “I know what it’s like to face discrimination on a daily basis, believe me.” But Stellings fails to deliver the hook on what could be a powerful theme; instead she jabs around it, pokes at a hint here and there, but never delivers the final knock-out blow.

She does the same thing with stereotypes.

There are the jabs. The first time the sisters meet Jesse it is on his mother’s Nova Scotia reserve. The family resides in a dilapidated trailer with a plywood door, Jesse’s mother is in a wheelchair, his sister is an alcoholic, and there are oodles of half-dressed little children running around. Another jab: Tina apologizes for assuming that Jesse’s father is in jail. Another jab: Tina assuming Jesse got stopped at the US-Canada border because he was driving a rich man’s car. But no hook: how does all of this come together to make Jesse the ultimate fighter?
Instead, the reader is introduced to the backwoods twins who want a piece of the boy-with-the-ponytail.

Instead, Stellings knocks it all down to a love story: in Ellie’s words (when she is not drooling all over Jesse or condemning Tina for not caring about their father), “Tina wanted to be loved.”

2013 Review: The Strength of Women: Ahkameyimowak

 Ahkameyimowak

 

Book Review by Christine Smith
The Strength of Women: Ahkameyimowak
By Priscilla Settee
Published by Coteau Books
121 pages

“The Strength of Women” celebrates women’s spirit as the backbone of Native communities, and the stories within are about 15 incredible Native women who show vision, inspiration and leadership despite the challenges facing them throughout their lives.

Author Priscilla Settee says “Colonization has been particularly devastating for Native women. There are multiple ways women have disproportionately suffered from the affects of colonization, from sexual violence and forced sterilization to the undermining of women’s central role as community organizers, planners and leaders.”

Settee documents stories that show a range of life experiences that involve injustice, racism, genocide and sexism and of hope, awakening and fierce struggles. She uses the Cree word ‘ahkameyimowak’ to describe a strength that has helped women to survive, flourish and work for change.

“The Strength of Women” is divided into five sections: Beginnings, Work, Art, Spirit and Community. In the section, Beginnings, Aleyna May Stene writes an intriguing poem

“Did you ever worry about me
When I was running in the streets
You never asked
Never asked
“Where were you?”
You never cared where I was or what I did
Still to this day
I love you…”

The poem is especially moving because it is indicative of how story or poetry can contribute to a way of healing. After all, “in the Indigenous world, stories are a means of transmitting vital information from within our community as well as outside our communities.”

Settee explains “Women are the unsung heroes of their communities, often using minimal resources to challenge oppressive structures and create powerful alternatives in the arts, education and workplace.”

This is especially indicative of the women that are in this book, including Freda Ahenakew, a pioneer of First Nations women’s writing in the province of Saskatchewan, Rita Bouvier, a Saskatchewan educator, poet and writer, Judy Da Silva, who has been working in her community of Grassy Narrows to bring attention to the terrible legacy of environmental destruction caused by major pulp mills in her territory, Lindsey Knight, aka Eekwoll, a widely recognized youth model and rapper, Sally McKenzie, a community leader in health and community healing, Aleyna Mae Stene, a young urban Métis woman involved in the work organizing inner city youth, and Patricia Margaret Ningewance, an Anishnaabe-kwe linguist and artist.

This book is important in part because it features Native women as playing a central role in our culture. It speaks of an unwavering spirit and tenacity that often no one hears about, because women’s achievements and economic contributions are often not counted. The stories told within this collection are both inspiring and thought-provoking, and the reader becomes privy to some very strong women who fought against adversity to become leaders in their communities and beyond.

2013 Review: Tilly, A Story of Hope and Resilience

Tilly, A Story of Hope and Resilience cover

Tilly, A Story of Hope and Resilience
Author: Monique Gray Smith
Published by Sono Nis Press
Review by Shari Narine

It’s hard not to pull for Tilly. After all, who doesn’t want someone who becomes attached to alcohol when she’s in Grade 7 to conquer her demons?  But while Tilly, A Story of Hope and Resilience, does a remarkable job of entwining cultural teachings with Tilly’s passage from alcohol-dependency to alcohol-freedom, it does little to help the reader understand Tilly.

Tilly is a loosely-based autobiography of Monique Gray Smith. It is story-telling in its fullest, chronologically following main character Tilly’s life from the racist confrontation with a stranger on the sidewalk in Kelowna in 1974 to the death of her namesake grandmother when Tilly starts junior high and ending with Tilly’s marriage in a loving, wholesome relationship, and the birth of twins.

But it doesn’t delve into the character. It only provides a cursory examination.

I want to know why Tilly does what she does. I want to know why Tilly is finally ready to attend AA. I want to know why Tilly has the strength to not only walk away from the love of her life but to stay sober. I want to know why Tilly leaves her job as a nurse to be a helper for healing workshops. I want to know why Tilly becomes an alcoholic but her younger sister Marie doesn’t. I want to know Tilly. And I don’t.

Gray Smith does an admirable job in relating the Lakota teachings of Tilly’s grandmother; the Ojibway ways of Bea, the woman at the Native Friendship Centre, who counsels Tilly; the Sunrise ceremony and smudging at the treatment centre Tilly enters for the full six weeks. Gray Smith even touches on residential schools, Indian hospitals, Harper’s apology, and the ‘60s scoop.

But she also only touches on Tilly’s life.

At the midway point of the novel, Tilly writes, “I didn’t really know what made me happy. I’d become far removed from ‘me.’”
The problem is, the reader doesn’t know who Tilly was or is or why she becomes who she becomes.

Central to Tilly’s story seems to be her discovery of her culture. She writes that her counsellor Bea “understood the importance of culture in recovery.” Indeed, the treatment centre that Tilly eventually attends is marked by a sign stating “Culture is Treatment.”

There are numerous studies that recognize this statement as truth. Gray Smith devotes pages to talking about Tilly’s time in the treatment centre, what she learns, how she sticks out the full six weeks although for the first time ever she celebrates her birthday without her family. And though her roommate is a grandmother who befriends her, provides insight and guidance, the reader never learns how Tilly feels about everything.
Yes, she gets up early in the morning; yes, she likes to spend time by the river where it’s quiet; yes, she participates in the ceremonies. But what does this all mean to her? What does it change in her?

She states, “I quickly realized how powerful it was to greet the day in a sacred way, from a grounded place and a place of thankfulness.”

But what does that mean for Tilly? How does she take this and use it when she learns that the man she loves has betrayed her with lies? After this devastation, Tilly stays strong, never goes back to drinking. I want to know why. How did what she learn in the treatment centre give her this strength? How was she able to hold on now?

Gray Smith does an excellent job describing and providing an understanding of First Nations cultural teachings and traditions – she even includes a glossary at the end of the novel – but it leaves me still wanting to know the heart and soul of Tilly.

2014 Review: Ghost Detective

Ghost Detective

Ghost Detective

Zachary Muswagon

(Published by Eschia Books Inc.)

Review by Shari Narine

 

Ghost Detective is an engaging blend of supernatural and whodunit
wrapped around life on the reserve. It could easily have remained a
mystery novel with a twist, but author Zachary Muswagon makes it more as
he explores the conditions on reserves and the reasons that motivate
the antagonists.

Clearly written and easily read, Ghost Detective spins the tale of
the Ghostkeeper cousins, Billy and Dale, both of whom are flawed but
likeable, as they make their way through the unnamed Rez, trying to
piece together the murder of, yes, Billy Ghostkeeper.

Dale is Billy’s reluctant helper, drawn into the fray when Billy
reminds Dale that he saved Dale’s life from gang leader Gar all those
years ago when Dale was in Grade 7.

Ghost Detective also blends the traditional ways with the modern
ways. Billy is helped along by the Crow, his spirit guide. Crotchety
Aunt Kena, who has the Eyes of Fire, can talk to Billy (and others in
the spirit world) directly but Dale has to depend on his Bluetooth for
communication with Billy the ghost.

As the two work their way through the mystery of Billy’s death, two
suspects become clear. First, gang leader Gar. In this way, Muswagon
tackles the issue of the ever-growing problem of gangs on reserves. A
little heavy-handed in his dealing of the topic, Muswagon refers to the
gang members as thugs who are wanna-be great Aboriginal warriors.

The second suspect is DBA Resources executive Grant, whose oil
company pumps so much money into the Rez that Billy, who holds the
position of assistant band compliance officer, turns a blind eye –
initially - to the company’s deadly infractions. Muswagon is blatant in
slamming big oil for its unethical behaviour and its never-failing
pursuit of the dollar.

DBA Resources is so bad that at one point a dead Billy is confronted
by the ghosts of two children, who died of leukemia and who lived at a
house where Billy fudged water and air emission sample results. Muswagon
also takes an anti-government stand, with Grant telling Dale that even
if Billy had damning information against the company, the government
would not shut down a multinational billion dollar corporation,
regardless of deaths.

But of course, no whodunit is complete without a twist and Ghost Detective offers just that.

And more.  Muswagon examines the conditions on the reserves, pointing
to housing on Attawapiskat First Nation, and the attitudes of the
public towards the deaths of Aboriginal people, naming the Pickton
murders as one example.

But all is not lost for Billy. Before his death, Billy is on the road
to redemption and in his death, he finds forgiveness from the two
children he inadvertently led to their deaths, and he also connects with
his cousin. Billy realizes that he has been selfish and points out to
Dale, that while the younger cousin is a poser, he’s also a good guy who
has stepped up to help Billy out more than he needed to. Billy learns
to control his ghost body and understand his role in the spirit world in
time to help solve his murder and get the help of Aunt Kena to rescue
Dale.

Ultimately, Ghost Detective is about trying to balance the
traditional ways of caring for the land and the people with moving
forward and providing for the people on the reserve. Can that happen?
Says spirit guide Bear to Crow, “We’re moving in the right direction,
but we still have a long way to go.”

Buffalo Spirit: Recommended readings

Teachings from the Longhouse

By Chief Jacob Thomas with Terry Boyle

Stoddart Publishing Co. Limited

151 pages (sc) $17.95

The late Jacob Thomas was hereditary chief of the Six Nations and one of North America's leading Native traditionalists. In Teachings from the Longhouse, he both shares and preserves the teachings of Handsome Lake, a Seneca Indian born in 1735 who developed a code of conduct for his people to live by to help them survive the changes brought about by European contact. That code has survived to the present, handed down orally and delivered twice a year in traditional longhouses.

 

 


The Good Path: Ojibwe Learning and Activity Book for Kids

 

By Thomas Peacock and Marlene Wisuri Afton

Historical Society Press

127 pages (sc) $17.95 (U.S.)

The Good Path introduces children, Native and non-Native, to the history, stories and beliefs of the Ojibwe people. The book looks at the lessons of co-operation, courage and honor that make up the Good Path, and gives young readers activities that make them think about what they have read, and to encourage them to learn more. 

 


 

Returning to the Teachings: Exploring Aboriginal Justice

By Rupert Ross

Penguin Books

287 pages (sc) $19.99

As an assistant Crown attorney in northwest Ontario, Rupert Ross has been responsible for criminal prosecutions on more than 20 Cree and Ojibway First Nations.In his first book, Dancing with a Ghost, Ross looked at Aboriginal approaches to justice. In this second book, Returning to the Teachings, published in 1996, Ross looks at the role that traditional teachings and healing have within Aboriginal communities across the country, where the approach to justice is not to punish, but to heal.

Rare Intellect - Recommended Readings



April

Inuit art, past & present

Inuit Art: An Introduction
By Ingo Hessel
Photography by Dieter Hessel
Douglas & McIntyre
198 pages (sc)
$45
Review by Cheryl Petten

From a tiny ivory maskette carved by the Arctic's ancient inhabitants, to contemporary works created using both traditional and non-traditional styles and mediums, Inuit Art: An Introduction uses a mix of text and photographs to bring to the reader thousands of years of art, blanketed in the historical, cultural and societal contexts that helped form it.

While many factors have influenced the art created by the people of the Arctic, the largest of these, it can be argued, was contact with European newcomers to the area-missionaries, explorers, and traders-beginning in the late 1700s.
The book looks at the effects of this contact, which brought about a shift from Inuit artists creating items for themselves to creating them for a new and growing southern market.

Production of Inuit art today is no longer so bound to the whims of the southern outsiders, but Inuit artists are still well aware that, while they have more creative freedom than the artists that went before them, they still have to create works that appeal to the southern market if they intend to make a living with their craft.

The book dedicates most of its attention to contemporary Inuit art, looking at the various mediums being used by today's artists, as well as the themes and subjects that dominate their work-animals, the supernatural, illustrating myths and legends, the family, or scenes from everyday life.

The predominant styles of sculpture in the different areas of the Arctic are also examined, as are the work of some of the new breed of Inuit sculptor, who are finding their own balance between Inuit tradition and southern influence.

While the main focus of the book is on sculpture, mainly because that is the format most often chosen by Inuit artists, both graphic arts (drawing, printmaking and painting) and textile arts (weaving and sewing) are also examined.

The book has something to offer anyone with an interest in Inuit art. Those already familiar with the subject will find in the book a wonderful collection of photographs and reproductions of Inuit art from a variety of regions and time periods, and in a number of medium, formats and styles. And for those with little or no knowledge about the subject of Inuit art? This book can definitely change that.


Joane Cardinal-Schubert
Multi-media artist, writer

Recommends:
Vagina Monoloques

By Eve Ensler
Random House-2000

"On Feb. 14 and 15, I was part of a community theatre collective with producer Tantoo Cardinal and actors Michelle Thrush, Wilma Pelly, and director Robin Melting Tallow, as well as local luminaries (as the rest of us were described), who participated in the reading of the Vagina Monologues at the University of Calgary. This year was a special focus on Aboriginal women and girls, calling for an end to violence. As such, Tantoo read a special monologue entitled Crooked Braid written by Eve Ensler for the Lakota women. The Calgary performance included a slide-show tribute to missing and murdered local Aboriginal women, and those who disappeared in Vancouver. The director asked me to include some images of my paintings as well. Although the book is not one I would have chosen without this community involvement, I was surprised, informed, and invigorated by the expansion of the text into a theatre event, which personally allowed me to pursue an old theatre interest, as well as to be part of an Aboriginal collective that was providing support and information for other women."

 


James K. Bartleman
Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

Recommends:
The Bridge of San Luis Rey

By Thornton Wilder
New York: Albert & Charles Boni-1927

Literature should serve purposes other than mere entertainment. At their best, books provide readers with insights into their own lives and those of others. Thus The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder, published in 1927 and available in any library, is one of my great favorites. Set in colonial Peru, this short book tells the stories of five people who fell to their deaths when a bridge over a deep valley collapsed. Read it to bring a deeper meaning into your life.

 



May

We all sing together
The Master Butchers Singing Club
By Louise Erdrich
HarperCollins
389 pages
$39.95 (hc)
Review by Suzanne Methot

Chippewa writer Louise Erdrich usually writes about Aboriginal people in her novels, which detail the interconnected lives of the Morrissey, Kashpaw, Lamartine, Lazarre, Nanapush, and Pillager families of North Dakota. In her eighth novel, using her own German-American ancestors as inspiration, Erdrich turns to non-Native characters.

The Master Butchers Singing Club begins with Fidelis Waldvogel, a sniper in the German Army who returns home after the First World War and marries Eva, the pregnant girlfriend of his best friend, who was killed in the war. Fidelis, trained as a master butcher, then sets off to find his fortune in America-and ends up in Argus, N.D. Fidelis, opens a butcher shop in the town, sends for Eva, and their lives eventually intersect with Delphine Watzka, a young woman who becomes Eva's confidante and a surrogate mother to her four sons. The novel follows Fidelis, Eva, Delphine, and the Waldvogel boys through the next 36 years, as they build their lives, face death, and learn to love.

Those familiar with Erdrich's other novels will recognize some of the settings in this book, but will meet entirely new characters. The good news is that Erdrich's non-Native characters are just as interesting as her Native ones. The Master Butchers Singing Club is filled with the usual cast of colorful Erdrichean individuals: an outcast garbage picker, an incorrigible alcoholic, a mean-spirited spinster, a traveling showman, and a feminist undertaker, among others. (The showman is Delphine's sometime lover, Cyprian Lazarre. He is one of two Native characters in the book, both of whom are important to the story but rather marginal in its telling.)

Like the previous novels, this book shifts back and forth among various narrative voices, but it features a much flatter and more linear timeline than any of Erdrich's other books. At one point, the author careens from a discussion of kids' toys to Fidelis's sausages to her school days with her undertaker friend in less than one page. But that accelerated pace also makes certain scenes- when one of the Waldvogel boys is trapped inside a mound of construction dirt, when Eva needs pain medicine for her cancer- stand out in sudden intensity. Their importance is highlighted by their incremental, concentrated sensibility.

Erdrich uses a blend of poetic language, surreal circumstances, and humor to convey the intricate connections of small towns: the debts, the secrets, the public and private faces, the assigned roles. As she reveals those connections, she shows the balance people must strike between happiness and misery, killing and living, and life and death.

Fidelis's cronies in the Argus singing club are of different nationalities. They sing together and share songs from their cultures.

All of the seemly disparate ideas in the book come together when Erdrich reveals the identity of the most accomplished master butcher, and the choir she conducts in the sky. The truth is, we sing alongside each other. In the spirit world, there are no sides. It is humans who choose sides.

A truly wonderful book.


Kim Ghostkeeper
Conference co-ordinator, Ghostkeeper Synergetics Inc.

Recommends:

A Fine Balance

By Rohinton Mistry
McClelland & Stewart-1995

For most of my life I haven't been much of a reader, so my selection of a book with 748 pages to read is rather amazing in itself. I've never really appreciated the gift of reading. Mostly reading has been a necessity, not something I did for pure enjoyment. When I started reading A Fine Balance I wasn't even sure I'd be able to finish it. In fact, the book had been originally purchased as a gift for a more prolific reader in my family, but since they hadn't picked it up, I decided to give it a go.

The book consumed me and called me to it each time I put it down. It was so engaging and such a compelling story that I decided to choose it as my book of choice for this assignment. A Fine Balance is a gritty story set in India in the 70s.

It's about four main characters drawn together under unusual circumstances. It paints a world of poverty so devastating that at times I had to set it aside. As I flipped pages describing a world so foreign to me with its caste system, religious fractions and politics, it proved that a great story can capture and keep even the slowest reader engaged while exposing them to a worldview that is hard and harsh and perhaps even beyond our own comprehension. And yet, within it, the telling of a story of how the smallest ray of hope can be the catalyst for enormous change.


John Bernard
President, Donna Cona
Recommends:

Out Of Muskoka

By James Bartleman
Punumbra Press-2002

For most of my adult life I have been attempting to explain what it was like growing up on a First Nation and having a Maliseet father and an American/Italian mother. After reading about James Bartleman's life in Out of Muskoka, I felt humbled and enlightened all at the same time. Out of Muskoka is truly a masterpiece and I often refer to it when talking about my own life growing up.

 

 



 

June

Build a better you

The Tiny Warrior: A Path to Personal Discovery
and Achievement
By D. J. Eagle Bear Vanas
Andrew McMeel Publishing (Kansas City)
63 pages, $9.95 US (s.c.)
Review by D. L. Webster

You've seen the child struggle through his teen years. You've tried in your own way to give him guidance, but some young people refuse to hear another point of view.

You've seen the choices he makes lead him down difficult, even dangerous, roads. Now, as a young adult, he's troubled, frustrated, down on himself and the world, angry about his past and pessimistic about the future.

One day he comes to you and says 'I need your help.' What magic words will you offer to ease his pain? What wisdom will you impart that will set him on a good path? How will you respond?

The answers to these questions are found in a slim little book called The Tiny Warrior by D.J. Eagle Bear Vanas, a motivational speaker of Odawa/Dutch descent. In just 60 or so pages, Vanas offers up a basketful of plain truth and deep wisdom with a charming story about Cricket, a young Indian boy, who desperately wants to be a warrior, but doesn't know how or even why.

Cricket's journey is set out in 10 easy-to-read chapters and recounted by Grandpa to Justin, his 27-year-old grandson whose choices in life have led him far away from his dream of becoming an engineer.

Justin, working in a dead-end construction job, comes home one day to find Grandpa sitting on the porch. A quiet visit turns into a series of powerful lessons that inspire a sea-change in Justin's life.

The beauty of this book is in its simplicity. According to Grandpa, "the simplest lessons in life are often the most powerful. Truth requires few words."

At first glance, this book seems to target the troubled youth who wants to make a change, or the concerned adult who wants to inspire change in a young person. In fact, this book will serve well every person who has a dream to be realized.

The book is sectioned off so that it can serve many purposes. Cricket's story can easily be taken and read as a bedtime story to very young children. Cricket's antics get him into a lot of trouble, but the lessons he learns from them lead him to discover the special place he holds in the hearts of his family and the community.

Take, for example, the time Cricket, who longs to be part of a group, decides to join a fun-loving pack of coyotes, tricksters who use him by pretending to be his friends.
He picks berries for them, hunts squirrels up trees for them, and even pulls rabbits from holes for the coyotes to eat, but when he finds himself in trouble, his friends don't come to Cricket's aid.

After each chapter about Cricket, Justin applies the lesson to his own life. He, too, had run with tricksters, who encouraged him to skip school, cut out of work early, and who let him down when he needed help. Justin's story helps older readers see how Cricket's experiences relate to them on a personal level.

At the end of each chapter there is a page that succinctly spells out the wisdom to be found in the story. In the case of the coyotes, there are six truths to be learned, paramount among them is that we must all choose our pack wisely.

This little book can be kept in a purse or coat pocket for quick reference or a daily dose of inspiration. According to Grandpa, "There is a tiny warrior that lives inside us all."

This little book will help you find that tiny warrior, develop his gifts, and feed his soul.


Rick Harp
Host, Contact,
APTN's national open-line program

Recommends:
Stolen From Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities

By Suzanne Fournier and Ernie Crey
Douglas & McIntyre-1997

With so many books out there worthy of attention, it is exceedingly difficult to pick just one. That said, I opted for a book that would offer something to both a long-time observer of Aboriginal affairs and someone who's brand new to our issues and concerns. Stolen From Our Embrace lays out in just 250 pages most of the immense, traumatic and unrelenting attacks Canada has inflicted on Indigenous peoples for the past 200 years. From residential schools to the ironically named 'child welfare' system, it documents how the impact of forced removal and relocation of Native people continues to play out today. Fournier and Crey do a masterful job of using personal testimony and thorough research to illustrate the personal toll of these criminal acts, such as sexual abuse and fetal alcohol syndrome. As you read through its pages, you realize what a miracle it is any of us are alive to tell the tale. Written in a straightforward, accessible manner, the book offers profound insight into how we got to where we are today, both good and bad. If you want a reminder or a record of how far we've come, and of how we have started to reclaim responsibility for our own wellness, this book is a must-read.

 

 


Duane Ghastant' Aucoin,
a.k.a.Cash Creek Charlie
First Nations cultural performer

Recommends:
Where the Wild Things Are

Stories and pictures by Maurice Sendak
HarperFestival-1992

OK, I know that this is a kids' book, but it had such a profound effect on me, even to this day. The reason being is that I can relate to its central theme. Inside of each of us is a place Where the Wild Things Are. Meaning, in a world of conformity and political correctness gone mad, the spirit of freedom and adventure can easily be lost. But all is not lost if we remember to, every now and then, put on our wolf suit and visit this place and let our spirits go wild.

 



July

Alexie's ordinary Indians

Did all those people in the World Trade Centre really die?
Or did some just walk away from miserable lives and start again...

Ten Little Indians
By Sherman Alexie
Grove Press
244 pages, $39.95 (hc)

Sherman Alexie is far from ordinary. The Spokane/Coeur d'Alene writer has written two novels, three books of short fiction, six books of poetry and one screenplay (for the film Smoke Signals). He is also a stand-up comedian, and recently wrote and directed his first film. But despite his extraordinary range, Alexie prefers to write stories about "ordinary" Indians.

His newest book, Ten Little Indians, is a collection of nine stories that, for the most part, describe ordinary Aboriginal people in the Pacific Northwest who face the ordinary pressures of work, school, home, and relationships.

The ordinary man in "Flight Patterns" has a house, a wife, a kid, and a sales job that has him on the road a lot. The ordinary woman in "The Search Engine" is a scholarship student with good grades and a nice mom.

The problem with Alexie's "ordinary" Indians is that they are not so ordinary, at least not to a young person on a remote reserve or a single mother in Winnipeg. Alexie's ho-hum attitude toward these characters' privileged circumstances is on the one hand admirable. (As the student in "The Search Engine" says, it may help "white folks finally [understand] that Indians are just as relentlessly boring, selfish, and smelly as they are.") On the other hand, however, any author who deliberately writes about "relentlessly boring" characters should expect some readers to be less than enthralled by these people and their pampered lives on the middle-class side of the tracks.

Although these characters inhabit a privileged world, the life-changing events they experience and the insights they share convey universal lessons. When the young lawyer responds to a racist incident with violence (in "Lawyer's League"), it stands to restrict his future choices, which might be just what he wants. When the man in "Flight Patterns" gets a taxi ride from an Ethiopian refugee, he realizes there are many ways people can leave behind the ones they love. These are simple tales, but Alexie doesn't tell them simplistically. In fact, he takes chances that other writers do not.

In one story, for example, he says the unsayable (at least in America) about 9/11: Did all those people in the World Trade Centre really die? Or did some just walk away from miserable lives and start again somewhere else? (Since the character in "Can I Get a Witness?" is Spokane, Alexie could also be asking whether or not Aboriginal people understand better the transformative aspects of disaster.)

Alexie has a wry sense of humor, and he uses that humor to criticize both Native and non-Native society. Sometimes he uses a soft touch (as when he mentions "highly sacred and traditional Indian bars"), and sometimes he lectures ("Let me tell you a dirty secret: Quite a few of the state's most powerful Indian men and women are functionally illiterate. There are tribal councilmen who cannot spell the word 'sovereignty.'").

Alexie is a smart guy, and he exposes the hypocrisies and failings of pretty much everyone, from white liberals to homeless Indians.

The problem with Ten Little Indians is that the characters' inner voices all sound alike. A character in one story uses a noun as a verb ("suicided"), and so does a character in the very next story ("earthquaked"). The author has characters in two stories talk about "Mr. Grief." "Mr. Death" is mentioned in another. All the characters are ironically self-reflective, and they express themselves in remarkably similar ways. Their personalities are also the same: most of these Indians are left-leaning, anti-capitalists who read lots of books. In fact, Alexie often seems to be writing about himself. Like many of his characters, he was a scholarship student and basketball champ.

All writers use their characters to put forward their own ideas, but Alexie is a lazy writer who changes only surface details (age, sex, job title) instead of creating complex characters that stand out from one another. (The one character who is different-a homeless man-still sounds like all the others.) He also never writes from the point of view of the councilman who can't spell "sovereignty," preferring instead to write from the point of view of educated characters like himself.


Bernd Christmas
Membertou CEO

Recommends:
Blindness

By Jose Saramago.
Harvill-1997

It is a novel about an epidemic of blindness that strikes a city. The authorities begin to isolate those people and put them in camps. One of the main character's husband is afflicted, but rather than be separated from him, she pretends she is blind like all others.

Eventually, everyone in this city is blinded and has been left to fend for themselves. The woman becomes somewhat of a leader attempting to help the blind "see". Without giving away the plot, the main characters have to survive as a group. As the story progresses we see the author describe the horrors human beings can inflict upon other human beings for the sake of survival. It truly gets sickening, but the glimmer of hope begins to arise when the group of main characters work together. I liked reading this book for two reasons. One, the old adage, no matter how bad you think you have it, there is always someone who is worse off, rings loud and clear. It makes you realize that you must be grateful for what you have. The second reason is that the novel is about being blind, both physically and emotionally. Sometimes we are so blind to who we are, where we are, how we are, that we become hurtful, greedy, cold, and heartless. We need to open our eyes to the world and experience life to the fullest. By seeing our inner selves we can see others in a positive light.

 


Brenda Chambers
TV Producer, Brenco Media Inc.

Recommends:
Leadership From Within

By Peter Urs Bender
The Achievement Group (republished 2002)

I am enjoying this book because it helps me to identify what I need to do for myself in my life and my work. I am very results-oriented, and I need to ensure that I can communicate my own desires personally and professionally. I think Windspeaker readers will enjoy this book because it helps to identify what personal traits they have and what they will need to do to make themselves happy. A lot of times in our community we blame other people for our sadness or situation, when in fact it is our own doing. I think this book a great tool to help us to take responsibility for ourselves and our communities.

 



 

August

Reality replaces romance

North Spirit: Travels Among The Cree And Ojibway Nations And Their Star Maps

By Paulette Jiles
Anchor Canada edition 2003
391 pages, $21(sc)
Review by Joan Taillon

In 1973, Paulette Jiles left behind a failed relationship in Toronto and accepted a CBC assignment to work in Big Trout Lake, where she helped establish a radio station that would be run by the local Aboriginal people. With a book of published poetry to her credit and work in progress on another, and a much greater body of publishing credits since, Jiles' precision with language comes through in a lyrical and evocative first-person account of her northern experience.

#She describes North Spirit as a book of creative non-fiction. Most of the book's characters are composites. So is the fictional community of North Spirit Lake, which is based on the real communities of Big Trout Lake and Sandy Lake. The events in the book are all true, the author says. North Spirit reads like a well-woven memoir, for that is what it is, selected accounts from a significant phase in an adventurous writer's life.

North Spirit is a lot more than that, however. Through Jiles' eyes, the reader gets to see the effect of the dawn of modern communications on remote communities and on Indian reserves in particular. A sense of nostalgia may come upon the reader for the traditional way of life that is vanishing in the sweep of technological change.

While the old values of sharing and caring remain, the compromises with the outsider culture are starkly evident. As television and VCRs creep in, consumerism gets a foothold, and the old gatherings for storytelling and family-centred entertainment decline. By the 1970s, the mythology that has underpinned both the stories and the beliefs of Indian peoples for eons is already fissured and split. Here and there, the old people remember and relate portions of their stories, and Jiles dutifully records them.

At the heart of Jiles' book, first published in hardcover in 1995, lies her fascination with the Star People and the night sky, and the Ojibway and Cree legends reflecting differing cultural beliefs about the constellations.

Anyone who has lived in the North will recognize that Jiles so often gets the details right: the culture shock on both sides, the daily interactions and interdependence of community life, the self-reliance and stoicism and humor of northern peoples, the seasonal transitions, the precarious balance of life and death.

Where Jiles falters a bit is in the first chapters, in places. There are a few too many speeches about the play she is writing, which struck me as self-absorbed and boring. I wondered if she had found it difficult to find a starting point for her tale. In addition, sometimes the dialogue by Native people just does not ring true-speeches there too-devices Jiles used to fold in the necessary exposition, when the likelihood is that a word or two, or a look, replaced a lot of the talk.

When Jiles describes something-a place, an incident-her voice is a waterfall cascading over little stones, eddying, carrying the reader deftly to a new experience, but the book would have benefited from stronger character development throughout.

The other weakness I found irritating for a book that has been reprinted several times is sloppy copyediting in the early pages, starting with page one of the preface. Either that improved after a few chapters, or my awareness of it was subsumed by a beautiful story told by a writer of great skill.


John Kim Bell
-Founder & President,
National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation

Recommends:
Barney's Version

By Mordecai Richler
Knopf Canada-1997

I recommend the book because it is exquisitely written by one of Canada's national treasures. It is a shame that due to Mr. Richler's untimely death, we will never again have the pleasure of reading another novel of such rich characters, wit and intellect. Not only does one laugh aloud while reading this opus, it is an experience that lasts well after the last page has been savored. It is a story about a man's three marriages, his friendships, children, business dealings and aging.

 

 


Dr. Cora Voyageur
Sociologist, University of Calgary

 

Recommends:
The Outlander series
by Diana Gabaldon
Dell Publishing-1991-2001

I am surrounded by books and must read as part of my job as a university professor. To me pleasure reading means escapism and using my imagination. I recommend the Outlander series. I came across these gems when my daughter Carly told me about this great historical fantasy she was reading. Trash I thought-looking down my academic nose. I purchased the entire series (Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, Drums of Autumn, and Fiery Cross) as her birthday gift-hiding the fact that Outlander was actually for me. Since then, these books have become my guilty pleasure and I cannot put them down. Diana Gabaldon tells the story of Clare Randall, a British Second World War nurse who accidentally steps through a standing stone and is transported back 200 years to rural Scotland where she meets Jamie Fraser. Gabaldon weaves a tale of historical adventure and romance that whisks the reader away to 18th century England, Scotland, and United States. These books are well-written, intriguing, and at times a bit racy. They are not for the faint of heart, each running about 750 pages. This is escapist, pleasure reading at its finest. Enjoy.

 

Review: Shoot!

Shoot! Book Review cover

A refreshing tale told with imaginative short stories

Shoot!
By George Bowering
New Star Books
253 pages (sc)
$19.00

Review by Chereise Morris

Shoot! Is set in the late 19th century in British Columbia and focuses on the little known McLean gang which was notorious in their day.

Shoot! begins with the McLean boys' parents background, going on to pieces of the boys lives, then illustrating how their hatred for rich ranchers and ‘land grabbers’ eventually leads them to their execution.  
The McLean gang consisted of three McLean brothers Allan, Charlie, Archie and one friend Alex Hare; they are all Métis and come from abusive or negative parents. Raised with no real place in the world the boys seek to carve out their own place with lives full of crime and bragging.

They rampage across the high Chilcotin ranch country of British Columbia in the 1870s, cattle rustling, stealing and eventually murdering two men in cold blood; this act sparks the change from wanted posters to a posse of over 100 men giving chase. At the time of their execution the youngest of the gang was 14 years old.

With approximately 60 books under his belt the British Columbian, award-winning author George Bowering began writing fiction novels in 1967. Born in 1935 with a B.A. in history as well as a M.A. in English literature, Bowering has been recognized as one of the foremost Canadian writers of his generation.

The book has so many threads of different ‘side’ stories, readers will have to pay close attention to grasp the complexities of the tale. At random, the book will wander from the McLean’s to provide imaginative short stories in the same premise of the times, further illustrating the machinations of the storyline.

Shoot! is a book of historiographic metafiction filled mainly with examples of the prevalent prejudice of that century and followed closely by injustice, greed and violence.

The book is loaded with examples of racism in part when referring to the Mclean brothers. Near the end of the novel, when the judge is ‘explaining’ to the courtroom the ‘epidemic’ of ‘half breeds’ and states that the mixture of the white man with an Indian woman provides the offspring with a level of ‘training’ from the fathers blood but still not up to the ‘father's grade’.

Shoot! is made interesting by the detailed attributes of each member of the gang, provided or imagined by Bowering, which when mixed with the little published facts about the gang makes for a refreshing tale.

Review: Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians

Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians Book Review cover

Book examines the  history of the Rock Cree through stories

Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians
Compiled by: Robert A. Brightman
Canadian Plains Research Center
185 pages (sc)
$29.95
Review by L. Christine Suthers

Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians was first published in 1980 by the Canadian Museum of Civilization and later released in 2007 by the Canadian Plains Research Center.

The stories presented in the book were compiled by Roger Brightman and are narratives from the Rock Cree in northwestern Manitoba. There are over 100 narratives. The folk literature includes medicine stories, humourous stories and stories of animal marriages and transformation.

The folklore narratives included in Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians are told to Brightman in English, some related to him in Cree and translated to English. Some of the narratives were from either Cree or English transcriptions.

The Cree expressions used by the narrators are retained in the Cree dialect. Some of the narrations are presented completely in the Cree dialect with the full English translation following.

Brightman includes a short history of the various dialects of the Rock Cree and in which regions these dialects are located. He includes a discussion of the structure and sequencing of w+sahk+chk the trickster-transformer stories between the different versions of some stories told.

Brightman includes bibliographical references within the text of the book and a list of the citations at the end.
Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians is for anyone who has a serious interest in learning more about the Rock Cree, their myths, legends and history through the stories and discussions presented in this book.

Classroom Edition

The Need


There is no question that Aboriginal youth need to access information and be exposed to a variety of views on issues that will impact their future. As tomorrow's leaders and decision makers, our youth must be given opportunities to consider different viewpoints, so that they may be better capable of making informed decisions for themselves and their communities.

Classroom Edition is now a regular part of Windspeaker now called "Canadian Classroom". Each issue of Windspeaker will dedicate two full pages without advertising to dedicate to exploring some critical issues.

The information contained in Canadian Classroom can play an instrumental role in breaking down barriers and increase understanding between individuals, communities and cultures.

Various views on a single issue are presented along with thought provoking questions to encourage dialogue and open communication. Editorial cartoons and photos will be utilized to further stimulate thought and dialogue.

A New Vision - A New Start

Bert Crowfoot CEO AMMSA Classroom Edition"Windspeaker continues its commitment to our youth by providing them with an educational tool that explores issues relevant to our future as Aboriginal people. It is Windspeaker's vision that open dialogue and free exchange of views will empower our youth and secure our future."

Bert Crowfoot

Windspeaker Publisher and AMMSA CEO


Windspeaker, Canada's National Aboriginal News Source is excited to announce that it is continuing its educational initiative specifically designed for use by Canada's youth!

Each month Windspeaker will dedicate several pages to explore critical issues in education impacting Aboriginal people.

"Windspeaker's commitment to Aboriginal youth has never been greater. Our goal is to provide Canada's schools with access to a unique Aboriginal educational toolbox. Windspeaker's Classroom Edition and its many partners are playing a fundamental role in positively impacting our future as Aboriginal people. It is Windspeaker's belief that open dialogue and free exchange of views will enable greater understanding and sensitivity of Aboriginal issues, culture, and dreams." Bert Crowfoot, Windspeaker publisher.

Issue #4

October 1997

Classroom Edition, traditional

TOPICS:

Conflict resolution: People need to find the middle ground

Tradition and addiction: the cost of tobacco on Aboriginal life

Saavy leaders learn to communicate through the press

The Indian Act - Serious Internal Error: Discontinue use

Aboriginal language - When it's gone, that's it. No more Indians

ASSOCIATE SPONSOR:
Syncrude Canada Ltd.

CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS:
Makivik Corporation
Pepsi Cola Canada Ltd.



Conflict resolution: People need to find the middle ground

By Rob McKinley

Windspeaker Staff Writer

The New Webster Encyclopedic Dictionary describes the noun dispute as, "strife, or contest in words or by arguments; a difference of opinion; vigorously maintained; controversy in words; a wordy war. . . "

In Aboriginal terms a dispute can all to often mean unrest, violence, and turmoil in small, close-knit communities. Disputes can come in many forms, but many stem from the way a chief and council governs a First Nation.

Many times disputes come from within the community, others can involve the Aboriginal community and a municipality, province or nation. No matter where the battle lines are drawn, it often takes a variety of measures to quell the unrest.

Karen Trace has been dealing with dispute resolution and mediation for the last five years as a partner in the Edmonton law firm McCuaig Desrochers.

She has been called into Native communities to ease concerns over government issues, election disputes, band management, land control, environmental issues and third party agreements.

Coming into any one of these situations, Trace said a good mediator has to look past the outlying problem and into the heart of the matter, which in most cases is also the heart of the community.

"Mediators in this jurisdiction are schooled in the theory of interest-based dispute resolution," she said, explaining "interest-based" as being "focus on the needs, wants, concerns and hopes of a community, to look at what motivates them at the surface."

Once you peel the issue back to its roots, "you open up the possibility for creative solutions. . . that truly meet with what is bugging the people."

Half of the battle is getting the people to the table to discuss their concerns, said Trace, who also teaches an alternative dispute resolution class at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Law.

For Aboriginal communities in particular, the mediation process is desirable, Trace said. Getting together and talking out problems and concerns is a traditional way of life for most Native communities, she said.

"It is the best way to heal and to grow and to better the community."

She admitted that dispute resolution is not always seen in a positive light. The harsh truth is that some disputes are settled through the mediation process with lawyers only to resurface a year later. Lawyers are then painted as the only ones getting ahead in the process.

Trace said it is the attitude and care of the lawyers involved that provide the best results in mediation. The successful mediation results in no winners and no losers, but a satisfied room of people.

Trace's firm boasts an impressive 80 per cent success rate in all dispute resolution files they take - Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal.

But that number could be higher. It all depends on how you define success, Trace said.

"What is success? Is it just settlement or is it successful enough when people get into a room and talk things out."

Bill Erasmus, grand chief of the Dene Nation, is another person who often tries to bring disputing parties to some sort of amicable agreement. In most of all the instances where he has mediated, the underlying factor is the same, Erasmus said.

"When there is a dispute, it's not because people want one. It's because they just developed. What they do want is to settle the dispute."

Erasmus said part of the role of any First Nation chief and council is to be there when the people need assistance. Chiefs and councils have a lot of history of their communities, he said. That background can often help cut to the core of the dispute.

"We have to be everything to everyone. We have to have counselling skills, patience, understanding, community history and family history," he said. All too often people get so swept up in the art of disputing, that they lose sight of the initial problem. They also lose sight of their roots.

"People have been arguing for so long and don't even realize they are related to each other, so that's when knowing the family history is important," he said.

Too many times the issue takes a back seat to personal feelings, Erasmus said.

"It's human relations, that is what you are dealing with," he said.

To get past that, Erasmus said mediators and go-betweens must realize that one side cannot win a dispute.

"You have to be neutral. You can't choose sides," he said. "If only one side wins then the dispute starts over again very quickly."

Instead of a victory, the end result should be a compromise. That compromise must be made by the disputing parties, not the mediator.

As the person in the middle, "you are not the one to resolve it. They do that. All you are is a go-between or a conduit."

After years of experience and countless negotiations, Erasmus said there is no secret to conflict resolution, but at the same time there is no formula either.

"You have to go with what you have. There's no book out there that tells you how to do it. You have to go by your instincts."

Erasmus said disputes have been taking place since time began, but lately the issues have been getting into the mainstream spotlight.

He isn't sure if shedding more light onto disputes can do harm or will benefit First Nations groups in Canada.
Jane Woodward with the Native Studies program at Edmonton's Grant MacEwan Community College, said the average Canadian is seeing more and more Native issues in the media these days, and part of that increase is due to disputes and troubles in the Native communities.

"We do get a lot of ink, but not a whole lot is positive," she said, adding that bad press can lead to some good exposure.

"We've always had media attention because everything we do is new, different and exotic" compared to mainstream society, she said.

Recent media coverage in Alberta regarding financial troubles at the Stoney Reserve near Calgary and conflict between the council and band members at the Samson Reserve in Hobbema, along with past disputes like the Oka crisis in Quebec, is an opening that Native communities could use to their advantage, she said.

Media attention, because of disputes, could be used to highlight other, more positive aspects of Native communities, she said.

"What people are getting now is just the tip of the iceberg," Woodward said. "Little by little we chip away at it and it's an education really."

Mel Buffalo, the president of the Indian Association of Alberta said it is either fortunate or unfortunate that Native disputes are now being "caught in the public eye."

He said the provincial office of his organization has been fielding calls from First Nation members from across the province about problems on several reserves.

Buffalo said the reason why so many disputes are now coming to the surface is not clear, but it might be due to the economy and the lack of money making it to Native communities.

Buffalo said disputes are not only taking place in Aboriginal communities, but across the board.

"It seems like its happening more," he said.

In many cases it is the accountability of leadership that is in question. More people are speaking out about their leaders, he said.

In order to work out a dispute, Buffalo said community members need to be brought into the picture.

If troubles are taking place at a band level, the band membership must be kept informed, he said.

Although there is a tendency to keep band politics and troubles a private matter, the public deserves to know what is going on. Otherwise more problems can arise.
"It's an in-house matter, but it also has to be quasi-public," he said.

David Newhouse, the chairman and associate professor at Trent University's Department of Native Studies in Peterborough, Ont., believes the best way to settle disputes is to change the system of government used by Aboriginal people on First Nations.

He said providing true self government to First Nations would solve many of the problems now being faced.
In fact, he said, the issues and concerns now occurring on First Nations across Canada are a positive step. It means that a change is needed.

Disputes now, said Newhouse, can be attributed to the inability of many First Nations to work under guidelines created by the Federal government and a European style of democracy.

A separate style of government created by Native people and for Native people could alleviate some of the current problem areas, he said.

Accountability is one of the areas that needs to be re-addressed, he said. The people have very little say about how their communities are run.

"There's very little local input into a local First Nation government," he said. That is not, however, the fault of the leadership in most First Nations, he said. Existing tribal policy, for the most part, does not allow for that kind of input.

"There are very few mechanisms in place to help [a chief and council] report to the citizens about what it is doing, so therefore you get a lot of disputes," he said.

Off reserves, the mainstream government structure allows for public input. Newhouse said there are planning groups, advocacy groups and citizens councils to help bridge the gap between the leaders and the people. The rights and formation of such groups is included in municipal government acts across Canada. Most Native communities don't have those avenues available to them.

In a 1992 report on the status of Aboriginal government, Newhouse indicates that it should be up to the people to set their own policy and provide avenues for appeal of that policy. If it all stays in-house, the Aboriginal people will have a greater sense of self-worth and be better able to deal with their own problems.

Even with these new policies in place, Newhouse said disputes would still take place. No matter what a government does, it will not please all of the people all of the time.

"There are always going to be disputes between government and policy and the people," he said. "The development of government has never been smooth. It will take a series of steps to get to self government.
But with a more open system that brings the people represented in a First Nation closer to the leadership, finding a compromise may come a little easier than holding blockades and sit-ins.

What we are seeing in First Nations across the country, he said, with the blockades and sit-ins and calls for band financial audits, is a sign that things are ready for change. They are not negative occurrences, but positive signs that things need to be altered.

"We are beginning to see the stress cracks," said Newhouse. "I'm not convinced that things coming apart is a sign of bad things. It's a start to move toward self government and that's a very healthy sign," he said.



Tradition and addiction: the cost of tobacco on Aboriginal life

All tobacco is a very powerful and dangerous substance. Whether it is gathered in the wild, raised by Native Americans, or purchased in the form of cigarettes, cigars and other commercial products, tobacco has the power to cause very serious illness and death. When used properly and with respect, in small amounts in traditional American Indian ceremonies, tobacco is a positive source of power. When misused, especially in the form of cigarettes, snuff, cigars and other commercial products, tobacco is a deadly killer. - Information from the Traditional Native American Tobacco Seed Bank and Education Program.

By Kenneth Williams
Windspeaker Staff Writer

Numerous health problems plague Aboriginal people: HIV and AIDS, diabetes, alcohol or other substance abuse, and suicide are just a few. The human cost is enormous as these problems do more than just claim the lives of the victims. There is often longer-term secondary damage done as a result of these illnesses. The break-up of families, the strain on health care resources, and the imperceptible cost to communities that lose productive members are all part of the fall-out.

As bad as these health problems are, they are recognized and, to a greater or lesser extent, treated. But one of the most damaging health threats is one that is the most preventable, yet plagues Aboriginal people more than any other: tobacco addiction.

Aboriginal people in North America have the highest rate of smoking than any other population. A 15-year study in the United States showed that the American Indian and Alaskan Native adult population had about 40 per cent rate of tobacco use. This is the highest percentage when compared to the African-American, Asian, Hispanic and White adult populations.

The numbers are worse in Canada. According to a recent Health Canada survey, 57 per cent of Aboriginal adults and 54 per cent of Aboriginal teenagers are smokers. Worse yet, these numbers may indeed be higher. An analysis of the data indicated that Aboriginal people under-report smoking in surveys conducted by non-Aboriginal people. Just for comparison, the national rate of smoking is 31 per cent.

The Inuit had the highest percentage of smokers of any group in Canada with 72 per cent of the adult population using the product. Inuit youth (19 years or younger) reported a 71 per cent rate of smoking.

"It's a tragedy," said Garfield Mahood, executive director of the Ottawa based Non-Smokers' Rights Association. "It's another indication of the exploitation of another population in this country. Given that one out of every two users will be killed by the product, that means a lot preventable death."

Aboriginal people, however, have had a long term relationship with tobacco. It is a plant indigenous to North and South America. The tobacco used in commercial cigarettes today is a descendent from a species that the Spaniards took from the Arawak and Carib Indians of the Caribbean. But the plant today bears little resemblance to its ancestor because it has been altered through 500 years of selective breeding to increase it's nicotine potency and leaf size.

Before the arrival of Columbus, Aboriginal people never used tobacco for recreational purposes. It was, and is, a powerful plant that was ingested - smoked or chewed - for strictly religious purposes. That quickly changed after European contact. The Spaniards saw the profitable potential of tobacco and began using the leaves and seeds for trade. Pretty soon newer strains were being created for milder flavor and bigger leaves. This was called 'trade tobacco.'

The European nations that settled eastern North America used tobacco for trading. Aboriginal people soon picked up the habit and started smoking trade tobacco recreationally. Tobacco never lost its religious significance, but the original strains used for ceremonies became rarer because they weren't traded. Inevitably, trade tobacco began to be used in religious ceremonies because it was easier to find. It is now common for commercial tobacco to be used at Aboriginal sacred ceremonies without a second thought to its lack of it spiritual significance.

The increased nicotine potency of trade tobacco also ensured that addiction the product was much easier. Nicotine can be lethal on its own, but in a commercially produced cigarette, it is but one of 4,700 chemical compounds found in the product, including 43 cancer-causing substances.

According to a Health Canada report called Eating Smoke: A Review of Non-Traditional Use of Tobacco Among Aboriginal People , smoking tobacco causes 85 per cent of all lung cancers and is linked to cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, pancreas, stomach, kidney, ureter, bladder and colon. It has also been linked to some cases of leukemia and 30 per cent of cervical cancer cases in women. In total, about 30 per cent of all cancer deaths are related to smoking cigarettes.

But that's not all. Smokers are at a higher risk of suffering cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke, sudden death, heart attack, peripheral vascular disease and aortic aneurysm. Smoking is also the leading cause of pulmonary (lung related) illnesses due to respiratory infection, pneumonia, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and influenza.

According to Health Canada, Aboriginal men living on reserves have a 40 per cent higher death rate from stroke than other Canadians. Aboriginal women on reserves have a 62 per cent higher rate of heart disease. Lung cancer is a major cause of death among Inuit people, with Inuit women having one of the highest rates in the world. All of these can be traced to smoking.

But smokers aren't the only ones who suffer.
Environmental tobacco smoke, otherwise known as second-hand smoke, is just as dangerous. The Environmental Protection Agency in the United States has declared environmental tobacco smoke a class "A" carcinogen, which means it causes cancer in humans.
Non-smokers who live with smokers have a 30 per cent higher risk of death from heart attack and lung cancer. The longer the non-smoker is exposed to smoke, the higher the risk.

A recent study indicated that Aboriginal babies died from sudden infant death syndrome at a rate three-times higher than the Canadian average. The Canadian average of sudden infant death syndrome is 0.7 per 1,000 births, whereas the Aboriginal average is 2.5 per 1,000 births. According to Dr. Michael Moffat, a pediatrician at the University of Manitoba and a researcher working on the study, smoking was a major factor in this statistic.

Lead researcher, Dr. Elske Hidles-Ripstein, found that Aboriginal mothers were more than twice as likely as non-Aboriginal mothers to smoke during their pregnancies. Her findings indicated that 53 per cent of Aboriginal mothers smoked while pregnant compared to just 26 per cent of non-Aboriginal mothers.

In the April 1996 issue of Pediatrics magazine, a study examined the relationship between women smoking during pregnancy and the rate of mental retardation in their babies. The researchers from Emory University, the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, and Battelle Centres for Public Health, Research and Evaluation discovered that women who smoked were 50 per cent more likely to have a child with mental retardation - an IQ of 70 or less - of an unknown medical origin than non-smoking mothers.higher rates of spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, lower birth weight babies and complications during delivery. It has also been discovered that nursing mothers can pass the harmful chemicals from tobacco to the infant even though the baby has not been directly exposed to second-hand smoke. Evidence also shows that second-hand smoke can cause developmental delays and behavioral problems in children.

Young women are picking up the smoking habit faster than any other segment of the population. This trend has meant that lung cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death for women, surpassing breast cancer. Part of the reason for young women smoking more is their mistaken belief that it can be used to control their weight.

Two studies in Canada and the United States indicated that most smokers start before the age of 20. According to a 1994 Health Canada study, smoking will be responsible for premature death (that is, death before the age of 70) in 55 per cent of young men and 51 per cent of young women now aged 15 if they continue to smoke.

"It's the number one preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the entire population," said Mahood. "There's nothing else out there that is going to kill one out of every two users."

There is no data available on why Aboriginal people are more prone to smoking but some studies have shown a correlation between poverty, high unemployment, low income and high rates of smoking. Poverty is definitely a problem on most reserves in Canada, and is a problem for most off-reserve Aboriginal people as well.

There are several anti-smoking and non-smoking organizations and health groups that are trying to educate people about the dangers of tobacco. But it's tough convincing Aboriginal people about the dangers of tobacco when they see it as a sacred plant necessary for traditional ceremonies.

The Traditional Native American Tobacco Seed Bank and Education Program at the University of New Mexico is making an attempt to maintain the traditional-ceremonial use of tobacco while educating people about the dangers of its misuse.

Joseph Winter runs the program, cultivates seeds and plants of traditional tobacco and distributes them free to Aboriginal people, tribes and organizations that need them for sacred ceremonies. He also issues a pamphlet that outlines the proper use of tobacco. It states: Under no circumstances should you smoke, chew, or otherwise ingest tobacco, for non-traditional so-called "pleasure." This applies to Native Americans as well as non-Native Americans.

The Pauktuutit Inuit Women's Association started a non-smoking campaign called Breathing Easy. According to statistics the organization has compiled, 30 per cent of Nunavik (northern Quebec) deaths are caused by tobacco use.

Health Canada has outlined a 12-point action list to educate Aboriginal people about tobacco use, based on the World Health Organization plan for tobacco control.
There is a reason for concern. If 50 per cent of smokers die prematurely, and about 50 per cent of Aboriginal Canadians smoke, then 25 per cent of the total Aboriginal population is destined to die prematurely. But what does that mean in real numbers? The First Nations population in Canada is about 600,000. According to the statistics, about one-quarter of them, or 150,000 First Nations people, will die prematurely because of tobacco-related illnesses. The economic, social, cultural, political and health care consequences are staggering.



Saavy leaders learn to communicate through the press

By Paul Barnsley

Windspeaker Staff Writer

If you're a careful reader of the mainstream press, you can stitch together the types of stories that get national front page exposure and from them get an idea of what a typical daily newspaper editor believes are the essential issues in Aboriginal communities.

Stories about corruption, incompetence, secrecy and other equally unflattering scenarios on reserves or in Aboriginal organizations will always make their way into the newspapers.

Most people will tell you that those stories should get attention.

But what seems to be missing, many band council or tribal council officials will tell you, is any attempt to understand what's really going on beyond the initial sensation.

In Indian country there does seem to be an impression that the journalists have already made up their minds about Aboriginal people and their institutions. The way the mainstream press zeroes in on stories about financial mismanagement, alcoholism, family violence, nepotism, or welfare dependency indicates they've decided that Aboriginal people and their institutions are primitive and unsophisticated and in need of some help from the 'more advanced' majority.

Why else is it that every time there's a report of a band operating in a deficit or encountering budget problems that Reform Party members or prominent business-oriented think-tanks or other conservative establishment groups immediately pronounce that Aboriginal people are not ready for self government? And, more importantly, why would the mainstream press think nothing of reporting those people saying such things without examining what those comments represent?
Several years ago, when former CBS sports analyst Jimmy "the Greek" Snider decided to tell his large, national viewing audience that Black people weren't suited for a particular sport because of their genetic make-up, his broadcasting career ended soon afterwards. That's because he was spouting the kind of pure bigoted ignorance that forever labeled him as undeserving of a national audience. Is there any difference between Jimmy the Greek's comments and those of a government bureaucrat or politician who concludes that an entire race of people are not ready to govern themselves because of a few problems?

Aboriginal leaders say "no." They say similar problems exist in Ottawa or in provincial or local governments. They wonder why reporters aren't writing that people involved in non-Aboriginal governments aren't ready to govern themselves. Their budgets aren't balanced. There's evidence of corruption with the awarding of government contracts in their departments. Shouldn't their race be labeled as deficient as well?

Is there any difference between Jimmy the Greek's comments and Canadian news organizations repeating the comments about Aboriginal people not being ready for self government? Only the difference between black and white, Aboriginal people would say.

By reporting such stories without diving into investigating and exposing the racism inherent in the comments is to contribute to the racism and perpetuate it. When this is seen to be happening on a fairly regular basis, it creates a very high level of mistrust about the mainstream press for First Nations people.

As a result, when mainstream reporters come to call they are treated with suspicion and rarely given much co-operation. The reporters are only human. They resent the antagonism they're greeted with. This affects the approach they take to the story. The story is written in an antagonistic mood. That makes the relationship between the First Nation in question and the press just that much worse.

It becomes a counter-productive, even destructive cycle: the story creates more distrust which creates more antagonism which creates more negative coverage and even more resentment in the Aboriginal community.
So what's the answer? The press isn't going to go away.
There are actually a couple of possible answers. First, somebody has to point out the mainstream's mistakes and try to educate people to be more understanding of what it is like to be a member of a minority group in Canadian society. Second, more Aboriginal people have to be become participants in the communications media so that the mistakes are spotted before the stories make it to print or onto the airwaves. To this end, more Aboriginal people are working in the mainstream press and, at the same time, the Aboriginal press is growing and gaining credibility.

But as the Aboriginal press grows there are more problems to solve. Reserve communities are typically small and rural; the most populous reserve in the country has, at most ,9,000 residents. Newspapers and electronic media outlets operate on the same basis: the more people they reach the more advertising revenue they generate and the better the job they can afford to do and still be profitable.

Doing business in a small community means relatively low revenue and unsophisticated operations. The typical reserve newspaper is a weekly with a small staff. That staff is usually made up of inexperienced, entry level journalists who work with few of the advantages that daily papers have - things like libraries, electronic data bases, expensive resource material, even the time it takes to allow a reporter to spend a couple of days on one story and really explore it in depth. And reserve newspapers are still a relatively new phenomenon, especially independent papers that aren't propped up with band council funding.

The current generation of Aboriginal politicians can remember the days when their every move wasn't scrutinized by a critical press. That makes them resentful. Many still haven't adjusted.

Because regular reporting on band councils is a relatively new thing, media relations skills have only recently become important tools for a chief or band councillor. Some are better than others at handling the media or, to put it in a way that has a more positive connotation, some are more able to interact with the media without creating damaging misunderstandings. It's a skill to be able to tell a reporter your story without being misunderstood on some points. It takes very strong communication skills, especially when there is a cultural barrier between the reporter and the subject of the interview.

If both parties - the newsmakers and the reporters - want to overcome the cultural barrier and get accurate information out to the people, then both sides should be ready to work at it. Many Aboriginal politicians resent the time they have to spend with the media. Many just don't bother returning phone calls or providing the information that reporters request.

In the mainstream, politicians have been dealing with the press for a long time and there are long-standing traditions and protocols that govern the way the two work together. Thoughtless mainstream reporters assume that Aboriginal politicians know these unwritten rules and have agreed to follow them as a condition of running for office. Therefore, a call not returned or an information request denied, in the reporter's mind, automatically signals a cover-up or an intentional evasion. A simple unreturned phone call can cause suspicion and antagonism.

Mainstream reporters and editors like to talk about fairness. To them, fairness is about treating everybody the same. However, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the law of the land guarantees a special status for Aboriginal people. As many judges have written in the last several years, Aboriginal people were here first, they have special rights. That bothers some decision-makers in newsrooms in this country.

For example, during a conference at Montreal's McGill University earlier this year, Andrew Coyne, one of the most respected columnists in Canada, became embroiled in a now famous battle with former national chief Ovide Mercredi over just that subject and it was clear that Coyne, an intelligent, thoughtful, well-informed voice for the establishment, was never going to see why it has to be that way for Aboriginal people.

Coyne argued that it was time for Aboriginal people to give up their special rights and become nothing more or less than regular everyday Canadians. He argued that basic human rights are universal and should apply to everyone equally. Mercredi angrily countered that Coyne was asking for assimilation. He was asking Aboriginal people to forget about the past, forget about that world that was theirs in the days before European contact.
Mercredi said it was sheer arrogance for a white European to say 'All people should be the same and they should all be like me.'

Boiled down to its crudest form, Coyne was saying 'Why can't you Indians act like regular people?'

Mercredi's answer was: 'As far as we're concerned we do and we're NOT going to change. If we haven't given up our culture and heritage despite all you've done to wipe us off the face of the earth, do you really think we ever will?'

Aboriginal people and those of European descent each have a fundamentally different way of looking at the world. The mainstream would like everybody to be the same and Aboriginal people are saying 'no way!'

Understanding that fundamental difference is the biggest gap that needs to be crossed to ensure good press relations for First Nations people. Some First Nations have decided to tackle that chore, to meet the press half-way and give themselves a sporting chance at having their point of view relayed to the average Canadian who reads the paper and watches television news.

In particular, several British Columbia First Nations have distinguished themselves for their media savvy. The Cheslatta have waged a long and determined fight to gain compensation for lands that were flooded in the 1950s to make way for Alcan Aluminum's Kemano Project. They've had a long time to learn how to avoid the pitfalls of the public eye and they've had some notable victories.

When there's an important bargaining session of the Nisga'a agreement-in-principle coming up, the Nisga'a public relations people get into gear. The press is informed before the fact, the background is provided, access to knowledgeable spokespeople is facilitated. Likewise with the Wet'suwet'en and Gitxsan people. During the long years when their Delgamuuk land claim case has slowly climbed the judicial ladder the First Nations have learned how to make their point with the press.

At the same time, there are occasional cases where a band council tries to ban the press. The Consolidated Regulations of Canada say that regular band council meetings must be open to the public. Some councils have decided that only general meetings are 'regular' meetings, and committee meetings can be closed. That gives councils the option to do a majority of their business in closed session, something that the membership and the press feel can lead to corruption.

In late summer of 1997, beginning at the Stoney Reserve in Alberta and spreading to other communities in the province, dissident groups began to demand more accountability from their chiefs and councils. The Stoney case began when a provincial court judge ordered an inquiry into the band's finances. The province and Indian Affairs both objected to the judge's decision. But members say that only the band council establishment is benefiting from the band's oil wealth.

Close observers of band council politics have long noted that nepotism and political influence in the awarding of government contracts at the local level are rampant in many First Nations. Most observers, not just journalists, believe that sunshine is the best disinfectant, that openness is the only way to avoid these pitfalls.

When a group of people who had been central in the call for more accountability on the Stoney Reserve travelled to Ottawa they were not welcomed by government officials who, one might think, would be anxious to address their concerns. Instead, they complained that they were given the 'run-around.'

Many Aboriginal observers, who have lived their entire lives under the Indian Act, and have learned how the system really works, believe the federal government doesn't want the true extent of band council mismanagement and lack of accountability to ever be exposed. The observers say that Indian Affairs has created the mess and it's not in their best interest to ever find out just how extensive that mess might be or who's really responsible. They say the band council system is not all that different from the Canadian system, a system which is not nearly as open as the average Canadian believes.

Any journalist who has ever tried to discover what the Cabinet is doing during their meetings or what transpires when the powerful Bureau of Internal Economy (the all-party committee which sets the working budget for the House of Commons) meets, will agree - some of the most important work done by the people's representatives in Canada is never revealed to the people.

The press has a huge responsibility. Reporters must keep shining the light on those who do the people's work to ensure that all the people are represented. Politicians and bureaucrats frequently feel that the press makes their job harder. That might be true but the unrest and controversy that continues to haunt band politics is a sure sign that only openness will leave the people feeling secure they are being treated fairly.

That's a lesson that all public servants - Aboriginal or otherwise - will learn as they continue in their careers. If they're smart they'll choose to learn it the easy way.



The Indian Act - Serious Internal Error: Discontinue use

By Paul Barnsley

Windspeaker Staff Writer

Compared to timeless works like the Magna Carta, the United States Constitution or the Iroquois Confederacy's Great Law of Peace, the Indian Act isn't much. But for the 600-odd band councils in Canada, it's the alpha and omega of day-to-day life.

The original Indian Act was written in the last century at a time when Aboriginal people were still being hunted for sport by colonial powers. That's not news, it's documented fact. European settlers found the Indigenous peoples' presence and claim on the lands and resources of the New World to be a problem that could be treated like a gopher infestation. That attitude is clearly present, especially in the earliest versions of the act.

The Indian Act was last given a major overhaul in the 1950s. In those days, Aboriginal people in Canada were risking criminal conviction if they attempted to hire lawyers to represent their interests; Aboriginal veterans were fine enough to serve in the Canadian army during the Second World War, but they couldn't have a drink with their comrades when they returned home because of race barriers that rivaled anything that the southern United States of South Africa had on offer. The act was modernized to reflect an only slightly more benevolent approach than the one of 'Great White Father' paternalism or the ruthless Conquistador mentality of the original framers. Yet the aim of the legislators in the 1950s still appeared to be condescendingly geared toward ending all cultural, legal and political distinctions between themselves and Aboriginal people.

If you read between the lines, it's very easy to see that the Indian Act was passed and amended by the Parliament of Canada to serve as an interim law that would deal with the 'Indian problem' for the time it took the government and its bureaucracy to find a permanent solution to that problem - total assimilation.

Assimilation has always been on the table. Traditional people say that band councils were established (frequently at the point of a gun) to let Aboriginal people preside over their own destruction. When you look at it from that point of view, it appears to be a chillingly malevolent move for a government to make, especially one for a country with a reputation as a liberal democracy that values human rights.

In many First Nation communities there is a serious split between those who have embraced the Indian Act system and those who have not. That is a very painful division that does great harm to these communities. It doesn't get as much attention as the harm done by the residential school system and other attempts by the churches and governments to convert Aboriginal people into Euro-Canadians, but the harm done by the loss of traditional Aboriginal self government systems is every bit as harmful. Bitterness and suspicion poison all dealings between the two sides. The traditional people call the band council supporters sell-outs and traitors. The band council supporters are outraged by such serious attacks. They are frozen between where they'd like to be (serving their people with honor in the traditional way as they believe their pre-contact leaders did) and where they feel they must be (functioning in a modern world in the best possible way.)

The average reserve community has a population of a few hundred people. The band council performs a similar function to that of a municipal government for those people but there are crucial differences between the two political systems.

Because band councils don't rely on the taxation of their people to pay for services, the money comes from the federal treasury. The tax-exempt status of Aboriginal people has its roots in agreements between the European settlers and the original inhabitants of what is now Canada. Land was made available to the newcomers in exchange for a guarantee that Indigenous people would never have to submit to the Crown's taxation. In most cases, the Aboriginal leaders of the time saw themselves to be representing separate nations; they were allies, not subjects, of the Crown. Somehow, through the course of westward expansion and settlement, the settlers assumed political control over all the lands and people. That control was frequently obtained by force.

The Royal Proclamation of 1763 spelled out exactly how land could be acquired from the Indigenous population in British North America. The British king wanted his representatives in North America to uphold the honor of the Crown by dealing fairly and openly with the Indigenous peoples. That high water mark in the behavior of the colonizing powers has left an expensive legacy for modern governments.

One of the biggest, if not the most obvious, sub-texts of life in Indian country - especially in the deficit cutting mania of the 1990s - has been the federal government's attempts to minimize the cost of keeping legitimate and legally binding promises made by their predecessors to the ancestors of Aboriginal people.

In the federal election of 1994, the soon-to-be-elected Liberal Party of Canada pledged to support the inherent right of Aboriginal people to govern themselves. It looked like a huge stride forward. It appeared that the federal government was prepared to make a radical departure from the assimilation policies of previous administrations. Subsequently, when then-Indian Affairs Minister Ron Irwin introduced his department's plan to implement self government, the plan was not particularly well-received by Aboriginal leaders. The self government plan put forward by the federal government did not recognize the power to govern was inherent. It delegated power from Ottawa to the First Nations and it was a very subordinate power, certainly not a recognition of sovereign First Nation governments. The federal government, even under a minister as progressive as Irwin, showed the world that it had no intention of sharing any of the real power that it possesses.

The philisophical problems of the Indian Act are only the beginning of the many problems facing Aboriginal governments. A band council or tribal council with an annual budget of $40 to 50 million dollars (Saskatchewan's Meadow Lake Tribal Council and Ontario's Six Nations are both in that range) has a complex job to do as it goes about providing services for its membership. It's a job that is on the same scale as that faced by a good-sized town council.

But unlike in a municipal government's budget, there is no money in the Indian Affairs budget for a full-time planner or legal department or other professional supports. As the population in First Nations grows (and the Aboriginal population is growing at a faster rate than the overall population) the pressures on band councils will grow accordingly.

Robert Manuel, a former chief of British Columbia's Neskonlith band who ran unsuccessfully for national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, has seen the pressure and complexity of the job of chief or councillor grow during his quarter-century in politics. He believes the Assembly of First Nations must become a counter-bureaucracy that can handle the complex political manouvering that is required so bands can hold their own when faced with government policies that are contrary to the best interests of band members. That's only because there is no money for each band council government to set up their own collection of skilled help.
Aboriginal people in Canada watched closely as the United States handed over authority to American tribes many years ago. The Aboriginal people south of the border took over budgets and authority for many things that the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs had looked after for many years. The mistake that the American tribes made was in not figuring in the cost of legal and professional services that were provided to the bureau by other branches of the government. Those support systems were expensive and were not part of the budgets the tribes took control of. The extra cost soon had the tribal governments in over their heads. In many cases they were forced to sell off their precious land base to survive. This led to the infamous checker-board reservations where land reserved for the tribe was dotted with plots that had been sold off to non-Aboriginal owners in order to raise money.

Traditional leaders believe it was yet another attempt to finish them off. First Nations began with the entire North American continent. Within a couple of hundred years, their population decimated by disease and the Indian wars, they were reduced to living on tiny patches of land, land that was almost always the least valuable, least attractive real estate. It seems quite reasonable that some Aboriginal people are suspicious of every move that the non-Aboriginal governments make.

History suggests they'd be fools not to be.

But the continued growth of the Aboriginal community and its unwavering determination to preserve its culture and traditions, no matter what, suggests that there's going to have to be a major change in the way the game is played.

That change will take one of two forms: a mutually acceptable replacement for the Indian Act that includes a reasonable settlement of land claims; or Canada will have to finally give up all pretense of trying to deal fairly with Indigenous people.



Aboriginal language - When it's gone, that's it. No more Indians

By Rob McKinley

Windspeaker Staff Writer

Museums and cultural centres preserve a people's history. The artifacts and memories can be seen through display cases or in photographs, but what about a language?

Who preserves a culture's language?

Historically, Aboriginal language has been passed down from one generation to the next. It is an oral relay from a community's Elders to the youth. So what happens if the flow is disturbed? What happens if a single generation fails to pass on the wisdom of the Elders?

According to a report compiled in 1990 by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Aboriginal People, 43 of Canada's 53 Native languages are "on the verge of extinction." Ten more are described as threatened. Only three: Cree, Ojibway and Inuktitut were believed to be strong enough to survive.
Joe Chosa, an Elder with the Lac du Flambeau Ojibway Tribe in Wisconsin, is one of three people taking on the task of teaching the local dialect of the Ojibway language to the people there.
Chosa said teaching a language is more than just words.
"We are trying to teach them to be proud of who they are and proud of their heritage, proud of the things that we do."

He said it is a slow process for several reasons. The Ojibway language is complex, consisting of a number of words that are very similar, but mean very different things. Another reason is that the language has been nearly wiped out after years of attempted assimilation.
"The culture was taken away from us during the boarding school days and from. . . religion. We'd like to bring the language back to our people," Chosa said.
The language classes are getting a good reception from the community, Chosa said, but more can be done.

Local schools are now offering Ojibway language classes. Grade 1 to 8 students in the Lac du Flambeau area are now being taught the language.

Gregg Guthrie, the acting director at the George W. Brown Jr. Ojibway Museum and Cultural Centre in Lac du Flambeau is one of the big supporters of the language revitalization.

Although the Ojibway language is one of the stronger Aboriginal languages, the local dialect is in danger of disappearing, said Guthrie.
He compared the threat to that of endangered animals and birds.
"When its gone, its gone for ever."
He said the three Elders teaching now are just about the last of the 3,000 tribal members who still know the language and the customs of their people.
In order to boost the number of people speaking their language, Guthrie said the Elders have recorded audio tapes. The tapes and classroom lessons are available to anyone who is interested, he said.

The tapes will help to spread the teachings on a wider scale.

"Before that there were only individuals talking in the homes. Now it's a matter of public access," he said.
Aboriginal language classes are becoming more and more of a common site across the continent.

In Canada, public school boards are now offering Native language classes in many schools. First Nation schools are also realizing the need to begin traditional language instruction.

The Chief Taylor Elementary School in Onion Lake, Sask., is taking the learning a step further. The school is teaching Cree immersion. Songs, books, pictures and lessons are all taught in the Plains Cree dialect. The students stay in the immersion program from nursery school to Grade 3. They then switch to a combination of Cree and English instruction.

"If the teachers can talk to them in Cree and the parents reinforce it at home, then the language becomes a natural, living part of their lives," said Brian MacDonald, head of the Cree curriculum development team at Onion Lake's Saskatchewan Learning Centre.
Keeping a language alive and useful is paramount to its survival. One language that has survived and is expected to remain strong is Inuktitut.
Part of the reason for that is that the language has not been allowed to fade away. It is estimated that there are at least 60,000 Inuktitut speakers in Canada.
As Aboriginal immersion schools are not yet common across the country, neither are newspapers written in Native text.

Nunatsiaq News is the exception. The paper has been serving the eastern Arctic region of the country for over 20 years and prints stories in both English and Inuktitut.
In the mainstream papers, said Nunatsiaq News editor Dwane Wilkin, there are a few more which are bilingual with French and English printing, but none with Aboriginal and English words.

"For us it is the ability to reach readers who are uni-lingual - Inuktitut readers who only know Inuktitut."
Wilkin said he hopes the paper is helping to keep the language alive.

"It's a working language and if people don't use it, then it becomes a dead language."

The paper is helping to keep the language "vibrant and useful," he said.

Relying on the written words or recorded words instead of direct relay of a language from one generation to the next may be a benefit in the survival of a language. It is also opening up some economic benefits for Aboriginal people.
Joe Chalifoux is with the marketing wing of Duval House Publishing Inc. in Edmonton. Duval House has created a First Nation's language learning series made up of books, tapes and now CD's for school-aged children across the country.
"The response has been great, phenomenal," said Chalifoux. "We've been getting orders from across the country."
Duval House offers starter courses and intermediate courses in Cree, and starter courses in Ojibway, Dene and Swampy Cree, just to name a few.

The use of written and recorded teachings is very important in keeping a language alive, said Chalifoux.

"It is teaching more and preserving [the languages]," he said.

Alberta's Treaty 6, and in particular the Saddle Lake First Nation, helped to get the Cree learning series going, and the Samson Cree are currently working on getting a course ready for the publishing company to market.

Chalifoux said it is important for all First Nations to work together to help preserve the language and cultures of all Aboriginal people.

"We work with the Elders all the time. We make sure the Elders and the nations are involved."

Donna Peskemin is the new Cree language instructor at the University of Alberta Native Studies program. She sees the economic spin-off that the resurgence in the Aboriginal language is producing, and she also sees the need to keep the learning curve growing.

"We have to see our language not as a problem any more, but as a resource. I'm making a career out of my language."
Peskemin said to relearn your own language is a step toward the future that needs the lessons of the past to succeed.
"Now we have to return to the wisdom of our Elders to return to the language," she said.
She said all Aboriginal people need to work together to help the cause.
"We need to expand. We need to work together to promote our languages. . . We all need to come together and revive it and educate our Native youth."

Languages like Cree are moving in the right direction because most of the words are already in written form, she said.

"But a lot of other languages are disappearing. Elders who do have the wisdom are passing on so fast. We need to make the commitment and recognize the need now."

If nothing is done, it won't take long before even the Cree language will be gone, except for a few people who learned it.

"I don't want to be lonely in 15 years," she said.

Basil Johnston, a language instructor living in the Chippewas of Nawash [Cape Croker] First Nation, near Wiarton, Ont., said he has been trying to increase the use of Aboriginal language for 30 years.

Johnston, who has published several teaching guides on Native languages along with a thesaurus for schools, said teaching an Aboriginal language has to be handled very delicately.
"There are all sorts of new things being taught, but they aren't getting down and doing something that will re-kindle the language."
He said the language needs to be learned as it was spoken by traditional ancestors of the community.
Teaching needs to be more than just linguistics, he said. It has to include the spirit and heart of the words.
"Students would learn to speak the language rather than just memorize lists of words and their genders."
He recommended that people first get the truth about the heritage and history of the Aboriginal people, then attempt to learn the language.

Johnston, who's mother tongue is Anishinabe, said teachers must also learn the language they are teaching, and learn it well.

"It is not just the grammar, not just the basic words. You need to know the meaning of words and their history and you need to know all that if you are going to be an effective teacher," he said.

After 30 years of teaching and researching, Johnston said he does not feel that he has succeeded and to him, that is a disappointment.

Johnston said what is left is hope.

"The only thing we can do is to do the best we can and be satisfied with that. We have to hope that there are people out there who will learn the language."

It is up to the strength, power and determination of individuals to keep languages alive, he said.

"When it's gone, that's it. No more Indians," he said.

Plans are being developed

If changes are to come, action needs to take place. Relying on the people is one thing, but giving them a way to deal with the situation is another.

Heather Blair, an assistant professor at the University of Alberta Faculty of Education, said steps need to be taken on three levels to make sure a language will survive.

The community, schools and Elders need to promote the use of the mother language. On a larger scale, more support for Aboriginal languages needs to come from provincial and federal levels.

People, including non- Native people, also need to place more value on Aboriginal languages, she said.
Blair helped to spearhead a study in Saskatchewan this past May on the importance of keeping language strong.
Blair said it is difficult to determine when a language is in danger of being lost. It can sometimes just be in a state of change, but when a language is on the verge of disappearing, it happens all too quickly, she said. It is hoped the study she and a number of researchers conducted will wake up many communities to the importance of preserving their languages, and to show others the importance of Aboriginal languages in any society.

The intensive study, Indian Languages Policy and Planning in Saskatchewan: Research Report, looked at language and language education in six northern Saskatchewan communities. Within the 127-page document, there is a quote from the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations which reads:
We, the Indian people of Saskatchewan, are determined to retain our languages. We are oral people. The spoken word holds the key to our reality. Our Elders are the trustees, teachers, and interpreters of our complex heritage. We are determined to return to the source of our wisdom and to learn anew. We hear the Elder's words and are striving to understand. We are determined to give our children the opportunity to be involved in our unique world views, histories, legends, stories, humor, social rules, morality, and ways of seeing and describing our worlds. Our languages teach us these things. We cannot afford to lose them.

The study, available from Saskatchewan Education, contains action steps and recommendations for communities to follow as a way to preserve their languages.

A main goal noted in the study is for communities to organize action plans to keep language and language education strong. People can't just hope for change, we have to provide the means for change to happen.

"It is going to take time, effort and money. The task is enormous and urgent, but with comprehensive planning, commitment and serious work, some of these languages can be saved," noted Blair.

-END-

Issue #5

May 1998

Classroom Edition Issue 5 - May - front cover Windspeaker

Reflecting on the past:

Pop up residential schools

I must apologize for being Indian

Recommended readings

The Band Administrator

The more things change...

 

MAJOR SPONSORS:

Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc.
Cree School Board


CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS:
Ermineskin Education Authority
Makivik Corporation
Pepsi Cola Canada Ltd.
Royal Bank of Canada
Confederacy of Treaty Six
Paul Band Education

Pop up Residential Schools

priest illustration, residential school
Four churches were involved in the operation of residential schools for Indian children: the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of England (Anglican), the Methodist (United) Church, and the Presbyterian Church. These organizations were funded by the federal government,whose goal it was to assimilate Indian and Inuit people into mainstream society. The church-government partnership for Aboriginal education lasted from the 1840s to 1969, though the last residential school, Christie Roman Catholic school in Tofino, B.C. didn't close until 1983.

It's estimated that 100,000 to150,000 Aboriginal children attended residential schools.

The first residential school for Aboriginal children was set up in the 1840s in Alderville, Ont. By 1920, it became mandatory for all Indian children to attend school. the number of schools in operation peaked at 88.
Their education [that of Indian children] must consist not merely of the training of the mind, but of a weaning from the habits and feelings of their ancestors and the acquirement of the language, arts and customs of civilized life.*
To accomplish this goal, discipline was the answer in many missions. "Historians suggest that discipline was more harsh at residential schools than at other schools and would not have been accepted in Euro-Canadian institutions at the time. . . These methods included isolation cells, flogging and whipping, and humiliation."**
*From a federal government report published in 1847.
**From Residential School Update, AFN March 1998.


Mission Bean

A little boy I was, just lost my home
So the mission took me in, so I wouldn't roam
A hair cut, a bath, new shoes on my feet
Plaid shirt & coveralls, that was my beat
Up in the morning, fall down on my knees
Pray to the Lord the right way I see's
Off to school after porridge, lard and bread
Trying to pound math and Catechism in my head
Never too brilliant was I in school
But serving the Altar, I was no fool
Our Father which art in Heaven, Amen
I could 'cite that backwards - in Latin
Yes, a little boy, lost with no mom or dad
In the third year there, I became a "Wetbed"
They swatted my bum with a big black strap
The backside of me should be a horizontal crack
Yes, I would jump and jig and howl in pain
Then fly in a tub, hoping the Nun had right aim
Sometimes the tub's faucets would bang on my head
But that was the downfall of being a "Wetbed"
Now it's 5:30 a.m. and we're off to pray
Three times on Sunday, that was the way
The Nun like my mother, the Priest like my dad
With guardians like that, who could go bad
The mission was army, we walked two and two
Discipline was the order, what else could they do
Some missions were good, some were bad
Those who suffered, I feel real sad
I have words for those who dwell in self pity
That's not the answer, just say "tough titty"
The $350 million we got to cure decades of scars
The Vultures will get most of it to buy new cars
They'll travel all over, eat up the fund in time
The victims of missions will not see a dime
For those of us left, not yet in our coffin
These wise words, you will hear often
Lift your chin high and proudly walk on
Keep a smile on your face,
like the sun always shone.

- The Mad Trapper, (Fred Stevenson)
Kinuso, Alta.



Lac St Anne, blessing, lake, priest

The United Church of Canada was the first of the religious organizations to apologize for its treatment of Aboriginal children in residential schools. The apology was offered in 1986.

Many Aboriginal people have found great comfort from the religious teaching they acquired in the residential school system, as the thousands of Aboriginal people who attend the annual Lac Ste. Anne Pilgrimage in Alberta can attest. Not all residential schools were badly run. Some administrators encouraged staff to learn Native languages, allowed visits from parents and fought for more money for food and better shelter for the children.

Hundreds of lawsuits have been filed against the federal government with settlements ranging from $11,000 to $400,000. The most prominant criminal action was taken against former Port Alberni Residential School supervisor, Arthur Henry Plint. He was sentenced to 11 years in prison after pleading guilty to 16 counts of indecent assault.

Despite whatever good intentions the churches initially had, the residential school system as a whole had a tragic effect on Aboriginal people. Loss of language, traditional spirituality and culture was a result. In worse cases, children were physically, mentally or sexually abused. Generation after generation of children were denied parental love and attention during the most formative years of their lives.

Canada was not the only country that had residential schools. In Australia, thousands of Aboriginal children were also taken from their families and educated under similar circumstances. The Australian government refuses to apologize for its assimilation policies and has offered only $52 million as its "healing fund."


I must apologize for being an Indian

First and foremost, I must warn you, my apology will be curt. It will be as straight as an arrow. I must apologize for being an Indian.

I feel regret for the years of burden my kind has been to the Canadian public at large. As well, my apology is extended on behalf of my mother. She feels sorry for the years during which she tried to keep her language while attending a government-controlled residential school in northern Manitoba.

Words cannot describe the heart-felt regret that she feels; she is also sorry for being an Indian.

My mother was very fortunate. While attending residential school, she learned how to be dysfunctional... to a tee. On return to her reserve, she couldn't function. She hated being an Indian. She was surrounded by the people that she was taught to hate. She was surrounded by Indian men. While attending "Residential School 101" (her favorite class), my mother was taught the darndest thing . . . to hate them. Thank God for the fact that my mother was color blind. She might have realized that she was a brown-eyed girl.

Wow . . . the wonders of residential school. I must thank the residential school system, you programmed my mother well. She came home, well, in a metaphysical way. Her heart was gone. Luckily she had her body. Did you know that residential schools took one of the most important aspects of anyone's life? It took my mother's sense of family and warped it. The tie that binds, you could say.

If it wasn't for the residential school system, my mother might have had a relationship with her parents . . . you know that love thing. Phew, she didn't need that, the touch of a mother, the words of a father, the love of Mushom and Kokum. Poppycock, I say. It's all bullocks.
What did she need family for anyways? Did she need them for support? No, she had the memory of all the "Mothers," so to speak, hitting her while she was a child. That's all the support she needed.
I am so grateful for those assimilation programs, and let's not forget the religion. If it wasn't for Christianity, my mother might have passed on traditions that were, well, as old as God.
It's a fact. The language retains culture. It holds ancient lessons and sayings that were, fortunately, lost, but who needs Indian talk anyways? English will have to do. The "subtlety" of English has replaced the knowledge of many generations. Many heart-felt strikes of a ruler made sure that my mother lost the need to remember her language. For the love of God, my mother gave up everything that made her, that made her family and, ultimately, that made me.

So I say again, I must apologize for being an Indian.
I should be grateful that the state set up those wondrous situations. Through my mother, I can feel the beatings she endured. One hit for being an Indian. Another for that brown skin. Here's two for that dirty "unwhite" language. And, last but not least, one big stick for remembering that smelly Indian family of yours. I am very sorry for not loving you, my mother, for not respecting you . . . too bad you had such great teachings.

My mother, I can promise you this: Your grandchildren will be loved. Your grandchildren will never be sent away. Your grandchildren will be proud of their Anishnawbe heritage. Your grandchildren will not be institutionalized. And finally, mother, I forgive you.

- Jarrod Miller


Books on residential schools

No End of Grief: Indian Residential Schools in Canada
Dr. Agnes Grant
Pemmican Publications Inc.


Book, residential school, no end to grief

The book documents with disarming intensity the incredible betrayal of the Aboriginal people in this country, who had trusted the Canadian government to deliver the quality education promised in treaties.

The head-on collision between the civilizing forces of Christianity and the natural, holistic and established ways of ancient and complex cultures was to have devastating and long-term effects which are still felt today.

The suffering caused by the separation from parents, loss of language and repression of traditional ways and beliefs left several generations of Aboriginal children lost in a land of humiliation, bewilderment and alienation.

One of the most poignant and symbolic memories described by some of the survivors was the devastating loss of their long hair and braids, an important part of the ritual imposed by the nuns and priests to strip "the pagan and savage" identities from their little charges. Cutting off hair, explains Grant, is a key part of cross-cultural domination around the world.

Grant provides an honest and credible account of an era that many would probably like to forget or see swept under the carpet. But healing, she said, must begin with acknowledgment, not denial.

Generations of Aboriginal people still live with painful memories of residential schools. They are trying to deal with these memories and forgive the perpetrators, but are unable to forget.

"They ask only," writes Grant, "that justice be done in our time as they seek resources to restore the balance that was forcibly shattered by ruthless domination, human incompetence, Christian over-zealousness and government indifference."


Stolen From Our Embrace
 By Suzanne Fournier and Ernie Crey

Douglas & McIntyre

 

 

Book, residential school, stolen from our embrace

Stolen From Our Embrace is a joint effort by journalist Suzanne Fournier and Native activist and Sto:lo Fisheries manager Ernie Crey.

 

Through first-person accounts, they examine how First Nations children were forced into residential schools, foster homes and non-Native adoptions in foreign countries.

Fournier examines the causes of some of the most prevalent problems facing today's First Nations children and their communities, tracing drug, alcohol and sexual abuse back to the government imposed systems that led to the loss of culture, family and self.

 


"As a child, I was forcibly removed from Sto:lo culture by social welfare authorities," wrote Ernie Crey. "Our family life was shattered after seven of my eight siblings and I were split apart into separate foster homes. We were never again to be reunited as a family," writes Crey.

 

Crey tells of being bounced around to various non-Native foster homes, many of which were operated by pedophiles and overzealous disciplinarians.

"I had seen my father's spirit dimmed by the residential school where his culture was choked out of him, so that all his life he held his Halq'emeylem language and spiritual knowledge in check, depriving us, his children, of our most precious birthright," he said.

 


Stolen From Our Embrace is a eye-opening book for non-Native people who wish to learn more about their government's attempts at cultural genocide, or for Native people who wish to compare their own stories with the stories of others.

 


Shingwauk's Vision:
A History of Native Residential Schools
By James R. Miller
University of Toronto Press

 

Book, residential school, shingwauk's vision

Ojibwa Chief Shingwauk of the Garden River community near Sault Ste. Marie sought academic learning and instruction in skills that young people could use to maintain themselves and future generations. Shingwauk traveled to see the King's representative and extended an invitation that would prove to have a profound and unseen effect on Native people for generations to follow.

 

Native people quickly became disillusioned with the teaching practices of the European world. Very quickly, Aboriginal leaders found that residential schools were not what they had sought. Their attempts to stop the oppression of their culture would have little effect for more than a century.

 


Shingwauk's Vision provides a historical overview of the residential schools to which status Indian children were sent. Residential schools, which were authorized by the federal government and operated by several Christian missionary bodies, were designed to Christianize, assimilate and train Native children for economic self sufficiency. Their failure to provide successful academic and vocational training, in addition to their mistreatment of children, provoked opposition that contributed to their ultimate demise in the 1960s.

Shingwauk's Vision provides the first comprehensive historical treatment of this exercise in attempted social engineering.

James R. Miller's findings are based on more than a decade's research of government, denominational and Native sources. Of particular importance to the book are the interviews and personal testimonies of survivors.

 



 

The Band administrator: A one person bureaucracy
By Paul Barnsley
Windspeaker Staff Writer

Cartoon, Kew, Band Administration, juggling responsibilities

 

Politicians get a lot of attention in the press. But the task of making a government function after the politicians have made the decisions is left to the bureaucracy.
#In Ottawa, as in all seats of federal power, tens of thousands of people conduct the business of government, each performing a carefully defined duty with a carefully defined reporting routine. Each is highly-trained to perform the assigned function. Likewise, provincial and municipal governments are big employers.
But in First Nations, where populations range from a couple of hundred people to several thousand, it's different.


Cartoon, Kew, Band Administration, how to book

There are no budgets, or enabling clauses that would allow the creation of budgets, provided in the federal legislation - the Indian Act - which would pay for an army of administrators and functionaries who could work in support of a First Nation government. You won't see a legal department or a planning department or a public relations department on a reserve, because there is no established annual budget for such fundamentally important parts of a legitimate government's job.
Without money to hire trained people to fulfill such difficult but important functions, the complicated task of over-seeing the various programs and departments falls on one person - the band administrator.

The band administrator has to be fully fluent in all provincial and federal legislation which affects funding sources for First Nations. He or she has to keep the band council from getting itself into legal or financial hot water. His or her job is to know the pitfalls of several very complicated and varied bureaucratic systems and be able to instantly spot a serious flaw in a council's decision. Whether it be federal housing or provincial social services legislation and policy, or any other of an astonishing number of areas of responsibility, the band administrator must be able to advise the elected council so they can make the right decisions. And, of course, the administrator is the natural scape-goat if things go wrong.

Relying on one person to juggle so much important information and to be responsible for so much can create its own set of problems for a chief and band council. Because the administrator is usually more educated than his or her political masters, (they hire an administrator for his or her expertise because they need it) it's not uncommon for the chief to become little more than a figurehead. The bureaucrat, the person with the knowledge, gets the power that was given by the voters to the politician. Although more and more Aboriginal people are getting into the field, it's frequently non-Aboriginal people who end up as band administrators.

Bill Wilson, a veteran British Columbia Aboriginal politician and traditional chief, believes it's not good for non-Aboriginal people to be in such powerful positions in First Nations governments, because European and Aboriginal cultures are so foreign to each other. But Wilson also sees it as inevitable because the band council system is a creation of the Indian Act which is a non-Aboriginal creation.

"Indian Affairs sets it up for failure," Wilson said. "There's no support system provided and no money to create your own."

Wilson believes that the answer is to get back to traditional methods of governance. In the traditional systems, he said, positions of political leadership were seen as an awesome responsibility. Leaders, although their positions were (and are) hereditary, had to spend the first 30 years or more of their lives proving to their community that they were fit to lead. That system is far superior to a democratic vote, Wilson said, because the process of choosing a leader does not degenerate into a popularity contest.

In the political system imposed under the Indian Act, (many First Nations people believe) positions of political leadership are seen as positions of power and personal prestige, not necessarily as responsibilities. They see their chiefs and councillors wielding authority without much attempt at - or taste for - accountability. Indian Affairs Minister Jane Stewart recently told reporters she spent a good part of the month of October 1997 telling chiefs that accountability and transparency is now a must. She also revealed that many chiefs vehemently protested her department's new accountability procedures. That suggests accountability and transparency have been sadly lacking in First Nation governments up to now, that in many cases the people who protested against the common practices of their band councils had legitimate grievances.

In early April of this year, the Assembly of First Nations seems to have admitted as much by reaching out to the Certified General Accountants Association of Canada for assistance in developing First Nation-specific accounting practices.

Reform Party Indian Affairs critic, Mike Scott, says he has 50 files, each involving a First Nation whose members have complaints about their council's accountability, files that he is actively following. He blames the system and the federal government for a lot of the problems.

Westbank Indian Band member Ray Derrickson said that the lack of a funded official Opposition in First Nations leads to abuses. He closely follows developments in his own British Columbia interior community, and he bemoans the lack of financial resources available to make his job easier.

"There's no opposition that's paid for," he said. "How do I go to work on this and put food on the table for my family when there's no money? That lack of funding within the system effectively controls any opposition."

Many people with an intimate knowledge of band politics and operations say the lack of accountability comes as much from fuzzy lines of communication and organization - things that aren't spelled out in any detail in the Indian Act - as it does from any overt act of corruption. Without well defined rules of behavior and universally understood and accepted methods of communication, mistakes are bound to happen.

Those mistakes can be costly and embarrassing. The stereotype of the Aboriginal person who is too simple, unsophisticated and lacking in the complex skills needed to run a government is fed by the inadequate system, some band councillors say. But when those mistakes in communication occur, the stereotype is also ina the minds of the councillors involved and the fear of embarrassment often causes cover-ups. Aboriginal people involved might even buy into the stereotype and believe they aren't as capable as white bureaucrats, Bill Wilson said.

Former Six Nations of the Grand River band councillor Dave Johns was elected to a two year term in late 1993, despite the fact he is a Mohawk nat- ionalist with no sympathy for the band council system.

He immediately became a thorn in the side of elected Chief Steve Williams and his council. Johns insisted on a level of openness and accountability that was unprecedented in his community.

His close-up look at the system has left him with the impression that the shallowness and unsophisticated nature of the governments created by the Indian Act was no accident.

"I don't think the plan was for us to be around in the 21st century or even the middle of this century," he said. "We were all supposed to be assimilated by then. I've read Indian Affairs documents that talked about the Indian problem in the body politic and what could be done to eliminate it. That Indian Act was supposed to be a temporary thing that would only be around long enough for them to get rid of us."

In any band council or tribal council of any size, Saskatchewan's Meadow Lake Tribal Council or the Six Nations of the Grand River First Nation in Ontario have total annual budgets that are close to $50 million, the job of the band administrator is immense. In a typical band administration there are between 10 and 20 departments.

Unlike a municipal government, which is similar in size and in scope of responsibility, the program dollars are budgeted to cover the program only. Also unlike a municipal government, a band council can't raise its own revenue through taxation. That means control of the cash flow is exercised by the funding sources.

That has meant that the administrators who actually do the work may be able to see where it would be wise to deviate from a program, but they don't have the authority to do so. That can be extremely stressful; if you have to tell people that you can't help them when your job is to help them, you can be sure that each workday will be long and unpleasant. Burn-out and other long-term disabilities are not uncommon among band council employees, something that drives up the cost of administering the programs and further erodes the amount of money that actually gets used to help the people the program was intended to help.

Once the cash arrives at the First Nation, it makes its way to the department which is responsible for seeing that it is used as the funder intended (In theory, anyway. Councils frequently use money destined for one purpose for another purpose either out of necessity or as a gesture of independence.) Each department head looks after his or her department and then reports to the band administrator, the one person who must monitor the performance of the department heads and make sure they are keeping their staff members in line and providing an acceptable level of productivity in exchange for their wages.

One would think the administrator would always be a powerful person able to command the respect and obedience of the senior managers - he or she is their boss, after all. But the reality is the politicians are the bosses and their most important consideration is to get re-elected. They hate saying "no" to anyone because that costs votes. Council jobs and contracts are used as political capital on reserves. Politicians create support by handing out jobs and other favors to those who supported them in the last election. Just as in one common scenario is that the administrator assumes too much power because he or she has control of all the important information, in another scenario, it's not unusual for a capable administrator to be handcuffed by the politicians.

Indian Affairs Minister Stewart said she is willing to work in partnership with First Nations, but the federal government is only willing to deal with and recognize band councils. Across Canada, the push for a return to traditional government forms may create problems for the federal government even as it attempts to modify the existing band council system. Recognition of the inherent right to self government and a more respectful approach to First Nations by the federal government may be coming too little, too late to save the Indian Act system.

Question 1:
Can a nation govern itself without taxation? How?

Question 2:
Can Canada exist with sovereign First Nations located within its borders?

Question 3:
Is the Department of Indian Affairs ultimately to blame for corruption on reserves?

Question 4:
What ideas can you come up with to improve First Nations governments?

 

 



 

The more things change. . .

According to Canada's most recent statistics, the mean income of Aboriginal people aged 15 and above was just $14,700, or 61 per cent of the non-Aboriginal average.
Aboriginal unemployment was 24.6 per cent, as compared to a Canadian average of about 10 per cent. The unemployment gap continues to broaden over time.
Aboriginal people 15 years of age and over continue to have much lower levels of schooling than the non-Aboriginal populations, regardless of age group. More than one-half (54 per cent) of the Aboriginal population 15 and over had not received a high school diploma, compared with 35 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population.

Beginning in late November 1997, and continuing into early February, 63 Quesnel area children were taken from their families and placed in the care of social services. As many as 23 of those children were Aboriginal.

An Aboriginal woman and her eight year old son residing at the Tsuu T'ina First Nation near Calgary were shot dead by RCMP who were assisting a social worker who was trying to take the woman's children. The woman armed herself with a rifle, fired at authorities, and one constable fired back. The bullet went through the woman, killing the son who was standing behind her. People close to the slain woman said a family member should have been called in to intercede.


It will be late summer before the Supreme Court of Canada decides if goods purchased off reserve but intended for consumption on reserve are subject to provincial sales tax.

The federal government, in a move that law professors all over the country say is a violation of its fiduciary obligation to protect Aboriginal rights, argued that such purchases should be subject to taxation, despite the provisions of Section 87 of the Indian Act. Should the court decide the purchases are taxable, some Aboriginal leaders are contemplating asking the court to rehear the case because the issue of the federal government's fiduciary obligation was not raised during the appeal.
Many say political considerations lead the government to ignore its legal obligation.

 

-END-

 

Confidential

Windspeaker Confidential

Windspeaker Confidential talks to the up and comers in Indian Country and asks them the questions that we would if we had the chance.

 

Confidential: Aaron Paquette

Aaron Paquette


July-2008

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Aaron Paquette: A tough one right off the bat!  All the good answers are honesty, loyalty, that kind of thing, but if someone’s your friend, hopefully they already have that in spades.  I think I’d have to say the ability to sit with you in silence, neither one feeling forced to break the awkward moment because the moment isn’t awkward at all!  It’s just you and an old friend sitting there. Well, now that I put it that way it sounds kind of boring...

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

A.P.: People throwing their trash out the window of their car.  Who do they think is going to clean it up anyway?  Me?  They’re probably right, but that’s a little presumptuous on their part, don’t you think?  Seriously, though, it really bothers me.  It speaks of a complete absence of gratitude for the earth we live on and share.  I can’t really blame anyone, because who do you blame?  In the end everyone does the best they can with what they’ve got at the moment.  If you don’t have gratitude, it’s because no one gave that gift to you, or if they did you didn’t understand it.  I guess it’s why we have a whole lifetime to learn it.

 

W: When are you at your happiest?

A.P.: I should probably say that it’s when I’m painting, but really it’s when I’m with my family.  There’s just something special about being able to tell old stories and love them every time, and to be able to take tragedy and turn it into laughter.  Even though your family can make you go crazy sometimes, getting through it is healing and it’s when I learn the most.

 

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

A.P.: Hopeless

 

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

A.P.: Myself.  My humility.  Ha ha, just kidding.  It’s got to be my mom, for giving it her best every day of our lives.  They don’t give awards for that, but they sure as heck should.

 

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

A.P.: Getting to the point where I knew what it really meant to let go.  Once I finally reached that, actually letting go was the easy part.

 

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

A.P.: Being a father.  I don’t just mean “making a baby”.  Any fool can do that.  I mean actually sticking around, being a part of my kids lives.  Being clean, strong, and patient - all the things I needed and all kids need from their dads.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m far from perfect, but for my children I try to be a better man every day.

 

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

A.P.: Are any goals really out of reach? We walk from moment to moment, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly, but eventually we get to where we were going, even if it means finding out that what we thought we really wanted wasn’t all that important after all!  We can achieve anything but what’s really cool is learning what we should be trying to achieve.

 

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

A.P.: Something else! What I mean is, in the end I’ve found it doesn’t really matter as long as you love it.  I’ve been in deep pits shoveling fish guts and found the fun in it.  I’ve cleaned up messes, served drinks, stocked shelves in the middle of the night, shaped gold, cut glass, planted trees and so on – and even though every job I’ve had was hard, it was losing myself in the work that took the work out of it, you know?  There’s something fascinating in everything we do, we just have to find it.

 

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

A.P.: Be quiet.  Speak up. My dad always taught me to just be quiet and listen.  Let someone say everything they need to say.  And then still be quiet!  The other person may have more to share if you give them a chance. 

It’s the only way you’ll ever know what’s important to them.  My mom always taught me to speak up, to stand up for myself.  Not to shout or get angry, but to just be firm, speak plainly, simply and then see what happens.

 

W: Did you take it?

A.P.: Eventually.

 

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

A.P.: Well, if anyone remembers me at all, I hope it’s because I made their life happier.  The sad thing is I know I’ve hurt people along the way – so when I’m gone, they might hold on to those pains I’ve caused and it will make them unhappy. 

If I could track them all down and make it right, I would, but I can’t.  So what do you do? 

I guess try to be a force for good in this world, so good that it spreads out and touches the lives of the people you might have wronged and that it makes things a little brighter for them - and everyone else.  They may never know that the happiness spread out from your good actions, and they never have to!  All that matters is you did good in your life.  Enough good that it passed beyond yourself. So I hope to be remembered not for myself, but for the happiness I added to this world. That would be mighty fine.

 

Aaron Paquette, 34, is a deep-thinking Edmonton artist who avoids “angst” in his paintings, preferring to portray crow tricksters wearing bone breastplates and top hats, and beautiful, earthy women with gold light glowing around their heads.

“I’m not trying to make them look like saints,” he explains. “I’m expressing my awe and respect for the sacred beings they are.”

He began his artistic career as a stained glass artisan and gold smith, the influence reflected in his trademark bold, black outlines around his subjects and  meticulous attention to small details.

Aaron is currently showing a new body of work at Edmonton’s Bearclaw Gallery.

Confidential: Crystal Favel

Crystal Favel

Crystal Favel

December - 2008

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Crystal Favel: I value my husband’s commitment to make my heart beat with harmony, hope and inspiration.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

C.F.: When community members call me names and try to bully me for being different. It also hurts when you trust someone with your story/ music and they betray you with ulterior motives.  Does honour not have its place in this world anymore?

W: When are you at your happiest?

C.F.: I love to visit the mountain I was born on; it grounds me. It takes me from my lowest feeling to my highest inspiration. I especially love speaking from the heart, it opens so many doors for me. I feel like I could reach out to the world.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

C.F.: I am very tearful when I’m triggered by my past.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

C.F.: I admire my business partner because there isn’t one skill we don’t cover as a team.  He pushes me to push my limits and I love that. 

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

C.F.: Blazing trails is the most difficult thing I’ve done because by the time I’ve broken down barriers, I’m usually licking my wounds at the same time. It’s bittersweet. I have also had to give up “the fight” to save my own life.  It’s hard to walk away.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

C.F.: I have touched the hearts and minds of thousands of people through my personal story of survival and my niche — DJ skills. I went from DJ-ing to motivational speaking and the combination empowers me to successfully move on in life. I am also a CEO of a corporation that uses multimedia to inspire the world.  Did I forget to mention that I DJ’d for over 380,000 parade attendees this year in Vancouver on a moving float.  That’s going to be hard to top.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

C.F.: I am attempting to write an autobiography, but I have no idea how to start.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

C.F.: I would dedicate my life to the protection of every single frog in the world.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

C.F.: Nothing ever worth it in life ever came easy.

W: Did you take it?

C.F.: I sure did, I have the scars to prove it.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

C.F.: Trail Blazer, Wax Warrior and “The One You Could Trust.”

Crystal Favel is the CEO of Urban Indian Productions and is a proud member of the Métis nation. Favel is also known in North America as DJ Kwe – an award-winning DJ and cutting edge music producer who incorporated her own production company. Her trail-blazing ideas and projects exude innovation, excellence, and sharp-shooting organizational standards. She is known for her ability to inspire thousands of people through her ambitious vision.  “The world awaits me,” she proudly exclaims.

Confidential: Derek Miller

Derek Miller

Derek Miller

May - 2009 

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Derek Miller: Laughter

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

D.M.: When I get pulled over for speeding.

W: When are you at your happiest?

D.M.: When I wake up.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

D.M.: What?

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

D.M.: I admire Rihanna because she is very pretty.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

D.M.: Be patient.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

D.M.: I can cook. Barely!

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

D.M.: Can’t seem to get that girl outta my mind.  Elvis dance chops.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

D.M.: Funk if I know?

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

D.M.: Once you’re past the tang, you got ‘er licked!

W: Did you take it?

D.M.: Yes

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

D.M.: Fondly.  I’m sorry if I have wronged you. Forgive Me. Until we meet again.

A chance meeting with his grandfather’s warp-necked Fender, languishing in a forgotten closet until someone handed it to the 13-year-old, launched Derek Miller’s astounding music career.

“It was as though my grandfather’s spirit was saying `take this, talk to your mystery through it and everything will be fine’,” says Derek.

The teen, born in 1974, discovered what that old guitar could do by listening to Muddy Waters, Stevie Ray Vaughn and Eddie Van Halen tracks from his mother’s record collection. Putting his own fingers to the strings, it wasn’t long before he was playing in pick-up bands and local outfits, practicing and writing music until he released an EP called Sketches in 1999. The production was impressive, but due to its independent release it didn’t amount to many sales.

Touring with Buffy Sainte-Marie and winning a Canadian Aboriginal Music Award followed, as would a move to the United States. Leaving his Six Nations of the Grand River, Mohawk Territory behind, Derek made a career move to Arizona, where he worked with Keith Secola and The Wild Band of Indians. He co-produced Secola’s award-winning Fingermonkey CD and developed his touring chops as he traveled with the group to dates across America and Europe.

It was the release of 2002s Music is the Medicine that earned Derek status in the blues-rock world. He won a Juno with it and hit the road with a vengeance, performing in festivals and opening for the likes of George Thorogood and David Clayton Thomas’ Blood, Sweat and Tears.

But by 2005, as Derek began to record a new CD called The Dirty Looks, he felt he had “lost my soul completely” as the perils of touring caught up with him. Exhausted, he knew he needed help so he went through rehabilitation and “wrung out the laundry.

“Through native culture, ceremony and trauma recovery I felt I’d won my soul back and you can hear that torture on that record. I’m just grateful I lived through it. I am very grateful.”

When The Dirty Looks finally debuted in 2007, it cemented Derek as one of the finest musicians of his generation. According to one reviewer “the songs as part of his spiritual journey serve as a catalyst for the curing of a troubled soul.” Another said the mood on this CD may be somber but his guitar playing is all fire and brimstone.

Derek is also adding to his resumé the role of entrepreneur with his project Derek Miller Enterprises “DME”, a multi-media entertainment company. He’s excited about helping future performers and is “confident the business ventures I am committed to will help build an infrastructure to benefit the generations to come.”

Just how much of a blues-rock virtuoso is Derek? He’s been touted in the Year’s Best for New York’s Village Voice, on the heels of his making the Top Ten of the Year in the Detroit Metro Times Critics poll, alongside the likes of Alice Cooper and the White Stripes.

Confidential: Dr. Evan Adams

Dr. Evan Adams hosts the NAAW 2011

Dr. Evan Adams — [  windspeaker confidential  ]

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Dr. Evan Adams: Self-awareness! Do they know both their strengths and their weaknesses? Do they know what is sacred and funny about themselves? Self-awareness is central to dignity, commitment, morality, listening, and empathy.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

E.A.: Arrogance.

W: When are you at your happiest?

E.A.: It depends if I’m alone or not. If I’m alone: Being at the movies. If it’s a social occasion: Hanging with Aboriginal people! Aboriginal people are usually soooo funny and smart and I know I’m going to laugh and laugh!

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

E.A.: Drunken.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

E.A.: David Suzuki. He’s a legend!

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

E.A.: Pass my medical school exams. Crazy, eh, that a man-made thing would be harder than death or poverty or physical pain? I think it says a lot about the culture of medicine and that sometimes what we want is incredibly hard to achieve.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

E.A.: Smoke Signals was a kind of accomplishment, though I didn’t know it at the time. I was just trying to get it right. It wasn’t until much later that I realized a lot of things came together to make the final product special – and not reproducible.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

E.A.: Well, I guess I’m never going to be the first (biological) man to ever get pregnant. I know this is weird, but I used to dream that I was pregnant. I would dream I was bathing in a river, and look down at my swollen, pregnant belly and be happy…

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

E.A.: If I wasn’t an actor or a doctor? I’d probably be in tourism! I know! I love to travel and visit other cultures. I studied French and Spanish for years with dreams of seeing the Americas… I still love anything Maori or Hawaiian or Polynesian.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

E.A.: “You’re going to be 40 one day anyway; might as well have a degree when you get there!”
W: Did you take it?

E.A.: Yup. In fact, I have a couple (a medical doctorate and a Masters of Public Health). But the arts are where I love to be. We should all have a very good general education and the opportunity to master a number of areas!

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

E.A.: That I did my best for decades… I don’t want to be remembered for the things I screwed up!

Dr. Evan Adams is known as a Canadian actor, playwright, and most recently co-host of this year’s National Aboriginal Achievement Awards broadcast. Adams began life on Nov. 15, 1966. He is Coast Salish from the Sliammon First Nation near Powell River in British Columbia. Awards such as the 1999 Best Debut performance in Smoke Signals and a Los Angeles Outfest award in 2002 for Fancydancing are just a couple of his accomplishments. He also appeared in a documentary called Just Watch Me: Trudeau and the 70’s Generation that spoke to his own experiences as a young gay First Nations man during the Trudeau era in Canada. More recently Adams was appointed the first Aboriginal Health Physician Advisor for the province of B.C and currently is the Director of the Division of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health, UBC Department of Family Practice and past-President of the Indigenous Physicians Association of Canada.

Confidential: Howie Miller

Howie Miller

August - 2010

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?
Howie Miller: Height. Someone with good height can reach things I cannot. They tend to be able to see further. Their shoes are really big so if I wanted to do a clown show, I’d have that option.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?
H.M.: When the TV listings are wrong. I make popcorn, get some sodas, clean the couch, call my friends, and then the show that I want to watch isn’t on. It’s usually my show “Caution May Contain Nuts” on APTN. What channel is that again?

W: When are you at your happiest?
H.M.: When I’m at home with my family and being on stage in front of a hot crowd. I don’t even have to be doing comedy, just standing there in front of a hot crowd.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?
H.M.: Washroom.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?
H.M.: Elvis, because he was the king.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?
H.M.: Try to come up with the one word that best describes me at my worst.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?
H.M.: Having four perfect sons.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?
H.M.: Opening my own comedy club … IN SPACE!

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?
H.M.: Well that’s hard, since I don’t do a lot as it is. I mean I work once or twice a week for about 45 minutes and get paid a ridiculous amount, so I guess I’d be a lawyer.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?
H.M.: Insert Tab “A” into Slot “B”.

W: Did you take it?
H.M.: Always.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?
H.M.: I guess I’d like to be remembered as the guy who could always make you smile.  The guy you could rely on. If you needed a hug, Howie Miller was your guy. And since I’m not going anywhere for a while, I’d like to be remembered as the guy who opened up the first comedy club.... IN SPACE!

Howie Miller (Cree) has been called one of the funniest Native American comedians and actors on television today. Born and raised in Edmonton, his quick wit and unique point of view on multi-ethnic stereotypes has garnered numerous television appearances and placed him in great demand on the corporate circuit. Howie’s stand-up routine also includes entertaining stories about his son’s overnight success as one of the most-watched young actors in front of the camera today. How much better can it get than being Howie’s son, Tyson, playing “Quil Ateara”, a member of the wolf-pack in The Twilight Saga: New Moon and Eclipse?

Howie has performed across North America, including New York, Los Angeles and the prestigious Montreal Just for Laughs Comedy Festival.  He has also toured the United Kingdom and Europe. Howie has been featured in his own half-hour special Comedy Now Presents Howie Miller and in The Indian Comedy Slam, No Reservations Needed, which is currently airing on Showtime. Howie is also an accomplished actor and writer, having been nominated for a Gemini award in 2009 for “Best Writing in a Comedy or Variety Program” for Caution: May Contain Nuts which will be airing its second season on APTN in 2010.

Confidential: Inez Jasper

Inez Jasper

March - 2011

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?
Inez: Trustworthiness. It’s hard to come by these days, but I’ve been blessed with some good solid friends.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?
I.J.: Ignorance and racism. It makes my blood boil.

W: When are you at your happiest?
I.J.: It’s a toss up: Either when I’m getting a tickle attack from my son or rocking out onstage.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?
I.J.: Grumpy. I can’t lie. I can be a grumpy pants sometimes, but I’ve learned to see the silver lining.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?
I.J.: My mother. She’s hardworking and always makes time for everyone.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?
I.J.: The most difficult thing was the time I had to put on a happy face after hearing bad news from my home community while I was on the road. I wanted to curl up and cry but I knew that I had to keep moving and continue my journey. I had to make a positive out of a negative. That was a tough day.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?
I.J.: My son. I have learned many lessons from him and he continues to be my most influential teacher to this day.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?
I.J.: I used to dream about being on TV and performing for thousands of cheering fans. It seemed like that dream was out of reach. Now that I’ve performed on live television that dream became a reality. Perhaps now, my crazy aspiration about crossing over into the mainstream music industry is not a goal that is out of reach. Hmmm.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?
I.J.: I would be starring in the Real Housewives of the Sto:lo Nation, running a youth group, children’s choir and making babies.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received? I.J.: Don’t work harder; work smarter.

W: Did you take it?
I.J.: Yep!

W: How do you hope to be remembered?
I.J.: Inez Jasper. She helped to pave the way for Aboriginal entertainers to be recognized for their work and inspired many people to pursue a career as a nurse.

Inez is a Sto:lo singer/songwriter with powerhouse talent and universal appeal. As one of Canada’s top Aboriginal musicians, her blend of traditional Native sounds with a love for contemporary hip hop and R&B brings the best of her culture to the mainstream world. Exploding onto the Canadian music scene in 2006 and releasing her hit album Singsoulgirl in 2008, this proud Sto:lo, Ojibway and Metis artist has been featured at myriad high profile events across the country, including 2009 Aboriginal People’s Choice Awards, 2009 Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards and 14 shows at the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, not to mention feature spots on national television programs like Aboriginal Day Live! and The New Canoe. Despite all the attention, she maintains an endearing humility and commitment to inspiring youth.

This past year, Inez was recognized with three Canadian Aboriginal Music Award nominations, a Western Canadian Music Award nomination, a Juno nomination, and she took home four 2009 Aboriginal People’s Choice Awards! In 2010 she was nominated for two Aboriginal People’s Choice Awards and made a huge splash with her performance of her upcoming single Make You Mine.

Confidential: Jennie Williams

Jennie Williams

 Jennie Williams

 January - 2009

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Jennie Williams: A great friend is someone who will always be there for you even when they physically can’t. It’s a person who you can act your absolute true self around.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

J.W.: I get upset when people use stereotypes in their every day lives and have no respect for the values and beliefs in other cultures but their own. People need to have an open mind and have respect for all people no matter who they are and where they come from.

W: When are you at your happiest?

J.W.: When I am speaking to a person or a group of people and I can tell by their response that I am making a positive impact on their lives by talking about the things I believe in and think are important in life.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

J.W.: Hopelessness.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

J.W.: It is not specifically one person I admire; it is the women I meet who overcome adversity and many obstacles in their lives and always stay strong and committed to staying positive no matter what comes their way.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

J.W.: Live on my own at a very young age. I had to learn things quick. I had to grow up a lot quicker than people the same age as me at the time and sometimes it was not easy.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

J.W.: My greatest accomplishment so far would be receiving my award this year from the Governor General in Ottawa for being chosen as a National Aboriginal Role Model for 2008.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

J.W.: My goal is to travel the world. This year I had the opportunity to travel to many places across Canada and also to Mexico and Guatemala. There are so many more places I want to go and I look forward to the many adventures in travelling that are to come.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

J.W.: I would like to be sailing through the mountains of Northern Labrador.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

J.W.: Always listen to and remember advice you receive from your Elders.

W: Did you take it?

J.W.: I try my best every day of my life.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

J.W.:  I hope to be remembered as someone who has made a positive impact on people’s lives. I hope to be remembered for my kindness, respect and commitment to keeping our culture alive for future generations with all that I can give.

Jennie Williams was born and raised in Labrador. She is currently residing in Nain, Nunatsiavut. She is an Inuit visual and performing artist committed to keeping her heritage and culture alive through the arts. She has traveled many times across Canada to perform and also to Mexico and Guatemala.

She uses different mediums to depict the traditional Inuit way of life including drum-dancing, throat-singing, painting, photography and traditional crafts; she also coordinates workshops to teach others.

Williams received the 2008 National Aboriginal Role Model Award from the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) for her achievements.

Confidential: Larissa Tobacco

Larissa Tobacco

January -  2008

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?
Larrissa Tobacco: I value above anything, honesty. I can count my true friends on one hand and what they all have in common is honesty.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?
L.T.: Ignorance really irks me, but hey, can’t win ‘em all, right?

W: When are you at your happiest?
L.T.: The very moment I walk out of an exam that I’ve just spent the last two weeks studying for and know that I’ve done well. Ah, redemption!

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?
L.T.: Well you’d have to ask my mom ... probably miserable.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?
L.T.: My mom, ‘cause she puts up with me! ... I hope that I am only privileged enough in my lifetime to be as graceful, intelligent, independent, strong and loving as she is.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?
L.T.: Burying my daughter. After I did that, I thought to myself ... life can give me whatever it can ‘cause nothing could ever be as bad as that moment and that I could live life knowing that I’ve weathered the storm.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?
L.T.: Honestly I think to date if the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards go off well-fingers crossed-then that will it be it.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?
L.T.: No goal is out of reach. Some goals I haven’t yet accomplished, but nothing is out of reach if you just believe in yourself and never give up.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?
L.T.: Honestly, I am very blessed to be doing everything I wanted to do in life. I promised myself a long time ago that I’d never look back on my life while on my death bed and think to myself, “I wonder what would’ve happened if I had done something else.” Instead I’ll look back and say, “Well, at least I tried, and damn, was it fun!”

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve every received?
L.T.: One day when I was younger and being a brat-’cause I really was! - I came home to find all my dirty clothes cleaned with a note on top written by my mom saying, “Larissa, I’ve done this for you not because of how you’ve been treating people, but because I want to show you how to treat people. Love Mom.”

W: Did you take it?
L.T.: I’ll never forget that advice and still to this day, when someone is mean to me, I try to be extra nice to them. You’d be surprised how people react to that.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?
L.T.: As someone with the biggest heart in the world.

Twenty-two-year-old actor and student Larissa Tobacco is probably best known for her work as host of the APTN program Upload, and her time spent as a contestant in MuchMusic's 2006 VJ Search. In the New Year she'll be adding another entry to her resume, when she takes on the hosting duties for the 15th annual National Aboriginal Achievement Awards gala, to be held in Toronto on March 7. The gala event, which will see awards presented to 14 exceptional Aboriginal achievers, will air nationally on APTN and Global Television at a later date.

Confidential: Myron A. Lameman

Myron A. Lameman

 

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?
MAL: Integrity.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?
MAL: Feeling useless. It can be frustrating being in film, because sometimes I doubt myself if I don’t have the latest and greatest equipment. You just have to get over that and shoot something.

W: When are you at your happiest?
MAL: I’m happiest when I finish a film and complete that loop. Film can take a long time from concept to distribution, so I work on other projects as a cinematographer or editor. I’m healthy and happy as long as I’m busy and especially if I’m helping someone else.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?
MAL: Apathetic.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?
MAL: My wife. She is always encouraging and supporting others, including me, while accomplishing her own projects.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?
MAL: Putting myself out there has been difficult. I’m my own worst critic. This can be good during production if you use it to make the film better as long as it doesn’t get in the way, but when your film is done and out at festivals, you have to let it have its own life. You can never really know what other people will see in your work or where it will go.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?
MAL: My son and soon-to-be-born daughter are the greatest gifts. They’ve taught me to be a kid again and just play.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?
MAL: I’m developing features that I hope to direct in the future. One way is to shoot a low budget indie feature on my own. Another is to master directing short films. It’s important to get more experience directing before expecting support (without having to hand the film over), but I’m confident that it will be within reach soon.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?
MAL: Right now I’m working in film, but I’m interested in web comics, animation, and video games. I’ve recently been inspired by writing for an animated series. I’d also like to design video games with Cree language and culture for my children.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?
MAL: It’s important to be mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually balanced.

W: Did you take it?
MAL: It’s an ongoing process that I feel I’ve made improvements with thanks to support from friends and family.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?
MAL: As a good husband, dad, and artist who made some provocative stuff.

Myron A. Lameman comes from Beaver Lake Cree Nation in Alberta. He is a 2008 graduate of the Capilano University in North Vancouver, BC and during that time he was a part of the Indigenous Independent Digital Filmmaking and Advanced Cinematography program.

During his time there he created a seven-minute short film called Mihkoh and an additional 20-minute continuation called Nipiwin. Lameman said that Mihkoh and Nipiwin “speak strongly to the work I continue to pursue , films with political, social or cultural perspectives imagining alternative histories and futures of Indigenous people and the land.”

More recently Lameman has written, directed, edited and done the cinematography on Blue in the Face, a comedy short released in October 2010 dealing with the effect of a popular Hollywood film on one of its Native viewers. His newest documentary, released in 2011, is Extraction. It deals with the effects of oil extraction from the Alberta tar sands on his home reserve’s people, wildlife and land. He received funding support from the National Geographic’s All Roads Film Project.

Confidential: Robert Animikii Horton

Robert Animikii Horton

Robert Animikii Horton
November - 2008

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Robert Animikii Horton: Integrity. Integrity is everything.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

R.A.H.: Honestly? When our young men do not respect our women. One cannot respect seven generations forward, or the future, if they cannot respect those who make each possible.

W: When are you at your happiest?

R.A.H.: I am at my happiest when I know I’ve helped, in some way, to create positive changes for our youth and communities. We’re standing within winds of change and this wind is at our backs. All it takes is a choice.

 

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

R.A.H.: Motivated. I find any sort of challenge a catalyst to motivate and to focus.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

R.A.H.: The late Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone. He was a man of vision and initiative – a  political organizer and activist who fought for social justice. I promised myself early on that these were the footsteps I would follow and this was the example I wanted to live for my own people.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

R.A.H.: Probably move away from best friends and family to pursue my dreams.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

R.A.H.: Choosing education and political/community involvement over darker roads I began going down when I was younger. This choice, alone, probably saved my life.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

R.A.H.: My Ph.D. But it is only out of reach for the time being.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

R.A.H.: I would probably continue learning my language (Anishinaabemowin) and decide to be a language instructor.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

R.A.H.: Never separate the life you live from the words you speak.

W: Did you take it?

R.A.H.: Absolutely! And I live it everyday.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

R.A.H.: I hope to be remembered as an activist, first and foremost, who lived with integrity, conviction, and vision; someone who always put the well being of his People as priority and never strayed from this. I want to leave a legacy.

Robert (Bebaamweyaazh) Animikii Horton, 26, is Anishinaabe (Marten Clan) from Rainy River First Nations, Manitou Rapids Ontario. He is one of twelve exceptional young people chosen to be National Aboriginal Role Models in a program sponsored by the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO). The scholar, activist and future leader is completing his Master’s degree in Sociology and has recently developed a First Nation Student Support Education Framework called The Gakino Amawaagan Support Wheel. Horton is a sociologist, scholar and political activist, internationally recognized orator, published writer, polemicist, and spoken-word poet. Horton has received the 2008 "Heroes of our Time" Awards from the Assembly of First Nations, Honourary Lifetime Induction to Alpha Kappa Delta (International Honors Society for Sociologists), and recently was the recipient of statements of commendation for activism, First Nation leadership, and youth advocacy from P.C. Members of Parliament, the Hon. Joe Comuzzi and the Hon. Tony Clement.

Horton says, “It’s more than possible to have strong roots and strong wings – be the change you wish to see. Defy convention. Hope, dream, imagine and inspire!”

Caption for photo: Robert stands near Kay-nah-chi-wah-nung (Long Sault Rapids), an area along the Rainy River featuring the largest concentration of traditional burial mounds in Canada. Horton’s family, along with many others, were forced to move from Long Sault to Manitou Rapids in 1914 and 1915, breaking the agreements of Treaty #3, which Robert’s ancestor, Chief Mawedopenais, helped negotiate in 1873.

Caption for photo: Robert stands near Kaynahchiwahnung (Long Sault Rapids), an area along the Rainy River featuring the largest concentration of traditional burial mounds in Canada. Horton’s family, along with many others, were forced to move from Rainy River to Manitou Rapids in 1914 and 1915, breaking the agreements of Treaty #3, which Robert’s ancestor, Chief Mawedopenais, negotiated in 1873.

Confidential: Robyn Goodwin

Robyn Goodwin

Robyn Goodwin

June 2009

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Robyn Goodwin: The quality I value most in a friend is trust. I believe, in this day and age, for young women you have to be strong and have a firm belief in humanity to be able to possess this quality. I also think that trust works both ways and that you also have to be trustworthy.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

R.G.: Failure. To leave something unaccomplished or unfinished always leaves a void and raises the question, what if?

W: When are you at your happiest?

R.G.: Playing hockey. It’s what I love doing. All the stress of life and impending difficulties vanish while I’m on the ice.

W: What word best describes you when you’re at your worst?

R.G.: Irritable.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

R.G.: My dad. He tries to show us the right way by letting us know the wrong paths he took as a young person, but he never forces us to do it his way. He tells us that through hard work and determination you can be what you want to be. Never be content with your present situation.

W:  What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

R.G.: Moving to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the United States as a 17-year-old. I had to leave my family, friends and Canada to pursue a university education and continue my hockey career.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

R.G.: Attending university and playing hockey in the United States.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

R.G.: Getting a job that includes the sport of hockey in which I would be able to apply myself completely; and in that job I’d like to also be able to help youth.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

R.G.: I would definitely be involved in community sports programming for youth.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

R.G.:  Just to enjoy and have fun in what you are experiencing today. Enjoy life and what it is presenting to you now.

W: Did you take it?

R.G.: Yes.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

R.G.: Hopefully as someone who took the time to use her talents in hockey and who tried to help those who are in need. Also someone who was competitive and determined.

 

Robyn Lee-Anne Goodwin was born on Oct. 4, 1989 in Winnipeg, Man. She is the youngest child of the family and has two older brothers. No wonder she started playing hockey on an outdoor rink near her house. She was always the only girl skating with the guys. Her days would consist of going to school and then heading straight to the rink to play hockey until the rink was shut down. Her parents would have to come and get her and her brothers, or they would play on even after the lights were turned off. When she wasn’t skating she was at her brothers’ hockey games. At one game Robyn noticed a girls’ team getting ready to hit the ice and she decided she wanted to be one of them. At the age of 10, she began playing organized hockey, and at 16 she was selected to represent Manitoba at the National Aboriginal Hockey Championships. Her team took the bronze medal, a first for a female team in Manitoba. Robyn loved the experience and continued to represent Manitoba for two more years.

After graduating from high school in 2007 she attended university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. While attending secondary school, she continued to play hockey at the university level, and it was while she was there that she received news that one of her former coaches had passed away from cancer. When she returned from university she wanted to do something special and unique in memory of her coach, so she spearheaded “Play for the Cure 2008,” a women’s only hockey tournament that raises funds for Cancer Care Manitoba. As Robyn says: “Losing a friend is always hard so to be able to use your talents and have so many other players believe in the cause you’re standing up for makes the loss a little less painful. It’s great to try and make a difference. This year the tournament is back and the work in organizing it is worthwhile if we can help at least one person beat this disease.”

Confidential: Stephen Kakfwi

 

Stephen Kakfwi

Stephen Kakfwi

February - 2009

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Stephen Kakfwi: I really appreciate a friend who has a positive attitude.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

S.K.: Bullies who wear suits who pretend that they like themselves.

W: When are you at your happiest?

S.K.: When I’m alone with my wife, my children, and my grandchildren.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

S.K.: Sullen and dark.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

S.K.: My grandfather. He was unilingual, never went to school or ever spoke English, but was a successful trapper and hunter who started and owned his own fur trading business and general store.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

S.K.: Learn how to forgive.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

S.K.: Being more at peace with myself.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

S.K.: Though, as I said in my last answer, I have found more peace within myself, I still don’t have the kind of inner peace – that pure tranquility – that many Elders become blessed with at advanced stages in their lives. I’m getting there, but I’m definitely not there yet.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

S.K.: Writing a book of poems and stories.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

S.K.: Don’t wish or pray for what you don’t need. Everything you need is there. You just have to learn how to see it. This came from my grandfather in a dream.

W: Did you take it?

S.K.: Yes.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

S.K.: As a man of a few little gifts who saw opportunities and seized them in the moment.

A former premier of the Northwest Territories, Stephen Kakfwi quit more than 25 years of politics in 2003 to realize his lifelong dream of writing and performing music. Born in a traditional Dene bush camp on Yelta Lake near Fort Good Hope, Kakfwi spent his early years on the land, learning the customs of his people and developing a life-long respect for the wilderness and its resources.

He survived residential school and went on to pursue a teaching degree, but returned home to become involved in securing Aboriginal land and self-government rights. He organized Dene, Métis, and southern support groups to respond to increased oil and gas exploration in the north. Aboriginal involvement in the Mackenzie Valley natural gas pipeline inquiry resulted in Justice Tom Berger recommending a moratorium on development until land claims were settled and measures were in place to protect the fragile Mackenzie Valley and Beaufort Sea environment. The ruling became a model for the future regulation of mega-projects in Canada.

Between 1983 and 1987, Kakfwi headed up the Dene Nation, and was elected to represent the Sahtu constituency of the Great Bear Lake region, and then acted as N.W.T. premier between 2000 and 2003.

Kakfwi quit politics abruptly, saying his life had become a battleground. When he took some time to work on himself and heal old hurts, many stemming from his childhood in residential school, words to songs began pouring out of him and he put guitar music to them. To date, he’s released two CD’s:

In the Walls of His Mind and Last Chance Hotel.

Kakfwi continues to be active regarding a variety of initiatives, including the promotion of conservation in the N.W.T. and as an advisor to the World Wildlife Foundation. He’s also working with his home community, government and other organizations to ensure benefits and revenue from the development of a newly proposed Mackenzie Valley pipeline. He’s also a sought-after public speaker

Confidential: Suzette Amaya

Suzette Amaya

Suzette Amaya

March - 2009

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Suzette Amaya: In a friend I value honesty. I believe someone who is honest with themselves and others is someone I can truly feel free to be myself with and share wonderful interactions with. Being true to oneself is a great quality and opens you up to self discovery.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

S.A.: Lateral violence. I am not an angry kind of person, but it upsets me that lateral violence is ever-present in our communities. So many more people could be leaders, and successful, but lateral violence can harm a person’s soul, dignity, and self-esteem, and is a terrible disease that breeds negativity and unhealthy behavior.

W: When are you at your happiest?

S.A.: I am at my happiest just being home with my family: My sons Julian and Josiah and my husband Stanley. If I can’t be at home, then a wonderful walk around a lake, feeding ducks, or bike riding makes me happy. Enjoying the simple pleasures. And I must say soccer practice with the North Shore Renegades, my soccer team in the Metro Vancouver Women’s League, that’s some good Soul Food as well.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

S.A.: Tired. After working a double shift at my regular job as a Shelter Support Worker in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, I am at my most non-glam, emotionally drained, and non-creative mode.

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

S.A. I admire Elaine Bomberry. She is inspiring, other than Oprah and my BFF my Mom! Elaine is definitely one of my mentors. She is the queen of networking and getting the job done. Her passion for Aboriginal media and arts (Google Murray Porter and Rez Blues and the Junos) excites me! She is a professional and a leader in the industry! My mom is also, of course, on the top of all lists. She is a survivor and the kindest, most loving person I know. She is a drug and alcohol counsellor and is so multi-talented. Her humble, kind, non-judgemental personality has carved who I am today. I definitely aspire to be just like her!

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

S.A.: The most difficult thing I have ever had to do was Psychology 300 stats in college and maybe that log rolling contest I did in Kyuquot! But on a serious note, a challenge was facing my abuser when I was in high school and taking him to court and charging him for abuse. It was a new beginning and an end; I was reborn the day I allowed myself to heal and I pat myself on the back for having the courage to not allow myself to be controlled by my negative experiences.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

S.A.: My children. My sons are such angels. Being a mother is my ultimate priority–just working, never sleeping and ensuring their routine and life needs are met is my greatest accomplishment. I pray that they will also be successful leaders with kind loving hearts! I have other monumental accomplishments I must say I am proud of, like creating ThinkNDN (Best Aboriginal Radio Show at the Aboriginal Peoples Choices Awards 2008) and becoming a National Aboriginal Role Model for Canada in 2007.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

S.A.: Out of reach? Never! I would love to get into television and become like the Native Oprah without the money and all–just something to share others’ talents, share their stories and provide Canada with a quality show of Aboriginal pop culture!

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

S.A.: I would love to eventually go into law. I could be a student forever! My educational background is criminology, so law school has always been something that interests me, or running my band, GwaSala-Nakwaxda’xw Nation.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

S.A.: Love one another and pray, pray, pray! I live by faith alone and truly “let God and let go! Also, love your enemies.

W: Did you take it?

S.A.: Yes! I love, love, love! Who are we to judge and not love others? There are times when I have to let God fight my battles and so I truly believe that we reap what we sow!

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

S.A.: I would like to be remembered as that girl people felt comfortable with and who made a positive impact in some way ... or, well, as that “ThinkNDN” girl; that works for me too!

Suzette Amaya is on her way to becoming the Aboriginal Oprah. Her love of media has led her to create ThinkNDN, a radio show, and SAMAYA photography. She is a motivational speaker who has just begun her Love, Live, Lead Tour 2009 across Canada, speaking to youth about everything from sexual abuse to employment strategies. She is in the music industry, but also reaches out to people as a Shelter Support Worker in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver.

Confidential: Trevor Duplessis

 

Trevor Duplessis

Trevor Duplessis

April - 2009

Windspeaker: What one quality do you most value in a friend?

Trevor Duplessis: Patience. My wife Amelia could tell you that you need a lot of this.

W: What is it that really makes you mad?

T.D.: People who hurt or take advantage of those who can’t defend or speak up for themselves.

W: When are you at your happiest?

T.D.: Either when I come home and my kids smile at me or when I’m back stage before a show, and the stage is out there, quietly waiting for me.

W: What one word best describes you when you are at your worst?

T.D.: Scattered

W: What one person do you most admire and why?

T.D.: My mother’s sense of family and undying commitment knows no bounds. I intend to let her example flow through me to my children.

W: What is the most difficult thing you’ve ever had to do?

T.D.: I had to leave my family for five weeks to tour In a World Created by a Drunken God. I spent three weeks in Ontario before flying to Europe for two more weeks. I remember getting on the plane, thinking ‘I can’t believe I’m actually getting on a plane to go further away from my family!’ Amelia kept emailing me pictures of our girls to help keep me sane, and they grew and changed on me every week.

W: What is your greatest accomplishment?

T.D.: Getting the Best Actor Award for the Drunken God film in San Francisco was pretty big for me. I’ve spent 10 years in Edmonton doing some really good theatre, but I’ve been mostly overlooked by the professional companies and bigger film projects. To get acknowledgement from people in other countries and Canadian cities made me realize that the ‘powers that be’ in the Edmonton arts scene might not be the experts I once thought they were.

W: What one goal remains out of reach?

T.D.: I write crime fiction. To get published and put one of my books on my shelf between Raymond Chandler and Loren D. Estleman would be a dream come true.

W: If you couldn’t do what you’re doing today, what would you be doing?

T.D.: I have a teaching background, so I’d probably be teaching high school somewhere.

W: What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

T.D.: It’s from my dad, Roland. He tells me every couple of years: Life is short.

You only get one of them. Go after your goal with complete commitment, and the journey towards it often ends up being where the important stuff really is.

W: Did you take it?

T.D.: Every day. And, yes, I’ve thanked him.

W: How do you hope to be remembered?

T.D.: That I was a dream chaser, but family came first. That I worked very hard, though not always smart. That I had a couple of gifts that I couldn’t quite explain, but was very, very thankful for.

Trevor Duplessis is a Métis actor and teacher who has Education and Fine Arts in Acting degrees from the University of Alberta. His favorite stage shows over the years include Glengarry Glenn Ross, Jesus Christ Superstar, Macbeth, and Running: The Alex Decoteau Story. He recently toured to Calgary, Ontario, San Francisco and Eastern Europe for the stage and Pyramid Productions/APTN film versions of Drew Hayden Taylor’s In a World Created by a Drunken God. He received the Best Actor Award at the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco for the film last year. Trevor is a program coordinator and drama instructor at Yellowhead Tribal College in Edmonton, where he lives with his wife Amelia and daughters Halina and Adelaide.

To find out more about his theatre work, you can Google his name or type Trevor Duplessis on You Tube to see excerpts of his performance in Drunken God.

Footprints

Footprints

Presenting biographies of some outstanding Indigenous people who have left a legacy for others. We thank them for their contributions to their communities and their people and we strive to always remember them. Follow in their footprints...

Albert Diamond - Footprints

Albert Diamond

Trapline made Albert Diamond ready for business

By Dianne Meili

Living shoulder-to-shoulder with three other families on the trapline from September to March taught Albert Diamond about equality.

The president of Air Creebec Inc., who passed away suddenly from a heart attack on Sept. 9, 2009 at age 58, carried his childhood values into the boardroom to establish unprecedented economic success for Northern Quebec Cree.

The traditional values of caring and sharing, responsible for the fact "there were never really any arguments" and "everyone depended on each other" during the fall and winter cycle, are the same ones Diamond touted in speeches to global organizations that continually sought his advice.

"One of our best values is to share," he said in a video on the Grand Council of the Crees Web site. "And in business, health issues, or anything, if we (James Bay Cree) have knowledge, we'll share it with other communities when they ask."

"I learned early on, if I don't have the resources, not to be afraid to go to the people who do," he added.

Diamond was the first to admit he was not always a traditional person. He was away from home in Moose Factory for schooling 10 months of the year from the age of six.

"I was assimilated into the non-Native culture," he explained, and though he yearned to be with his parents on the land while away at school, he found reason to value his education when he came home in the summertime.

"My dad, as the chief of our community, would have a suitcase of letters for us kids to translate when we got home. He told us 'I wish I could read and write and speak English, then I could do more for our people.' Reading those letters, I could see the government wasn't giving him the time of day and he was frustrated.

Diamond recalled asking himself 'what do you have to do to make changes happen?' and deciding at a young age the answer was in education.

But in his second year of university, a call from his brother, Chief Billy Diamond, changed his life. Robert Bourassa had announced the James Bay Project and Billy was taking the government to court.

At a time when land claims and agreements were unheard of, the Cree won the case to protect their traditional way of life. In 1975, the James Bay Agreement was signed with Quebec and the Grand Council of the Crees was born.

"During the two-year period of negotiations, we tracked down Crees who had college educations and who could come and work for us," Albert Diamond said in his video. "And all this time I was thinking 'this sounds very familiar," because my father always tried to get people to work together'."

Diamond was elected by the chiefs to oversee management, investment and distribution of the money paid to the Crees under the agreement. From its inception in 1978 to 1990, as chairman of the Cree Board of Compensation, he made decisions that saw subsidiaries like Cree Construction, Air Creebec, Servinor and other business ventures flourish.

Under his leadership, the business volume of Creeco grew from $4 million to over $100 million, including $62 million from the Cree Construction Company.

Over the years he lent his expertise to direct ventures other than those with a financial focus, like the board of health and social services.

Despite the money, Diamond acknowledged his peoples' struggles with violence and drug and alcohol abuse.

"There has been a fast pace of change. Yes, we have the negative aspects that result from that, but we also have our own people to deal with it. We have Cree social workers. On the whole, our quality of life has improved and we have made room for sports arenas, gathering places and homes for the Elders."

Add to this a Cree school board where Cree language is taught exclusively during the first three years of a child's life, and wherein a mandatory four-week canoe expedition teaches students respect for the land, customs and traditions, and it is obvious Diamond had a hand in keeping his peers' priorities straight.

Air Creebec Inc. Chairman Jack Blacksmith worked alongside Diamond for almost 20 years.

"I am serious when I say no one will ever compare with Albert," Blacksmith said. "He was our "go-to" guy.
Whenever we had someone new and they wanted to get direction, off they'd go to Albert."

"It's not just anybody who can take three or four companies and totally turn them around. He made it work.

"He was always ready to share, and he was totally respected. His very large presence is gone, and he will be missed."

Alex Decoteau - Footprints

Alex Decoteau:Difficult beginnings, life of achievement

Cheryl Petten

Deceased: October 30, 1917

Alex Decoteau was an accomplished athlete, a police officer and Canadian soldier

Each spring, students in Edmonton gather to take part in a five-kilometre race named in honor of Alexander Wuttunee Decoteau. To the children, Decoteau is a role model, an example of what people can accomplish with their lives. And although Decoteau's life was a short one, almost 90 years after his death he still inspires others with his example.

Alex Decoteau was born on Nov. 19, 1887 on the Red Pheasant Reserve near North Battleford, Sask. He was the second youngest of five children born to Mary and Peter Decoteau. When he was just three years old, his father was murdered and his mother, left with no means to support herself and her family, asked that three of her children be placed in the nearby Battleford industrial school.

Peter Decoteau had been employed by the Indian department for many years up until his death, and the department agreed to Mrs. Decoteau's request, and young Alex began his studies at the industrial school.

Decoteau was a good student and an exceptional athlete. He excelled at a number of sports, including boxing, cricket and soccer. He also demonstrated his ability as a runner.

When he finished school, Decoteau moved to Edmonton where a job awaited him in a machine shop owned by his brother-in-law. He also continued to run, and soon made a name for himself as a middle and long-distance runner.

He ran his first competitive race in Fort Saskatchewan, Alta. in May 1909 and came in second. He had greater success in his next race the following month, a five-mile race held during the Edmonton Exhibition. But it would be his next race that would make people sit up and take notice. It was the Mayberry Cup in Lloydminster, located on the Saskatchewan/Alberta border, another five-mile race. When he'd crossed the finish line that day in July, Decoteau had set a new western Canadian record, finishing in 27 minutes, 45.2 seconds.

In 1909, Decoteau left the machine shop for a career in policing. He joined the city of Edmonton's police force, becoming Canada's first Aboriginal police officer. And he continued to run and to win.

In 1910, he entered the Alberta provincial championships held in Lethbridge. Decoteau competed in four events-the half-mile, one-mile, two-mile and five-mile races-and took first place in each of them.

His list of racing accomplishments includes winning the Calgary Herald's Christmas Day Road Race three times, the Hon. C.W. Cross Challenge Cup in Edmonton five times, and the annual 10-mile race in Fort Saskatchewan three times.

In 1912, Decoteau was given a leave from his policing duties so he could represent Canada in the Olympic Games in Stockholm, Sweden, competing in the 5,000-metre event. Decoteau finished second in his qualifying heat and in the final was running in third place after the fourth lap when he began getting leg cramps. When the race was over, he had finished in eighth place.

Despite not winning a medal, Decoteau arrived home from the Olympics to a hero's welcome, complete with a parade down Jasper Avenue, right through the heart of downtown Edmonton.
After the Olympics, Decoteau returned to policing. He was promoted to police sergeant and was given his own station. He also continued to run, winning almost every race he entered.

Then, in 1916, Decoteau answered a call to another kind of duty.

He enlisted with the Canadian army in April 1916. He would use his athletic abilities in aid of King and country, serving as a runner in the trenches during the Second World War. The following May, he shipped out overseas with the 49th Canadian Battalion, arriving in France.

In a letter to his sister written in early September 1917, Decoteau talked about his experiences in the war. He spoke fondly of all the people from Edmonton he'd run into in France, and told her about a bout of trench fever he was just beginning to recover from. He asked her not to tell their mother he'd been ill. He didn't see any reason to worry her needlessly.

By the end of October, Decoteau found himself in Belgium, and in the thick of the battle on Passchendaele Ridge. British and Australian troops had been battling at Passchendaele for months, with little to show for their efforts other than mounting casualties.

The battle to take the ridge was an important one to the allies, as the high ground would give them footing to launch attacks on ports on the Belgian coast, under the control of German troops and being used as bases for their submarines. The allied forces launched their assaults from the only part of Belgium they still held, around the town of Ypres. The Canadian troops would try to take the ridge battle by battle, bit by bit.

The Canadian effort was eventually successful, but at a huge cost. By the time the Canadians had secured the ridge on Nov. 10, 16,000 Canadian soldiers had been killed or wounded or were missing. One of those 16,000 was 29-year-old Alex Decoteau, who died in the morning hours of Oct. 30, killed by a sniper's bullet during an attack on the German line.

The bodies of some of those who fell at Passchendaele were never recovered but were instead claimed by the mud of the battlefield. Those who were recovered lie in a number of cemeteries surrounding the battle site, some identified, but many more buried as the unknown dead.
Alex Decoteau was buried in the Passchendaele New British Cemetery north of Passchendaele, alongside 649 other Canadian soldiers killed.

In 1985, Decoteau's friends and family gathered in Edmonton to hold a special ceremony to bring his spirit home. In attendance were members of the Red Pheasant band council, First Nations veterans, representatives from the Canadian Armed Forces and a 10-member honor guard from the Edmonton Police Service. A drum group performed a burial song, then a piper from the police department played Amazing Grace.

Decoteau's many achievements continue to be recognized and remembered to this day.
He has been inducted into the Edmonton City Police Hall of Fame, the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and the Saskatchewan First Nations Sport Hall of Fame. He was also named one of the 100 Edmontonians of the Century as part of that city's centennial celebrations being held this year.

Alfred Scow - Footprints

Alfred Scow

Retired judge worked to bridge equality gap

By Dianne Meili

Deceased February 26, 2012

Alfred Scow, the first Aboriginal judge ever appointed to B.C. court, had much to celebrate.

But he refused the “role model” moniker, taking more pleasure, it seemed, in the idea he may have played a part in reconciling the gap between Aboriginal and mainstream Canada.

Placing no blame and fuelling no anger, Alfred chose a passive approach to educate Canadians about the disparate Aboriginal experience. In his retirement years, for example, he published Secret of the Dance, imparting the true story of how he, as a nine-year-old child, snuck in to watch his father dance at a potlatch, ceremonies prohibited at the time by the Indian Act.
Written with Andrea Spalding and Darlene Gault, the book  was selected as one of the 2007 Best Books for Kids and Teens by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre.

Tina Dion, a Cree lawyer in Vancouver, met Scow in 1996 when he appealed to her University of British Columbia law class for help.

“He had a question for us,” recalled Dion. “He wanted Aboriginal students to advise him in his efforts to combat misinformation about Aboriginal people in the media.” Dion sensed his genuine purpose and helped him establish the Scow Institute for Communicating Information on Aboriginal issues, of which she is currently president.

The institute was named for Scow without his knowledge.

“He and Joan (his wife) missed one meeting and that’s when the committee came up with the name. We joked, ‘That’s what you get when you miss a meeting,’” Dion explained in a 2010 article in the Law Society of British Columbia’s Bencher’s Bulletin.

The Scow Institute is responsible for making available unbiased information about specific laws that affect Aboriginal people and shape their experience.

According to Dion, “Alfred was a decade shy of not being able to be a lawyer.” A law was passed in 1919 preventing First Nations and other minorities from being admitted to the legal profession, because they were barred from voting in government elections.
“Aboriginal people were only allowed to vote in 1960, and Alfred graduated in 1961, so he just made it in,” Dion said. Before that, he was not considered a Canadian citizen.

Not only was Scow the first Aboriginal judge in B.C., he was also the first Aboriginal to graduate from law school in B.C., and also the first called to the bar in that province. He was awarded the Order of Canada in 2000 and the Order of B.C. in 2004.

Born April 10, 1927 in Alert Bay, Scow’s parents were Chief William Scow of the Kwicksutaineuk Nation, and his mother’s name was Alice. The couple valued formal education and used subtle cohersion to keep their son in school.

As Scow recalled in an article published in 2005 in the UBC Law Alumni Magazine, at 15 he told his parents he wanted to quit school to fish and support the family of 18. They agreed, and Scow was secretly disappointed they didn’t argue with him. A few days later he overheard them talking about arranging his marriage now that he was a working man. He tiptoed out of the house and went for a long walk, pondering this unexpected turn of events. The next day he announced he would stay in school and continued his studies for the next 20 years.

Scow’s story has an epilogue: years later, at a family gathering he took his parents aside and asked if they knew he could hear their conversation of so many years ago. Smiling, they nodded “yes.”
Alfred could have been the poster boy for the saying ‘slow and steady wins the race.’ He had fished with his father from the time he was six, and financed his law degree on halibut and salmon boats. At first, he found the concepts of the western legal system to be foreign, and claimed to be far from an academic. He found school difficult and lacked good study habits, struggling with his classes but never giving up. Fortunately, the UBC Dean and some of the professors encouraged him and he finally graduated at 34.
“For a long time, it really didn’t strike me as significant that I was the first (Aboriginal to graduate in law),” Scow is quoted as saying in the law alumni magazine, even though the head of the Indian Affairs Department for B.C. attended his ceremony. “I want to do whatever I can to show my gratitude because (it) really changed my whole life.”

Scow began private practice in 1962 and married his English wife Joan Heaton-Peterson in 1964. The couple had no children.

As a lawyer with only two years’ experience, he was asked by a Fort Rupert couple to defend their daughter, charged with murder. He deferred, insisting they hire a senior lawyer, but they wanted him. Finally, he asked a top criminal lawyer what he should do. “You’re a lawyer, aren’t you?” the man asked. Scow replied in the affirmative and was told “Well then, take the (expletive) case!” He did, and his client was acquitted.

Scow was appointed to provincial court in 1971, and expected to hold the job for the rest of his career. But in 1967, he was appointed as a representative of Canada on a fact-finding commission in Guyana, and was later appointed chair of a board of review for the B.C. Workers Compensation Board.

He also served on the management council for UBC’s First Nations House of Learning and was a lifetime member of the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Society, where he was the founding president.

In his retirement years, Scow broadened his scope to include activities that would better the position of Aboriginal people across Canada.

“He didn’t sit idle,” said Dion. He quietly developed organizations and set up scholarships to help individuals, and Canadian society, as a whole, she explained. Significantly, he established a bursary fund with the Provincial Court Judges for needy law students at UBC, and the Scow Institute for Communicating Information on Aboriginal Issues.

Scow would have been 87 on April 10, and would have celebrated his 50th wedding anniversary this August. He died at home surrounded by his extended family on Feb. 26. “We all die. The goal isn’t to live forever; the goal is to create something that will,” reads a post on the Facebook page developed after his passing.

Angela Sidney - Footprints

Angela Sidney

Angela Sidney: Preserving the culture, a personal endeavor

Cheryl Petten,
Windspeaker Writer

As a young girl, Angela Sidney loved to sit and listen to her parents, aunts and uncles tell stories. She loved to hear them talk about the traditions and culture of her people, and recount the histories of the Tagish and Tlingit people of southern Yukon through the ancient stories that had been passed down from generation to generation.

Angela Sidney devoted much of her life to preserving the stories of her people, the Tagish of the southern Yukon. Her legacy is left in
the many books she authored and a storytelling festival held each summer that she inspired.

But Sidney was living in a time of transition and as she grew older, she noticed that fewer and fewer of the people around her were telling the old stories. She worried that the Tagish language, in particular, and the history and culture of the Aboriginal people of the southern Yukon, would be lost.

So Sidney, one of the last fluent speakers of the Tagish language, decided to take on the responsibility to preserve the language and the stories. The result of her effort can be seen, not only in the number of books she authored, but in an annual storytelling festival that she inspired.

"I have no money to leave for my grandchildren," Sidney once said. "My stories are my wealth."

For centuries, the Tagish people traded with the neighboring Tlingit, and often there was intermarriage. By the middle of the 1800s, the Tagish people began to use the Tlingit language more than their own, and to practice Tlingit customs as well. The Tagish culture and language were further eroded in the 1900s when white prospectors came to the Yukon in their quest for gold.

Sidney was born near Carcross on Jan. 4, 1902. Her mother was Maria John, a woman of Tlingit ancestry, her father Tagish John.

When she was born, she was given three names. She was called Ch'óonehte' Ma in Tagish, Stóow in Tlingit, and Angela in English.

Sidney spoke Tagish only until she was about five years old. After that, she spoke Tlingit, and then English. Yet after 80 years, she could draw from the memories of her early childhood and still speak Tagish fluently.

Sidney and her older brother Johnny, born four years earlier, were the start of a new family for her parents, who had lost four children a few years earlier when a series of epidemics-German measles, dysentery, smallpox and jaundice-swept through the territory. Sidney's mother, too, had taken ill during that time and, although she survived, the experience left her weak.

As the oldest daughter, the responsibility to care for her mother fell to Sidney and she had ample opportunity to ask questions about family history and about the culture and stories of the people. She added to this wealth of knowledge with her own experiences, gained over almost a century of living.

It was perhaps the transitions the community was experiencing that fueled Sidney's desire to record the stories and language of her people. Often while growing up, she would hear stories about the way things had been done in the past, and then was disappointed when her experiences did not match those stories. For example, she didn't receive a potlatch name because when it was time, there was no Elder in her clan that could give it to her, because the people with that knowledge had passed on. And her puberty seclusion, a tradition among young Tagish girls, wasn't taken as seriously as it had been in the past, and was actually cut short so that Sidney could return home to help her mother.
Living through this time of transition meant that, in many aspects of her life, Sidney had to live in two worlds. As a young girl caring for a sick mother, she learned traditional healing, and as an adult, she studied medical textbooks. She used both this old and new knowledge to care for the people of Carcross as their unofficial nurse.

She married her husband George Sidney in the custom of her people, but the couple was also married in the Anglican church. (Sidney was only 14 when she married; her husband twice that age. When he referred to her in the traditional Tlingit way-which in English translates into auntie-she was embarrassed, even though she knew he was using the term to show respect. She thought it was too old-fashioned, and was worried that white people would think she'd married her nephew.)

More often than not, however, Sidney embraced both worlds and tried to pass on her affection for both to her own children. She didn't want them to be "old-fashioned," but at the same time, she didn't want them to forget the ways of their ancestors. This is the approach Sidney took in her life.

When her son was overseas with the Canadian Army during the Second World War, Sidney bought a radio so she could keep up with the latest news from the front. Later, on his return, she welcomed him home with a gift of an ancient Tlingit song.

Sidney began to focus on the preservation of the history, traditions, language and stories of the southern Yukon in the mid-1970s. She had some of the stories included in two books-My Stories Are My Wealth, published in 1977, and Tagish Tlaagu, published in 1982. She also published a book documenting Tagish and Tlingit place names for locations around the territory's southern lakes.

In 1983, Sidney joined with long-time collaborator Julie Cruikshank to produce Haa Shagoon: Our Family History, a record of Sidney's family tree, dating back to the mid-1800s and covering six generations.

Sidney also had a chance to share her own life story when, in 1990, she collaborated again with Cruikshank, as well as with two other Yukon Elders, Kitty Smith and Annie Ned, for the book Life Lived Like a Story.

Sidney shared traditional tales about how Crow created the world, how the animals were born, and how the seasons came to be. Her stories were filled with animals that could speak and transform into human form.

She told stories to teach children the way they should behave, and to explain why things are done a certain way. And she told stories recounting events that happened in the lives of her own family.

Skookum Jim, her father's cousin, was one of the people credited with starting the gold rush in the Yukon. In one of Sidney's stories, Jim rescues a frog trapped in a ditch, and the frog, in turn, heals Jim when he becomes injured. The spirit of the frog later comes to Jim in a dream, in the form of a beautiful woman, and tells him he will find his luck down the Yukon River. A year later, Jim goes down the river, and discovers gold.

Sidney and her stories were the inspiration behind the Yukon International Storytelling Festival, which was created in 1988 by fellow storytellers Anne Taylor and Louise Profeit LeBlan, when they learned that Sidney had had to travel to Toronto to share her stories in a festival setting. The Yukon International Storytelling Festival is held in Whitehorse every summer, and features storytellers from across Canada and around the world. This year's festival will be held July 5 and 6.

Sidney became a member of the Order of Canada in 1986, when she made history as the first Native woman from the Yukon to receive the honor.

Annie Pootoogook - Footprints

Annie Pootoogook

 

Death of Inuit artist unleashes flood of emotion

By Dianne Meili

Deceased: September 19, 2016

The sudden passing of Annie Pootoogook, 47, in Ottawa this past Sept. 19 brought two waves of emotion. There was initial grief amongst those who knew her as a friend and influential artist, and a flood of national anger as discrimination within law enforcement surfaced.

Police initially refused to investigate suspicious conditions surrounding Pootoogook’s death, even though her body had washed up on the shore of the Rideau River. An Ottawa police officer then wrote on social media that the artist’s death “could be a suicide, accidental, she got drunk and drowned” and in a second post he wrote “much of the Aboriginal population in Canada is just satisfied being alcohol or drug abusers.”

The comments were widely condemned as racist and gave rise to an internal investigation of the officer’s conduct.

Acclaimed artist, Annie Pootoogook was from Kinngait, the Inuktitut name for Cape Dorset. As the daughter of Napachie and Eegyvudlu Pootoogook, and granddaughter of Pitseolak Ashoona – all acclaimed artists – she was always drawing.

Despite the fact southerners at first rejected her art, which depicted real life, modern scenes around Kinngait instead of the preferred visions of traditional life like seal hunting and drum dancing, Pootoogook stuck with her aesthetic.

Even though she knew she would have made more money drawing pictures to please buyers, she continued to draw raw, intimate scenes of her life, as harsh as they sometimes seemed.

Her independence paid off, and her drawings caught the attention of Toronto art dealer Pat Feheley, who initiated Pootoogook’s trajectory to fame by giving her a solo exhibition in 2003 at Feheley Fine Art.

She promoted the young artist’s “honest” artwork to Toronto Power Plant curator Nancy Campbell, who asked Pootoogook to try a large format drawing for a show at her facility.

Cape Dorset Freeze– an image of northerners peering through the glass doors of a supermarket freezer–was the highlight of the show and was later purchased by the National Gallery of Canada.

Two months after the Power Plant show, Pootoogook won the prestigious $50,000 Sobey Award in November 2006. She travelled to Montreal to accept the award, and then went home to Cape Dorset to spend some, and give much of it away.

Another artistic coup came in 2007 with the inclusion of her work in Germany’s Documenta 12, for which she made national headlines and became the pride of her home community.

Pootoogook travelled to Europe for the event, and returned to Kinngait to stay for a while after the trip.

Deciding to live in Montreal and then Ottawa, she found a freedom in the city she couldn’t have in her close-knit Kinngait. She began working with oil stick, a more sophisticated medium than pen, ink and crayon.

Another large-format drawing emerged called Drawing my Grandmother’s Glasses. It was purchased by the Art Gallery of Ontario. A solo exhibit in The National Museum of the American Indian in New York displayed her artwork from 2009 to 2010.

Though her work seemed technically simple, her themes were wide-ranging and often playful, though her heavier themes of domestic violence challenged southern stereotypes of traditional life on the land.

Eschewing outdoor pursuits, Pootoogook loved to draw simple domestic scenes of people watching television or even cutting up a seal on the kitchen floor. A more hard-hitting picture illustrates a man advancing toward a woman sitting up in bed, his arms bent backward holding a large stick with which he’s about to hit her. The man is her boyfriend, and she is the woman in bed.

She is often quoted as having said she could only draw what she had lived.

“I didn’t see any igloos in my life,” Pootoogook says in a 2006 documentary about her art. “Only Skidoo, Honda, the house, things inside the house.”

Pootoogook and her cousin Shuvinai Ashoona are credited with altering the predictable stream of traditional artwork coming out of Kinngait which was considered more craft than art.

They altered the public’s idea of what Inuit art was and could be, opening doors for younger artists to experiment in their wake.

“Many of her drawings touch upon the devastation that alcoholism and suicide have wrought – both of which occur in epic proportions in the north, where communities are still healing from the open wounds of colonialism and the radical severing of lives once lived in rhythm with the land,” wrote Jasmine Budak in a 2012 blog.

Former Kinngait studio manager Bill Ritchie described Pootoogook as “engaging … hip, cool, and smart as a whip.” Jason St-Laurent of Ottawa’s SAW Gallery described her as a shining light, a free spirit who lived life on her own terms.

Pootoogook has also been described as humble, kind, vulnerable, and generous to a fault. She struggled with the success that her practice brought and for a period it was as though everyone wanted a piece of her.

At the annual vigil for Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women, held just days after Potoogook’s death, her second cousin Sytukie Joamie told a huge crowd, which included Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, “Annie was afraid to go near the water, yet she was found in the water. One of our sisters was found under very suspicious circumstances, yet … the police said there was no suspicion. The Inuit community, when we heard about Annie being found, we knew right away that it was suspicious because nobody walks into the water.”

Pootoogook’s boyfriend William Watt also stated she was afraid of water and would only enter it up to her knees.

A memorial service for Pootoogook was held in Ottawa, and then her body was flown to Kinngait for burial. The funeral service was held entirely in Inuktitut and was highly emotional. The artist’s youngest daughter, Napachie, 4, was brought to the funeral by her adoptive parents. It was the first time she met her extended Inuit family and her first visit to the north.

Annie Pootoogook artwork

Ben Michel - Footprints

Ben Michel

Ben Michel: Innu leader believed in creating a better future for his people

Deceased: Summer 2006

By Heather Andrews Miller

The passing of Ben Michel this past summer at the age of 53 from a massive and unexpected heart attack has left a void in the leadership of the Innu Nation. For approximately 30 years, Michel advocated for Innu rights so his people could have control over their lives and their land. He devoted his entire working life to being a political leader and while still in his teen years and early twenties was actively participating in protecting the land and the way of life of his people.

Since those early years, Michel had passionately joined other leaders of the 2000-member Innu Nation to achieve partnerships with the government of Newfoundland and Labrador and the federal government. Even before his election as president of the Innu Nation in 2004 he had been at the table of many comprehensive land rights negotiations and participated in numerous protests and evictions of mining companies who had begun development on Innu lands without permission or negotiation.

Ben—Penote in Innu — Michel was born on June 28, 1953 to Shimun Michel and Mani-An Michel of Sheshatshiu, Labrador, the fourth child of the 12 who would eventually be born to the couple. The English schools he attended at Sheshatshiu and Wabush gave him bilingual abilities, a skill he would find helpful later in his life when dealing with industry and government officials, but he always remained fluent in his Native Innu tongue.

Michel and his siblings were taught by their parents (who are still alive and  are respected Elders in the 1,200 resident community of Sheshatshiu) to honor the land, and the family often enjoyed a traditional lifestyle. Later, he would pass on the same values to his own four children as he travelled the country to conduct negotiations and hold meetings about pertinent issues that would affect their future. He chose to drive to the many meetings he attended so he could bring his children along with him rather than leaving them behind at home. The family travelled every year to an annual gathering in Quebec, meeting with the Montagnais people with whom the Innu share their language and culture, but holidaying and relaxing as a family as well.

Michel was one of the people who could remember the Innu as a sovereign people with their own sustainable economy based on hunting, fishing and gathering. He saw the damage that mining, forestry, and hydroelectric projects were doing to the land and sought to ensure the Innu had a say in how these developments would unfold so that the environment could be protected.

One of the Innu’s first experiences with industrial development was the Churchill Falls power project in the early 1970s that proceeded to drown forever a portion of their hunting grounds, trap lines and ancestral burial sites without any consultation or negotiation with the Innu. The unfortunate experience taught a young Michel and the Innu leaders that they needed to insist on meeting with government and industry to ensure they were part of the planning for any further developments. This set the stage for most of Michel’s career as he spent the rest of his life delivering this message and ensuring agreements were carried out. Members of the community united in showing great support in any action necessary to get the attention of those in control of non-Aboriginal development.

Michel was involved in protests concerning military low level flight training over Labrador and eastern Quebec in the 1990s. Canada and its NATO allies allowed supersonic jets to fly over the area, as many as 30 to 40 times a day, flying low to avoid radar detection and greatly disturbing the wildlife, causing caribou to miscarry and threatening the food that the Innu and other Aboriginal people in the area hunted for survival. Children were startled by the planes that appeared with no warning of their approach and, clipping the tree tops, flew over the home lands with a noise twice as loud as thunder. The protests went on for years.

When the extension of a logging road right next to the community was planned, again without consultation, Michel and other leaders gave an eviction notice to officials and workers and set up tents to ensure that once they left they did not return.

The protestors continued their presence until a series of meetings resulted in then-premier Clyde Wells agreeing to prevent the road from being extended. In 1994, the Voisey’s Bay nickel deposit was discovered in the area and the Innu found they were once again protesting the apparent ignoring of their rights as exploration of the area began without consultation. Michel helped to organize and attend the protests, which were eventually effective and gave the development companies and governments notice that the Innu must be included in any further development. They were joined in this protest by nearby Inuit people, whose lands were also threatened by the mining development.

One of the many people Michel met during his years of political leadership was Dr. David Suzuki, and family members say that the two found they had many environmental concerns in common and a great mutual respect for one another and the work each was doing.
Michel wanted to share the spotlight as leader with those around him and he taught and trained others with his knowledge and skills, including Daniel Ashini, the new leader of the Innu Nation.  The incoming president has said he will continue working towards the vision he shared with his cousin, who was attending mining rights negotiations in Quebec at the time of his death in August. Ashini is a strong negotiator in his own right and has represented the Innu Nation in past land claims and numerous other activities, but admits the work is ongoing.

At the funeral held in Michel’s home community of Sheshatshiu, more than 500 overflowed a school gymnasium for a five-hour service of remembrance. In attendance were politicians, friends and family members. Condolences poured in from across the country and the Combined Councils of Labrador asked all communities across the province to fly their flags at half mast.

In a statement of condolence issued by the office of the federal minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Jim Prentice called Michel a man of the people, someone who spoke passionately about the right to self-determination and possessed both vision and the ability to carry out the work necessary to see that vision become reality.

Family members say near the end, Michel seemed always to be tired, as if his many years of political and leadership duties were beginning to take their toll.

He leaves behind his wife Janet, his four children— James, Yvette, Annette, and Megan—grandchildren, his siblings, nieces and nephews, and his parents. He also leaves an entire community that continues to mourn his too-early passing but which will be forever grateful for the difference he made in their lives through his efforts to preserve the culture and the way of life for so many people. He will be remembered as the father of the Innu people.

 

Bernice Sayese - Footprints

Bernise Sayese

Bernice Sayese: Mama Bear gave selflessly for the betterment of her community

Deceased: March 4, 2004

By Heather Andrews Miller

Bernice Sayese has been gone almost seven years now, taken far too young at age 52. But the work she began is continuing.

The Métis woman, who was affectionately known as Mama Bear for the way she took all youth into her loving care, was born on June 5, 1951 in Glenmary, a Métis settlement located north of Kinistino, Sask. She lived most of her life in Prince Albert, a city that was enriched by her involvement in numerous organizations and institutions. She was mother to Shauna, Michael and James and unofficial mother to many of the youth of Prince Albert. Her untimely death on March 4, 2004 from cancer was mourned by friends and family, the citizens of Prince Albert, and countless others whose lives she touched.

One of her proudest moments occurred when she received the 2002 Prince Albert Citizen of the Year Award in recognition of her outstanding contributions to society, becoming the first Aboriginal women ever to receive the award. She was lovingly nominated by her daughter Shauna, who at the time stated that she had wanted her mother to be considered for the honour because she never blew her own horn so someone else had to do it on her behalf.

Sayese received the Citizen of the Year Award with humility, wondering why she was being singled out for recognition when there were so many others equally as deserving, and was thankful for receiving the honour not because it recognized her efforts, but because it shone a light on the contributions being made by Aboriginal people in general.

The list of community organizations with which Sayese was involved is a long and impressive one and includes the Play and Learn Daycare, the Integrated Youth Committee, the Métis Fall Festival, the Saskatchewan Child Nutrition Network, Won-Ska Cultural school, the Prince Albert Indian and Métis Friendship Centre, the Saskatchewan Police Commission and numerous others.
Sayese was a founding board member of the Prince Albert and Area Community Foundation, the Interval House Safe Shelter for Women and Children’s Haven. She helped establish a lodge for homeless men and served as a community development officer with the City of Prince Albert and as a member of the Mayor’s Task Force on Race Relations.

But the work for which she will always be especially remembered is the Voices of the North talent show, first held as part of the Prince Albert Winter Festival in 1992. Originally begun by Sayese, Sheryl Kimbley, Julie Roy and others as a way to showcase Aboriginal performers from northern Saskatchewan, the event proved so successful that talent from across Saskatchewan and beyond soon began to audition for the show.

Sayese opened up the program to all genres of music, whether it was country or rock or jazz. Last year’s edition of Voices of the North, the fourteenth running of the show, promoted the theme of “Celebrating Our Diversity” and reflected the differing musical genres which the show has grown to feature. This year’s event, to be held on February 15 to 17, promises to continue this diversity, which would without doubt meet with Mama Bear’s approval.

Sayese is credited with coming up with the vision for the talent show as a way to promote and support youth in the performing arts because she recognized what having an opportunity to perform could do to a young person’s confidence.

A number of performers that got their start through Voices of the North have gone on to great success in their musical careers and credit the show with giving them much-valued exposure. Chester Knight, Ray Villebrun, Vern Cheechoo, Krystle Pederson, Jay Ross and Teagan Littlechief are just some of the performers who have graced the Voices of the North stage over the years.

Through her involvement in Voices of the North, Sayese did more than just give fledgling artists a place to perform. Many times she became a guardian angel to band members, watching them, helping them find their audience and encouraging them in their chosen career. She cared about each and every one of them, and recognized that the music they performed for the show could pull some of them out of undesirable lifestyles.
Sayese made sure that every guitar player had a gig for the upcoming weekend and kept each in mind when hearing about a job that would suit a particular individual. She remembered birthdays, anniversaries and graduations and kept a supply of spare guitar strings on hand just in case.

Former Saskatchewan MP Rick Laliberte got his start in the entertainment world at Voices of the North, and served as master of ceremonies for the event for several years after making the jump from entertainer to politician. To mark the tenth anniversary of the event in 2002, Laliberte presented a guitar to Sayese as a symbol of all she had done for Aboriginal music. When Voices of the North was held in 2004, just weeks before Sayese’s passing, the guitar was placed on stage as a tribute to Mama Bear, alongside a teddy bear draped with a Métis sash. That guitar has had a place on the Voices of the North Stage each year since as an ongoing tribute to Sayese and her years of work and dedication to making the event a success Those who have taken over the organization of the talent show have vowed to ensure the guitar remains as a remembrance of Sayese at every show in the future.

Sayese always wanted to see Aboriginal people in a good light, and the talent show was just one way she worked toward that goal. She also worked to improve race relations by her work in the community, and devoted her time and energies to assisting the homeless and the hungry, the young, people in penitentiaries, visitors at the friendship centre, and women who were struggling to put their lives back together after coming out of an abusive situation. She treated all those she met as equals, and greeted them always with kindness and a caring heart.

Sayese’s hard work and dedication continued to be recognized after her passing. In March 2006, she was inducted posthumously into the Council of Women Hall of Fame in Prince Albert and the West Flat Community Centre in Prince Albert was renamed the Bernice Sayese Centre in her honour.

Since her passing, those who knew Sayese and worked closely with her have tried to step in and ensure the work she began is continued. They believe that by demonstrating how much one person can accomplish she has set an example that will become her lasting legacy, encouraging others to get involved in organizations that benefit the whole community. She remains a wonderful role model to all.

Her loss is still felt, but friends and family can take solace in the fact that Sayese would not want them to sit around mourning, but would encourage them to get on with doing what needs to be done.

Bill Reid - Footprints

Bill Reid: Caught between two worlds

Cheryl Petten

Deceased: March 13, 1998

Bill Reid Haida carver and artist

Artist Bill Reid began his life in Victoria on Jan. 12, 1920. William Ronald Reid was the first of three children born to Sophie and Billy Reid. His mother was Haida from Skidegate, his father, an American whose mother was German and father Scottish.

After her marriage to Billy Reid in 1919, Sophie Reid had distanced herself from her Haida heritage. She knew that her children's mixed blood made them less acceptable to white society than they would have been if they'd been full-blooded Indians. But although she adopted a white way of life, she still kept in close contact with her family back in Skidegate, and continued to wear silver bracelets adorned with traditional Haida designs, some of which were created for her by her father, Charlie Gladstone.

The relationship between Sophie and Billy Reid was tumultuous, with Sophie and the children dividing their time between Victoria and Hyder, a community on the border between B.C. and Alaska where Billy Reid owned and operated hotels. When the young Bill was 13, he made the move from Hyder to Victoria for the last time, leaving behind a father he would never see again.
Growing up in Victoria, Reid never acknowledged his Native roots, nor did he acknowledge them during the year he spent at Victoria College, or the next year when, at the age of 18, he began his career in radio.

He worked as a radio announcer in B.C., Quebec and Ontario for a decade before joining the CBC in Toronto in 1948. That same year, he began studying jewelry making at Ryerson Institute of Technology. It was during his time at Ryerson that Reid first told his acquaintances of his Haida lineage, when his studies rekindled his interest in creating jewelry that incorporated Native designs.

Reid's interest in Native art and design dated back to his childhood when his mother would take her children home to Skidegate for visits. Reid admired the jewelry and carvings created by his grandfather, as well as those created by others in the community, including those made by his grandfather's uncle, Charles Edenshaw, whose work now stands alongside Reid's as the epitome of West Coast art. During these visits, Reid would spend much time with his grandfather, watching him create silver bracelets or argillite carvings, in much the same way as his grandfather had learned his craft by watching Edenshaw.

At Ryerson he began to incorporate West Coast themes into his work. At first, he was simply replicating the work created by his predecessors, but later began to adapt the traditional designs, creating work that merged Native and Western art into one. This renewed interest in his Native heritage also spilled over into his broadcasting career, where he documented attempts to salvage totem poles that were succumbing to the elements in now deserted Native communities.

Reid has been described as a bridge between the Native and non-Native worlds. But he has also been portrayed as someone who lived between those worlds, never truly accepted in either. He took his inspiration for his art from the creations of the great Haida carvers who had come before him. But inspiration also came from books on Native art created by non-Native ethnographers, and from studying the works of non-Native artists.

His technical knowledge had the same fractured origins. He learned carving at the side of Native artists such as his grandfather and Kwakwaka'wakw artist Mungo Martin, but learned jewelry making from non-Native instructors and artisans.

As his skills as a jeweler improved, and his interest in Haida design increased, Reid transformed from a radio personality who made jewelry on the side into a world-renowned Haida artist.

While much of his success lay in his talent for translating Haida imagery into something visually beautiful, his career was buoyed by his willingness to get to know the right people and cultivate the right connections, something other Native artists of the time either couldn't or wouldn't do.

Reid brought about a change in the way the work of Native artists was viewed by the Western world through his ceaseless work to have Native jewelry and carvings accepted as fine art rather than viewed as handicraft.

While his most famous works are his large scale carvings-The Spirit of Haida Gwaii on display outside the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. and the Raven and the First Men, found at the University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology -Reid saw himself primarily as a maker of jewelry.

His goal from the outset was to create beautiful, modern jewelry, and many times he swore to abandon Native art all together so he could pursue that goal. But each time the path he traveled returned him to the art form with which he is most closely associated.

At the height of his career, Reid was earning more than any other Native artist. In the early 1990s, gold replicas of the Raven and the First Men were fetching $125,000 each. And in 1995, he earned the largest commission in the history of Canadian art when the Vancouver International Airport paid him $3 million for another version of The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, this time created with a green patina and named The Jade Canoe.

One of the ironies of Reid's life was that, as he became more successful in his artistic career, he also became less physically able to continue his work. In the early 1970s, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, a chronic and progressive neurologic disorder that can cause hand tremors and stiffness of the limbs. As the disease progressed, he grew less and less able to create with his own hands, and grew more and more reliant on his assistants to transform his visions into solid form.

In the end, the disease made it difficult for him to speak, and to think clearly. Then, on March 13, 1998, at the age of 78, Bill Reid passed away.

Two separate memorial services were held to honor Reid after his death, the first in the Great Hall of UBC's Museum of Anthropology, just a stone's throw away from the Haida village Reid had helped recreate on the campus in 1959. More than 1,000 people came to pay their respects to Reid-mainstream politicians, First Nations leaders, Elders, fellow carvers, family and friends among them-during a service that lasted more than six hours.

The second ceremony took place at Skidegate, the birthplace of his mother, and at T'

After a three-day journey, the Lootas arrived at its final destination, and on the beach where T'anuu had once stood, some of Reid's ashes were scattered, and the rest buried. Bill Reid had found his final resting place, but not before leaving a substantial and impressive artistic legacy.

Billy Diamond - Footprints

Billy Diamond

The diamond in the rough became a polished gem of a man

Dianne Meili

When Billy Diamond was a skinny, seventeen-year-old he watched young Cree leader Robert Kanatewat tell bureaucrats that English would be the language used in the new community school to teach students, not French.
The government officials agreed with him, and the visiting Kanatewat flew out of the reserve, then known as Rupert House, but not before he’d left a lasting impression on the politician-to-be.

“He was carrying a briefcase – a briefcase in Rupert House!” recalled Billy in Chief, The Fearless Vision of Billy Diamond, a biography written about him by Roy MacGregor.

“Every eye was on him, not because of the way he was dressed or anything, but because of the way he carried himself … so calm and so sure of himself,” he added. For the first time in his life, Billy saw “the kind of authority a real chief should have.”

Back in his Sault Ste Marie high school, Billy was beginning to feel Indian pride and become politically aware. He helped set up the first Indian Students’ Council in the city and edited the group’s newspaper.
After high school, Billy returned to his community, now known as Waskaganish First Nation in Quebec, and helped his father Chief Malcolm Diamond with political affairs.

He quickly established himself as a major player in his small village, organizing grant applications, handling welfare cheques, and becoming the first resident to own a shiny new skidoo.

In 1970, at the age of 21, Billy was elected as chief of his community. A month later, eight bedraggled Cree elders walked into his office saying they had met land surveyors in the bush who told them their magnificent lake was going to be flooded.

It was true. Premier Robert Bourassa wanted to harness the power of James Bay in a $6-billion hydroelectric project that would give Quebec economic stability and create 125,000 jobs.

Even though the Cree had hunted and trapped for more than  5,000 years along the coastal rivers, they were forgotten in development of the “project of the century.” Billy took on the government like the fighter he was, and he brought out the battling instinct in his people.
He showed trappers maps indicating the devastation of the flooding to their livelihoods, and began organizing meetings so the government would have to listen to a galvanized front. In 1974 he became the first Grand Chief of the Grand Council of the Crees of Quebec and later signed one of the biggest land claim settlements in Canada – The James Bay and Northern Quebed Agreement – with the provincial and federal governments.

Billy created national and international media attention to spotlight the plight of the Cree and Inuit of the north, and went to the United Nations to argue the Aboriginal case. His land claim action set a new standard for how government engaged with Aboriginal communities.
In his personal life, though, Billy was so caught up with the fight over the flooding that he barely noticed his wife Elizabeth was almost to term with her second pregnancy.

His wife wanted him home for the birth and she complained it was all she could do to care for their toddler with him away so much. He promised to be there for her – the first of many he would not keep – but arrived late to a feverish newborn and distressed mother. At the community medical clinic the parents watched helplessly as their daughter took a final shallow breath and died.

Billy didn’t have long to mourn; he took on the role of businessman and entrepreneur, as well. The Cree were awarded $136 million in cash and investment infrastructure that totalled more than $1.4 billion, and he helped establish companies that would take his impoverished community into new prosperity: Air Creebec, the Cree Construction Company, and Cree Yamaha Motors.

Billy’s next big battle came in the 1980s around the table with Pierre Trudeau and Jean Cretien regarding the Canadian Constitution.

“He took a tremendous negotiating role in those talks,” recalled Chief Patrick Madahbee, of the Anishinabek Nation Grand Council. “He took a hard line and he always knew his stuff. He was the quickest man to counter any argument.”

Billy’s efforts resulted in Section 35 of the Constitution being amended so that “treaty rights” would include current rights that existed by way of land claims agreements or those that may be acquired. There was now no question that the country’s Constitution protected the claims of his own Crees and all other Aboriginal Canadians.

Though Billy was such a prominent leader “he stayed down-to-earth and was likeable,” said Madahbee. “He kept us laughing through all the political strife. He was an excellent impersonator and he was quite the comedian with his impressions of some of the government politicians we were dealing with.”

In 1982, a coup in Billy’s career came when he sought an audience with Pope John Paul II. Seeking favor with his Cree people who had become suspicious of his high-profile dealings, Billy knew the Catholic church held power over them. He announced the meeting before even fathoming how he would arrange it, but managed to cut through levels of command to find himself at the Vatican telling the pope about the neglect his people experienced in their own country.

As his public life flourished , the chief’s personal life deteriorated. At 34, he had four children but he was seldom home to see them. Away from his community, he smoked and drank hard with business associates and peers, and he was becoming alienated from his wife.
She had joined the local Pentecostal church and was “reborn.” Billy tore up the simple religious messages Elizabeth left pasted on the refrigerator door and even showed up drunk to an evening service she was attending.

Billy’s residential school days had left him hating God, and he was sure nothing good could come of his wife’s obsession with this judgmental and punishing icon.
After binge drinking and terrorizing his family, he was alone and sick. Overweight and overworked, he was seeing double and his heart raced periodically.

In Val d’Or one night, as he drove himself to the hospital, he turned into the local Pentecostal church. There, he fell to his knees and prayed for himself. A warmth came over him and he stayed “basking in the glow of what was happening to me,” for a long time, he recalled.

The pain in his chest, arms and hands was gone.

Renewed, Billy became a spiritual man, reuniting with his wife and family and quitting booze and cigarettes. In 1984 he informed the Grand Council of the Crees of Quebec that he was stepping down as grand chief.

“I feel the age of confrontation is now basically over and now it’s down to nation building,” he told delegates.

Retiring to his home community, Billy created and fostered groundbreaking businesses like Air Creebec and even brokered a deal with Yamaha Motor Canada to re-design old-style river boats and manufacture stream-lined, fibreglass, Waskaganish-built craft.

He would even become chief of his community once again before his passing.

The much-lauded business and political leader, and father of six, died on the morning of Sept. 30 from a heart attack, his wife Elizabeth at his side.

Black Elk - Footprints

Black Elk

Black Elk: Black Elk spent his life staying true to his vision of life

Deceased: Aug. 17 or 19 (sources differ) in 1950

By Dianne Meili

At the age of nine, the spirits entrusted Black Elk with no less a task than saving his Lakota nation.

No doubt other “wakan” – sacred men and women – received visions to help their people as well, but Black Elk’s story is the only one so well publicized. John G. Neihart, an American poet, immortalized the medicine man in the flawed “Black Elk Speaks” and he became a cultural icon.

In the “moon of the Popping Trees (December) in about 1863, a baby named Black Elk was born to Black Elk Sr. and his wife White Cow Sees on Little Powder River in present-day Wyoming. This Oglala Lakota child, of Big Road’s band, was second cousin to the luminary Crazy Horse.

In the summer of 1872, when his band was moving slowly towards the Rocky Mountains, Black Elk was eating when he heard a voice say, “It is time; now they are calling you.”

The next day he was riding with some boys and his legs crumpled under him when he dismounted from his horse. He rode in a travois as the camp moved, his face puffed up and his legs and arms badly swollen.

Falling into a coma for the next 12 days, he travelled with two “spirit men”, who took him into the clouds where he observed his vision. Black, white, sorrels and buckskin horses danced before him and transformed into “every kind of animal and all the fowls that are.”

Ahead of him, heaped-up clouds formed a tipi with a rainbow over the open door and inside sat six old men.
Black Elk, in Neihart’s book, said he “shook all over with fear” because he recognized the grandfathers were “the powers of the world” or powers of the six directions. He was blessed with thunder being medicine and given a special “four-rayed” herb with blue, white, red and yellow blossoms that could help his people be healthy. In the course of his vision he saw his Lakota people “thin, their faces sharp, for they were starving”, but he later saw them dancing in a “sacred hoop” around one mighty flowering tree.

Black Elk saw all of his people well and happy, except for one “lying like the dead.” That was himself, on the earth, lying in a coma. As one of the old men sang a sacred song, Black Elk returned to his body and sat up, to the delight of his heartsick parents who had kept vigil over their sick son.

In his teen years Black Elk told no one of his vision and strange things continued to happen to him when he was alone. He was confused about what he was supposed to do and he became terrified of rainstorms, lest the thunder beings come to him again.

During his early years, the first signs of great upheaval occurred. Europeans were beginning to travel through the sacred Black Hills, his Lakota homeland, and Black Elk found himself fighting, at 12, in the infamous 1876 Battle of Little Big Horn.

In his sixteenth year, Black Elk could think only of his vision during the sun dance and how he had not yet done anything about it. He stopped sleeping and became “queerer than ever.”

His concerned parents asked an old medicine man, Black Road, to help their son, and Black Elk finally told the Elder about the vision that was bothering him. To his relief, Black Road said he would help his nephew perform the vision on earth because that is what the grandfathers wanted him to do. During the vision’s re-creation, Black Elk saw his revelation again and feared it no longer. In fact, the thunder clouds came “as relatives came to visit me” and he began rising each morning with the daybreak star. Medicine people came to discuss his vision and he immersed himself in ceremony and healing.

Until he was 23 Black Elk cured the sick, but by 1886 he was depressed by the decimation of the buffalo and his nation’s hoop falling apart. In an attempt to understand white ways, he traveled “across the big water” to England with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. There he danced and sang one day for Queen Victoria, whom he described as “little, but fat” and for whom he professed a great fondness.

When he missed his boat back to America, Black Elk joined another show and found himself deathly homesick in Paris. His girlfriend invited him to dinner, but suddenly, as he sat at the table, the roof opened up and he rose to “cling onto a cloud” and travel over “towns and green land” back to his Black Hills. In this out of body experience he saw his parents’ tipi and his mother standing outside it, then the cloud whisked him back to Europe.

When he finally returned, the ghost dance movement to eliminate Europeans and restore harmony, led by spiritualist Wovoka, was in full swing. As Black Elk danced, he “floated” upward into a different version